Category: Internet and Technology

How to destroy your digital history

How to destroy your digital history

We all have private information on our computers, phones and tablets. Whether of personal or professional origin, there’s some data that we’d rather no-one else got their hands on. But does deleting a file and emptying the recycle bin do the job?

According to data recovery expert Rob Winter at Kroll Ontrack, “deleting” the file is akin to removing an item from the contents page of a book – the chapter containing the all-important information is still there. For a specialist, it’s not even that hard to find.

Winter and his team are sometimes called out at short notice to help companies retrieve data from “wiped” drives and physically damaged computers.

It is difficult to believe any technology could have survived such a bashing – but in the next clip, discover just how much data (and even some embarrassing pictures) that Winter managed to retrieve from their sorry-looking hard drives.

Recovery services are highly sought-after by organisations who realise they have lost important files. After the 2003 space shuttle Columbia disaster, for example, specialists were able to recover 99% of the data from a Seagate drive found in the wreckage.

So remember, if you hit delete, all is not lost.

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Wisdom in 140 characters: Return of the aphorism?

Wisdom in 140 characters: Return of the aphorism?

“We each have two lives,” a wise person once said, “and the second begins when we realise we have only one.”

I can’t tell you which wise person, sadly; the internet attributes it in roughly equal measure to Confucius and Tom Hiddleston. (It’s not a very Confucian sentiment, so I’m going with Hiddleston.) But it hardly matters. It’s an aphorism, and like all the best ones, it feels as if it always existed, and only needed someone to discover it. Or rediscover it: judging by various new books and essays, this oldest of philosophical forms is making a comeback. Our era of dwindling attention spans and 140-character content-burps is generally held to be one of escalating stupidity. But it’s also ideally suited to aphorisms. So maybe we’ll end up imbibing some wisdom accidentally, too.

There are two species of aphorism, James Lough explains in Short Flights, a recent modern collection. The more irritating is the “instructional” kind: pompous nuggets on how to behave, of the sort dispensed by Benjamin Franklin. (“Early to bed and early to rise.” OK, we get it, Ben. You’re perfect.) Not all instructional aphorisms are terrible: “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle” is useful advice. But juicier by far are “aphorisms of insight”, which don’t tell us what to do, but radically shift our view of how things are. As Lough writes: “An insight aphorism is anarchic, a bomb exploding in an empty house, blasting out the windows, blowing the doors off their hinges.”

Of these, my favourites are the ones that land at first like a bucket of cold water, issuing a bleak assessment of life, yet turn out to contain a liberating truth. Take Rilke, translated by the Jungian psychologist James Hollis: “The purpose of life is to be defeated by ever greater things.” The economist Thomas Sowell: “There are no solutions; there are only tradeoffs.” (You’ll never solve all your problems. So which ones are worth putting up with, to solve the others?)

A line attributed to Joseph Campbell: “We must be willing to let go of the life we had planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.” Or the therapist Sheldon Kopp: “You are free to do whatever you like. You need only face the consequences.” And, yes, I’m aware these are all by men: aphorisms usually are. (The aphorists in Short Flights are three-quarters male.) I’m stereotyping, but I wonder if that’s partly because women writers are less fond of the glib signoff that silently follows every aphorism: “And that’s all that’s worth saying about that!”

But a good aphorism never really draws a line under things. Instead, it keeps on giving, unfolding further meanings. I’m convinced that Earle Hitchner’s quip – “Americans think 100 years is a long time, while the English think 100 miles is a long way” – explains more about transatlantic relations than you’d think. And the whole of human happiness may be encapsulated in Carl Rogers’s line: “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” There are whole books – lots of them – that don’t contain nearly that much wisdom.

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How to create a wifi connection to an iPad

How to create a wifi connection to an iPad

Learn to create a wifi connection for your iPad.

Connecting your iPad to the Internet is as easy as joining an available Wi-Fi network and entering your credentials if required. As one of the top tablets on the market today, the Apple iPad is a powerful tool that can be used for web browsing, video streaming, social networking, online gaming and so much more.

Getting Online With an Apple iPad

These instructions are generally applicable to all current models of the Apple iPad mini, iPad Air and iPad Pro, as well as other iOS devices like the iPhone and iPod touch.

