Category: Social Media

Scared of the phone? You’re not alone

Scared of the phone? You're not alone

Does hearing the phone ring make you panic? Does the thought of making a call give you cold sweats?

We’re rarely separated from our mobile phones these days, but many people still suffer from a true, deep fear of making a phone call. Recognised as an offshoot of social anxiety disorder, telephobia afflicts people across countries and generations.

Those who suffer from telephobia might be comfortable delivering a talk in a room full of strangers or might send dozens of text messages a day, but get shivers when they need to talk on the phone.

“For a lot of people, getting on the phone is a particularly complex interaction,” says Jill Isenstadt, vice president of coaching for Joyable, which offers online therapy. “You have to think of things on the fly and you have to respond to what someone is saying to you.”

Have you managed to counteract telephobia? Share your tips and tricks with us on Facebook. Technologies that enable communication without directly speaking to someone, have made it easier to mask the problem of telephobia. As a result, the problem has become harder to spot, and there’s no hard data on the prevalence of telephobia. Ultimately, the fear of talking on the phone can have disastrous results for productivity or job mobility.

“We have clients who come in and are held back in their careers because they are anxious about interacting with other people,” says Isenstadt. “They avoid it until it becomes dire.”

Telephobia has been around well before the advent of smartphones. George Dudley and Shannon Goodson wrote The Psychology of Sales Call Reluctance in 1986. In his 1929 autobiography, British poet and writer Robert Graves writes about developing a deep fear of using the telephone after suffering an injury while serving in the First World War.

Isenstadt has seen more recent cases of telephobia. The phone produces anxiety in her clients for a variety of reasons. “It’s not about the phone itself, but it’s something about the interaction,” she says. “For some clients, the phone is another place where they might say the wrong thing.”

One of Isenstadt’s 27-year-old patients, who works in sales, worries about stumbling over her words or taking too long to respond, making her look foolish in front of clients and colleagues in nearby cubicles.

Another patient, a 52-year-old financial consultant, also worried about being judged and appearing unintelligent during phone calls. Instead, she defaulted to communicating with clients over email so that she could take time to compose and double check her responses.
Sales trainer Jeff Shore says that many sales professionals fear cold calling because they worry about harassing potential clients. As telemarketing took off, the phone started to be seen as a nuisance that interrupted family dinners and other personal time. Shore says that he works with people in sales who worry about “annoying people.”

“Sales people say ‘I don’t want to get those annoying phone calls,’” says Shore. “They say, ‘I don’t want to be that person.’”

In some cultures, people are apprehensive about talking on the phone, says Michael Landers, global director of Culture Crossing, a consultancy which advises groups and individuals working in a global context.

“In Japan there is a hesitancy [regarding] talking to someone you don’t know — they don’t want to offend someone or lose face,” says Landers. In Indonesia, where the average person sends about a hundred text messages every day, he says people are just less comfortable making calls.

Landers says that across cultures the fear of the phone closely relates to a fear of being rejected, whether that means asking for an appointment with someone or trying to close a deal. “I don’t know a culture that loves rejection,” he says. “It’s just how you define it.”

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How to destroy your digital history

How to destroy your digital history

We all have private information on our computers, phones and tablets. Whether of personal or professional origin, there’s some data that we’d rather no-one else got their hands on. But does deleting a file and emptying the recycle bin do the job?

According to data recovery expert Rob Winter at Kroll Ontrack, “deleting” the file is akin to removing an item from the contents page of a book – the chapter containing the all-important information is still there. For a specialist, it’s not even that hard to find.

Winter and his team are sometimes called out at short notice to help companies retrieve data from “wiped” drives and physically damaged computers.

It is difficult to believe any technology could have survived such a bashing – but in the next clip, discover just how much data (and even some embarrassing pictures) that Winter managed to retrieve from their sorry-looking hard drives.

Recovery services are highly sought-after by organisations who realise they have lost important files. After the 2003 space shuttle Columbia disaster, for example, specialists were able to recover 99% of the data from a Seagate drive found in the wreckage.

So remember, if you hit delete, all is not lost.

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Can your smartphone really handle all your finances?

Can your smartphone really handle all your finances?

Would you be prepared to manage all your finances through your smartphone?

This is the hope of many financial technology – fintech – start-ups aiming to transform our money management habits. They think we now trust our mobile technology enough to carry out banking, money transfers, investments and loan applications without ever stepping into a bank branch or writing a cheque.

But are they right? One start-up is going a step further, bringing many financial services together onto one app so that you have complete visibility of all your cash transactions in one place.

The app, called Bud, has been developed by 26-year-old Ed Maslaveckas. He says: “Many people simply don’t have the time or expertise to track down the apps that can help them manage their money.

“So we’ve created an independent, universal banking app for my generation and anyone else who wants to make their money work harder for them.”

Can your smartphone really handle all your finances?