  1. Turn on your iPad.

  2. Enter your lock screen code if required.

  3. Swipe through your home screens until you see Settings.

  4. Tap on Settings.

  5. Select Wi-Fi from the resulting list.

  6. Enable Wi-Fi by tapping on the radio button to the right. It should move the circle to the right and show as green.

How to create a wifi connection to an iPad

  1. Wait while the iPad searches for Wi-Fi networks in the area.

  2. Tap on the name of the network you want to use.

  3. If the network has a lock symbol next to its name, it is secured with a password. If there is no lock symbol, there is no password and this step can be skipped.

— After tapping on the network name, you will be prompted to enter this password.
— Tap on Join.
— Skip the next step.

  1. If it is a public Wi-Fi network, like at a coffee shop or at a hotel, you may need to proceed to a splash page to complete your connection. This is sometimes called a captive Wi-Fi network.

— Tap on the “i” icon next to the captive Wi-Fi network name.
— Tap on Join Network.
— On the resulting page, enter your credentials, sign into your account, or tap to accept the terms and conditions. Each captive network can be a little different in how it is presented.

  1. Once you are connected to the network, a blue checkmark symbol will appear next to the network name and the Wi-Fi symbol will appear at the top-left of the screen.
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How to get more storage on your iPhone

How to get more storage on your iPhone

You have probably been frustrated with your iPhone when you try to download that new app everyone is talking about, only to be told, “there is not enough available storage.” What’s even worse is when you are trying to take a photo or video and can’t because that message comes up.

If you have a 16 GB iPhone, you know this struggle all too well. However, you don’t need to start deciding which apps or photos must go from your phone in order to free up some much-needed space. There is an iPhone hack that will be able to give more storage without you deleting anything from the device.

The hack was first reported by Reddit user eavesdroppingyou, who knows the storage pains all too well. In order to trick the iPhone into thinking it has more storage, the user must act like they are renting a movie. The key is to make sure the movie has a bigger file size than what’s available so you don’t accidentally pay to start streaming it.

Here’s how to get more storage without deleting photos, videos or apps:

Check Your Settings

You will first need to know how much available storage is on the iPhone. Do this by going to Settings > General > About. Scroll down to “Available” to see how many GBs you have left.

Fake Renting A Movie

Now, it’s time to play our iPhone by tricking it into thinking you want to download a movie. Don’t worry, you aren’t really purchasing the title. Go to the iTunes Store and find a movie with a bigger file size than you have left on your device. A good tip is to search for titles with extended editions, like Lord of the Rings, or movies like Cleopatra or Apocalypse Now Redux.

When you try to rent the movie, you will get the message that reads there is not enough storage to be able to download this title, along with the option to tap on “OK” or “Settings.”

Get Back To Settings

Tap on “Settings” in the message, where you will be taken back to where you first started. However, now, you will see that the amount of storage has actually increased. Repeat this a few times to maximize the amount of free storage.

Here’s how the hack works: This might sound like some strange iPhone magic, but there is actually a reasonable explanation to how this hack works. eavesdroppingyou’s best guess is that the device deletes “useless data from different apps” in order to make more room for the movie.

Some users may even see that the iTunes Store features an icon that says “cleaning” after trying this hack. This further suggests that the iPhone is cleaning the cache from the installed apps. At least now, you won’t have to worry about cleaning out our iPhone in order to get more storage.

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Think your password is safe?

Think your password is safe?More than 90 percent of user-generated passwords are vulnerable to hacking, a new study says.

Think you’ve got a clever, un-hackable password? You might want to tack on a few numbers to it. Global consulting firm Deloitte released a report Tuesday with an alarming prediction. More than 90% of user-generated passwords will be vulnerable to hacking, the report, prepared by Deloitte’s Canadian Technology, Media & Telecommunications arm, said. Even those passwords traditionally considered strong — with eight characters and a combination of numbers, letters and symbols — are at risk.

It seems like every other week a major company reports its site was hacked in some way. A year ago online shoe store was hacked, exposing the names, email addresses, phone numbers and partial credit card numbers of 24 million customers, the company said. In June networking site LinkedIn confirmed that a major security breach corresponding to LinkedIn accounts compromised users’ passwords. About 400,000 Yahoo email addresses and passwords were hacked last July. And in 2011, 77 million passwords were stolen from Sony’s PlayStation Network. And that’s just to name a few of the biggies.

Eight isn’t enough

Most of us have been told that a strong eight-character password — with a number or two and a random symbol — is sufficiently secure for even relatively high-value financial transactions. Such a password chosen from all 94 characters available on a standard keyboard is one of 6.1 quadrillion possible combinations. It would take about a year for a relatively fast 2011 desktop computer to try every variation, Deloitte says.

And because the longer and more @, * and % symbols are in our passwords, the harder they are to remember. So we end up using a very small subset of those possible combinations — which makes user-generated passwords susceptible to getting cracked.

“Most people put a capital letter at the beginning, and if you use a symbol, you probably use an exclamation mark,” says Richard Lee, national managing partner in Deloitte’s Technology, Media & Telecom group.

Deloitte cites a recent study of 6 million user-generated passwords; the 10,000 most common passwords would have accessed 98% of all accounts. For anyone who has struggled to memorize the digits of Pi in geometry class, remembering a long and non-intuitive string of characters taxes the human brain’s capabilities. (Deloitte cites a study finding that, in the short term, humans struggle to remember more than seven numbers, and over a longer time frame, the average person can remember only five numbers. Adding symbols and letters makes committing these kinds of combinations to memory tougher.)

The bigger problem, however, is password re-use, says Lee. A study by credit-checking firm Experian last year found that the average user has 26 password-protected online accounts but uses only five different passwords.

So if you use the same password for your bank account online as you do your PlayStation account, a security breach at the gaming site could expose the password that protects your bank account. Deloitte notes advances in the hardware used to crack passwords that have made sensitive information increasingly vulnerable. One of these includes so-called brute-force attacks, which applies each of the 6.1 quadrillion combinations for an eight-character password until one works.

“A dedicated password-cracking machine employing readily available virtualization software and high-powered graphics processing units can crack any eight-character password in 5.5 hours,” the Deloitte report said. Such a machine costs about $30,000 in 2012, but these days “crowd-hacking” lets hackers share the task over thousands of slower machines.

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How Facebook is turning into a giant digital graveyard?

How Facebook is turning into a giant digital graveyard?

At some point, there will be more dead Facebook users than living ones – and for those left behind, it is transforming how we experience the death of those around us.

Observing that phenomenon is a strange thing. There she is, the person you love – you’re talking to her, squeezing her hand, thanking her for being there for you, watching the green zigzag move slower and slower – and then she’s not there anymore.

Another machine, meanwhile, was keeping her alive: some distant computer server that holds her thoughts, memories and relationships. While it’s obvious that people don’t outlive their bodies on digital technology, they do endure in one sense. People’s experience of you as a seemingly living person can and does continue online.

How is our continuing presence in digital space changing the way we die? And what does it mean for those who would mourn us after we are gone?

The numbers of the dead on Facebook are growing fast. By 2012, just eight years after the platform was launched, 30 million users with Facebook accounts had died. That number has only gone up since. Some estimates claim more than 8,000 users die each day. At some point in time, there will be more dead Facebook users than living ones. Facebook is a growing and unstoppable digital graveyard.

How Facebook is turning into a giant digital graveyard?

Many Facebook profiles announce their owners have passed; they are “memorialised”. The profile is emblazoned with the word “remembering”, and they stop appearing in public spaces, like People You May Know or birthday reminders.

But not all Facebook users who have passed away are memorialised.
Kerry, one of my college dorm mates, killed himself a few years ago, and his wife and family and friends regularly post updates on his page, and when they do, Kerry’s profile populates in my Facebook feed.

Neither Kerry nor my Aunt Jackie are memorialised, which means, for all intents and purposes, their deaths haven’t been recognised by Facebook, or by the unwitting users who chance upon them. Their digital identities continue to exist.

Social media has taught us about the power of the moment – connecting right now with people around the globe over awards show, television programmes, football games, social justice issues, and whatnot. But now it may be time to consider what comes after all that: our legacy.

It used to be that only certain prominent people were granted legacies, either because they left written records for their forebears, or because later inquisitive minds undertook that task. But digital technology changes that. Now, each of us spends hours each week – more than 12, according to a recent survey – writing our autobiographies.

As I’ve told my mother, my grandchildren may be able to learn about her by studying her Facebook profile. Assuming the social network doesn’t fold, they won’t just learn about the kinds of major life events that would make it into my mom’s authorised biography.

They’ll learn, rather, the tiny, insignificant details of her day to day life: memes that made her laugh, viral photos she shared, which restaurants she and my father liked to eat at, the lame church jokes she was too fond of. And of course, they’ll have plenty of pictures to go with it. By studying this information, my grandchildren will come to know about their great grandmother.

We might think of our public social media record as some type of digital soul: those perusing my Facebook know my religious beliefs, my political reservations, my love for my partner, my literary tastes. Were I to die tomorrow, my digital soul would continue to exist.