The idea is that customers will be able to aggregate all their bank and credit card accounts into one place and switch money between them quickly and easily, as well as make payments to other people at the click of a button.

“The Bud app fits into a wider trend in the market as banks battle it out to make their online services as effortless as possible,” says John Rakowski, director of technology strategy at AppDynamics.
“As consumers become increasingly used to intuitive tools such as Siri and Google Now… the idea of using multiple apps to do their banking is becoming outdated.”

But Bud has its work cut out to raise awareness, given that its own research suggests nine out of 10 young people have never even heard of fintech.

Anna Laycock, lead strategist at the London-based Finance Innovation Lab, warns that while the market is exploding with innovative ideas, those that succeed will be the ones that people can easily understand and engage with.

“Companies need to be able to articulate how their products help people,” she says. “Anything that empowers people with information they can understand and that can help their money management is a positive development.”

‘In your face’

The advent of smartphones and apps has given the global financial services industry – and tech-based start-ups in particular – the opportunity to change the tone and style traditionally associated with finance, believes Mr Maslaveckas.

“For years financial services were loud and in your face. Companies were always trying to sell something to you that often wasn’t to your benefit,” he says. “We’re looking at things the other way round and offering people services that will benefit them.”

In June, Bank of England governor Mark Carney, said: “Fintech will change the nature of money, shake the foundations of central banking and deliver nothing less than a democratic revolution for all who use financial services.”

Smartphone-only banks, like Atom Bank and Mondo, are aimed at younger people comfortable running most of their lives on their phones. At the moment Mondo only offers prepaid debit cards that can be topped up at cash machines and online, but it hopes to get a full banking licence later this year. This will enable it to offer standing order, direct debit and faster payments features.

Money management apps such as Loot and Moven aim to help consumers set a budget and keep track of their spending. “You don’t need to be a professional finance manager to be really good with money,” reckons Mr Maslaveckas. “You can get control of your finances simply by making the most of the fintech innovations that are already available to you on your phone.”

High stakes

High claims, but is it a reality? There has certainly been an upturn in the number of new app-based fintech firms attracting serious investment across the world in the last few months.

Payments providers, peer-to-peer lenders, “robo advisers”, trading platforms, and foreign exchange companies have all been catching investors’ attention. For instance, global Bitcoin-based payment app Circle raised $60m (£45m) at the end of June in a cash-raising exercise led by Beijing-based venture capital company IDG Capital.

The company has launched a Chinese venture and plans major European expansion. And the aforementioned banking app Mondo raised £8m, some £1m of which was crowdfunded in just 96 seconds earlier this year. Globally, consultancy Accenture says fintech investment has risen from about $3.2bn in 2012 to $22.2bn in 2015, with the volume of deals nearly doubling over that period.

Innovation

Behind all this investment activity is the belief that technology is simplifying and democratising finance, putting control back into the hands of consumers.

Investment incubators, accelerators and innovation hubs are cropping up everywhere to encourage this flourishing sector.
For instance, Spanish banking giant Santander has set up a venture capital fund to back fintech start-ups working in areas that may improve its banking service.

“Any investments we make need to have potential commercial applications for Santander as a bank, and ultimately benefit our customers as the end users,” explains Mariano Belinky, managing partner at Santander InnoVentures.

Two fintech projects already up and running as a result of the investment are Ripple and Kabbage. The former allows banks to transfer international payments securely without the need for a middleman, while Kabbage provides quick online loans of up to £40,000 to small businesses.

But such convenience and flexibility doesn’t necessarily come cheap. A £40,000 Kabbage loan repayable over 10 months – the maximum period allowable – will cost you an additional £11,000. Hi-tech doesn’t always mean low-cost.

Fight back

Banks are having to respond to the fintech challenge with innovations of their own, whether that is voice biometrics or mobile codes for authentication purposes.

Some are experimenting with personalised video to improve customer service, while others are expanding the way they communicate, using social media platforms such as WeChat, Facebook Messenger and Whatsapp.

Others are even moving beyond banking. For example, Poland’s award-winning Idea Bank focuses on providing services to entrepreneurs, including a cloud-based space where people can work, meet and collaborate.

All this innovation should mean that, as Mr Carney said: “With time, fintech could mean a more open, more transparent, and more democratic global financial system.”

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Wisdom in 140 characters: Return of the aphorism?

Wisdom in 140 characters: Return of the aphorism?

“We each have two lives,” a wise person once said, “and the second begins when we realise we have only one.”

I can’t tell you which wise person, sadly; the internet attributes it in roughly equal measure to Confucius and Tom Hiddleston. (It’s not a very Confucian sentiment, so I’m going with Hiddleston.) But it hardly matters. It’s an aphorism, and like all the best ones, it feels as if it always existed, and only needed someone to discover it. Or rediscover it: judging by various new books and essays, this oldest of philosophical forms is making a comeback. Our era of dwindling attention spans and 140-character content-burps is generally held to be one of escalating stupidity. But it’s also ideally suited to aphorisms. So maybe we’ll end up imbibing some wisdom accidentally, too.