In the past few years, several tech companies have extended the idea of a digital soul. Eterni.me, launched in 2014, promises to create a digital version of “you” that will live on after your death. Death is certain, admits the website — but what if you could live forever as a digital avatar, “and people in the future could actually interact with your memories, stories and ideas, almost as if they were talking to you?”

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How to use Twitter when you search for a job

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

If you’re among the millions of people seeking work, there is more of a social networking site that you may have to join Twitter.

Twitter? For the job search? In the history of Kyle Flaherty. He left a job in marketing at Boston determined to find a job in-house public relations. He tweeted about his decision and included a link to her professional blog, where he described the kind of work he sought. A few days later, his tweet was retweeted. In other words, knowledge was passed – to his current boss.

“I do not think I got it if not for Twitter,” said Flaherty, who moved from Boston to Austin, Texas, for the new job with a pregnant woman and a two year old son.

Twitter basics

Twitter, as you probably know, is the social networking site that lets you send tweets – the equivalent of text messages or status updates from Facebook, but limited to 140 characters. You must keep them very short and simple. To register, simply fill out an online profile. Then you can send tweets and view on your computer, cell phone or mobile internet device. Unlike Facebook, you can follow (receive tweets from) someone, there is no formal process of requesting and accepting.

When you register to monitor tweets from someone, they see that you’re next. It’s a good thing, because they may decide to reciprocate and follow you, too, which is something you want if you are a professional trying to get noticed.

“Twitter gives you access to people you might not otherwise meet or encounter,” says Miriam Salpeter, Career Coach and founder of Keppie Careers in Atlanta.

Join the conversation

Needless to say, not everyone has a job simply tweeting on their employment status. But Twitter, like LinkedIn, Facebook, and industry conferences, is a way to reach out and reach out to people who know the hiring managers or you can submit them.

Many people use Twitter to share ramblings blind, like “having a hamburger with friends this afternoon.” But the most clever Twitterers use to comment on events in their professions. Tweets they follow industry leaders and even to establish informal relations following one another.

If you have never used Twitter, do not sign up immediately and furnaces people with a message saying that you are unemployed. Instead, create a slow dynamics. Open an account and include something about your profession in your username. Since users can search by subject tweets is a way to make your feed more visible.

“I automatically follow back anyone who has a job or jobs in their title,” says Salpeter, whose name is keppie_careers Twitter.

In the profile section, add a few lines about what you do professionally – which also contributes to your searchable.

Before start tweeting, research leaders in your industry, the companies you want to work, and any other professional contacts. Follow them. Many companies – including marketing, public relations, and technology – using Twitter to post job offers, and many hiring managers tweet, too.

“You can hear about jobs, an idea for a business to determine how to interact with them and see how you fit in,” Flaherty said.

Make an impression

Then, start tweeting. Give your opinion on the news, industry events, and seminars. If someone is following you, especially a leader in the industry, says something controversial or interesting, retweet (before), or send the person a direct answer. This may be an ideal way to get a conversation, but more personal.

If you are a hiring manager in a company you want to work out what he or she writes and then adapt your tweets to comment on such things.

This is what John Johansen did when he decided he wanted to leave Boston for a more affordable. It targets marketing professionals in Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, and Austin – and began following their tweets. When someone in the media said something very interesting, he replied with a message @ – public comment. This helped him develop relationships with marketing professionals in the cities. In turn, introduced him to others on Twitter.

As he found he had wanted to work for companies, Johansen Twitter search to locate their employees. In this way, he found the head of human resources for Bulldog Solutions, a marketing agency in Austin. “I had been following their ballots and had an interest in working there,” he said. “I learned of their human resources director has been on Twitter, so I contacted her.” They met, she asked her resume – and he was hired.

“Much of the use of Twitter is that it allowed me to break the ice,” said Johansen. “For a job seeker, it is a way of saying:” I can show you that I am a real person, I see you are a real person, and we have a connection. From the employer side, they can see what a person is talking about when they are on Twitter and how they operate outside of work. ”

Johansen has laid off five months after it began, because of the economic slowdown. He jumped back on Twitter and was used to find freelance work.

“There is nothing revolutionary about such things,” said Flaherty. “It is evolutionary. Back in the day, we sent letters a few years later e-mails, and a few years later we have updated our blogs. The beauty of Twitter is that it’s as if you’re on a network if all the time, in real time. “

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Simple steps to stay private online

Simple steps to stay private online

Visitors to virtually every major website are tracked, but you can limit the snooping.