There are two species of aphorism, James Lough explains in Short Flights, a recent modern collection. The more irritating is the “instructional” kind: pompous nuggets on how to behave, of the sort dispensed by Benjamin Franklin. (“Early to bed and early to rise.” OK, we get it, Ben. You’re perfect.) Not all instructional aphorisms are terrible: “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle” is useful advice. But juicier by far are “aphorisms of insight”, which don’t tell us what to do, but radically shift our view of how things are. As Lough writes: “An insight aphorism is anarchic, a bomb exploding in an empty house, blasting out the windows, blowing the doors off their hinges.”

Of these, my favourites are the ones that land at first like a bucket of cold water, issuing a bleak assessment of life, yet turn out to contain a liberating truth. Take Rilke, translated by the Jungian psychologist James Hollis: “The purpose of life is to be defeated by ever greater things.” The economist Thomas Sowell: “There are no solutions; there are only tradeoffs.” (You’ll never solve all your problems. So which ones are worth putting up with, to solve the others?)

A line attributed to Joseph Campbell: “We must be willing to let go of the life we had planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.” Or the therapist Sheldon Kopp: “You are free to do whatever you like. You need only face the consequences.” And, yes, I’m aware these are all by men: aphorisms usually are. (The aphorists in Short Flights are three-quarters male.) I’m stereotyping, but I wonder if that’s partly because women writers are less fond of the glib signoff that silently follows every aphorism: “And that’s all that’s worth saying about that!”

But a good aphorism never really draws a line under things. Instead, it keeps on giving, unfolding further meanings. I’m convinced that Earle Hitchner’s quip – “Americans think 100 years is a long time, while the English think 100 miles is a long way” – explains more about transatlantic relations than you’d think. And the whole of human happiness may be encapsulated in Carl Rogers’s line: “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” There are whole books – lots of them – that don’t contain nearly that much wisdom.

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How to create a wifi connection to an iPad

How to create a wifi connection to an iPad

Learn to create a wifi connection for your iPad.

Connecting your iPad to the Internet is as easy as joining an available Wi-Fi network and entering your credentials if required. As one of the top tablets on the market today, the Apple iPad is a powerful tool that can be used for web browsing, video streaming, social networking, online gaming and so much more.

Getting Online With an Apple iPad

These instructions are generally applicable to all current models of the Apple iPad mini, iPad Air and iPad Pro, as well as other iOS devices like the iPhone and iPod touch.

  1. Turn on your iPad.

  2. Enter your lock screen code if required.

  3. Swipe through your home screens until you see Settings.

  4. Tap on Settings.

  5. Select Wi-Fi from the resulting list.

  6. Enable Wi-Fi by tapping on the radio button to the right. It should move the circle to the right and show as green.

How to create a wifi connection to an iPad

  1. Wait while the iPad searches for Wi-Fi networks in the area.

  2. Tap on the name of the network you want to use.

  3. If the network has a lock symbol next to its name, it is secured with a password. If there is no lock symbol, there is no password and this step can be skipped.

— After tapping on the network name, you will be prompted to enter this password.
— Tap on Join.
— Skip the next step.

  1. If it is a public Wi-Fi network, like at a coffee shop or at a hotel, you may need to proceed to a splash page to complete your connection. This is sometimes called a captive Wi-Fi network.

— Tap on the “i” icon next to the captive Wi-Fi network name.
— Tap on Join Network.
— On the resulting page, enter your credentials, sign into your account, or tap to accept the terms and conditions. Each captive network can be a little different in how it is presented.

  1. Once you are connected to the network, a blue checkmark symbol will appear next to the network name and the Wi-Fi symbol will appear at the top-left of the screen.
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Facebook uses AI to understand text-based posts

Facebook uses AI to understand text-based posts

Facebook has developed AI software to help understand what people are talking about in posts to the social network. The Deep Text engine can understand text with “near-human accuracy”, a Facebook blogpost explained.

It said the AI system was developed to help people get more out of the site and to help catch spam and other unwanted messages.
Deep Text is being tested with Facebook Messenger and to generate responses to certain search queries.

With Messenger, the system is primed to spot when people are talking about preparing to travel and this can lead to software robots – known as bots – asking if they need to call a cab.

Similarly, if someone writes that they have something to sell, Deep Text-based bots will grab information about what is being sold and its price and suggest the seller uses Facebook’s sales tools to make sure the ad reaches a wide audience.

Deep Text has emerged from work Facebook is doing on bots that can automatically help the site’s users. Future work will refine the AI engine’s ability to get at the deeper meanings of text so it can spot subtle connections between words such as “bro” and “brother” that are often missed by other language analysis tools, said Facebook.