Visitors to almost every major website are tracked online, a Journal investigation has found. But there are ways to limit the snooping. Web browsing activity is tracked by use of “cookies,” “beacons” and “Flash cookies,” small computer files or software programs installed on a user’s computer by the Web pages that are visited. Some are useful. But a subset (“third party” cookies and beacons) are used by companies to track users from site to site and build a database of their online activities.

Major browsers including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome and Safari, have privacy features. To have the most privacy options, upgrade to the latest version of the browser you use.

Check and Delete Cookies: All popular browsers let users view and delete cookies installed on their computer. Methods vary by browser.

For instance on Internet Explorer 8 (the most widely used browser), go to the “Tools” menu, pull down to “Internet Options” and under the “General” tab there are options for deleting some or all cookies. There might be hundreds, so deleting all might be easiest. But the next time you visit a favorite site, you may need to retype passwords or other login data previously stored automatically by one of those cookies.

Adjust Browser Settings: Once you’ve deleted cookies, you can limit the installation of new ones. Major browsers let you accept some cookies and block others. To maintain logins and settings for sites you visit regularly, but limit tracking, block “third-party” cookies. Safari automatically does this; other browsers must be set manually.

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Common digital camera mistakes to avoid

Common digital camera mistakes to avoid

In many situations you can skip the flash, and there are some times you definitely shouldn’t use it. Here are some common mistakes to avoid.

1. Using very high ISO

For low light shooting, it’s tempting to crank the ISO up to its highest setting. But with many cameras, that will degrade the quality of the photos you snap. If your camera has manual controls, you can add more light to your shots by opening the aperture more widely (using a smaller f-number) and slowing the shutter speed (to, say, 1/125 or even 1/60 of a second). Slowing shutter speed can cause blurred images if your subject or camera moves too much, so it works best when your camera is stabilized and the subject is relatively still.

2. Trying to squeeze too many photos on the storage card

You can do this by lowering resolution or increasing compression, but both will reduce the quality of larger prints you make later, such as 5×7 or greater. Memory cards are cheap. It’s better to bring along extra storage and not compromise what may turn out to be lifetime memories.

3. Not reading the user manual

This will deprive you of features that could greatly improve the shots you take. Of course you won’t have time to read the manual when you’re standing in front of the Grand Canyon. That’s why you should brush up on it at home or while traveling to your destination.

4. Using flash when you shouldn’t

Flash can cause red-eye, wash out skin tones, and flatten scenes that ought to have depth. To avoid using flash, shoot with the sun or other light source to your back or move your subject closer to a window or other source of light. Using a slower shutter can also let you shoot in natural light, providing the subject and camera both remain quite still. When all else fails, turn up the ISO setting, but only as much as absolutely necessary. Never use flash on a subject more than a few feet away, as at a sporting event. All you’ll get is a dim subject with a black background.

5. Not bringing a spare battery

Even if you charged the battery the same morning, reviewing shots on the LCD and using flash can deplete it by late in the day. Exposure to cold can also reduce battery life. To be sure you don’t run out of gas just when some of your best photo ops present themselves, charge a spare and keep it on hand.

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Social media debate: A week without Facebook?

Social media debate: A week without Facebook?

One small college’s bold experiment draws praise, criticism, and even a jab on late-night TV.

A central Pennsylvania technological college with fewer students than many Facebook users have friends is blacking out social media for a week. The bold experiment at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology — which has drawn praise, criticism and even a jab on late-night TV — means students and staff can’t access Facebook, Twitter or a host of other ubiquitous social networks while on campus.

Provost Eric Darr said the exercise that began Monday is not a punishment for the school’s 800 students, nor a precursor to a ban, but a way for people to think critically about the prevalence of social media.

The blackout comes on the heels of a report that Web users in the U.S. spend more time socializing on Facebook than searching with Google, according to data released last week from researchers at comScore Inc.

Still, Darr said he can’t believe the controversy generated in the Twitterverse, blogosphere and academia, with some accusing the school of inflicting “a terrible thing and an infringement upon people’s rights.”

“By and large, the students are supportive of the whole exercise and don’t get so worked up over it,” Darr said.

On campus, attempts to log in to MySpace or LinkedIn return the message: “This domain is blocked.” E-mail, texting and other Web surfing is still allowed, but not instant-messaging.

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