Facebook uses AI to understand text-based posts

Rather than be directed by humans, the software has been allowed to learn about human language by itself and has built a conceptual map of how words are used and how they relate to each other.

The greater understanding of text could be useful when applied to lengthy text-based conversations that take place on Facebook to spot relevant or interesting comments. It will also be used to clean up message threads by weeding out spam or other unwanted replies.

Facebook also said it planned to use Deep Text to improve its understanding of what people like so it can refine the information and adverts they are shown.

Currently, said Facebook, Deep Text can analyse several thousand posts per second and can handle more than 20 languages.
Mike Murphy, writing on the Quartz tech news website, said there were dangers involved in mapping people’s interests ever more closely.

“As Facebook gets better at offering us personalised search results from our networks, as useful as those might be, it also keeps us in a more insular version of the web,” he wrote.

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A New Era of Social Networking Is Ahead

A New Era of Social Networking Is Ahead

The technological advancements in this modern generation are tremendous. Especially the software industry professionals are providing the endless solutions to every work. The work of human is greatly reduced with the help of software and it is majorly help us to accomplish our work very smartly.

This is the main reason for the success of the software industry. There are many industry-leading software companies are available all over the world. They are releasing their software products day by day to give competition to their opponents. When we compare to other fields communication area is majorly focused by them. This is due to the fact that the people are Increasingly looking for the better option for communicating with other people. That is why if you search in the Internet you can find thousands of applications for communication purposes. That may be for texting or to make voice calls or video calls etc.

Though the apps are available for this kind of communication the craze on social networks will never cease. Though many companies attempted to create social networking sites only very few of them have gained the attention of the people in this world. This is due the convenience and the flexibility of the site and its application. If the features are liked by the people then automatically it will get success easily among the people and it is started to use by them increasingly.

Till now we are using the social networks that are based on texts with the added features as photography. Now a new level of social network is going to be experience by us. We the younger generation will always look for the change in everything as we are easily bored with the same technology. To satisfy our exploring nature a new option is arriving. mango technologies is in the journey of producing a video social network.

Video social network is the next generation network that brings us to the advanced level of communication. It is going to make a revolution in the social networking system. The name of app that is going to provide such service is mimri. It is in the development phase and is getting ready to deployment. Hence promotions regarding the advent of mimri are increasingly seen in the internet. This is the new era and people are going to experience the great features if it. The techie world is eagerly waiting for the launch of mimri. Since it is totally related to the related to the video networking, the eagerness to know about the features of this new technology has trigged ripples among the people.

In order to make people to know about the launch of the application, an invite can be registered at the official website of mimri. When the app is ready an invite to download will be sent to you the email id or phone number that is provided for registration. So people can download them easily after the launch from the official website.

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How to save web pages on iPhone and Android

How to save web pages on iPhone and Android

Android and iOS are the most popular mobile operating systems in the world. Android is popular because of its flexibility. You can install and download things from wherever you want, whereas iOS is popular for its security settings and features it offers. Both of the operating systems have their advantages, but there are some similar things in both of them, too.

For example, people use their smartphone devices to watch videos, browse the Internet, chat with friends and much more. One thing which is common in between the two is the Web browsing. There are so many browsers available for them, and the majority of people often browse the Net from their mobile device. So if you came across something useful one day, and wanted to save it for further reading, then here in this post we are going to tell you about some of the working ways to save Web pages on iPhone and Android devices easily.

Using Pocket App

The pocket is one of the best services currently available to quickly save, discover, and recommend the best, most interesting stories on the Internet. The pocket is available for Android and as an extension for Chrome, which means you can also sync its data across your phone, tablet and computer. To save web pages on Android using Pocket, just install this app on your mobile and browse through the Web for your requirement.

If you found something interesting, then save it in your Pocket account and later, you can open the Pocket app to read it. The most surprising thing about Pocket app is that it offers unlimited storage to all of its users, so you can save web pages on Android without worrying about the storage. There is a Text-to-Speech feature in this app too by which you can listen to the text written on a particular page.

If you are using Google Chrome browser on Android device, then you can also use it to save web pages on your device. You don’t have to install any third party app to do it either. All you have to do is to open the webpage you want to save in Google Chrome, and then just click on the menu icon on the upper right corner side of the screen.

When you click on that button, a menu will pop up on your screen with some options in it. Just click on print button. Next, you will be taken to a new page where you can see several options. There will be a bubble with PDF written on it. Just click on it to save your web page as PDF. Next you have to choose a location where you want to save that web page. It can be your internal storage, external memory card or Google Drive.

Save Web Pages By Adding Them To Reading List

If you are using an iOS device like iPhone for browsing, and if you want to save web pages on it, then the simplest way to do that is by adding them to your reading list. Bookmarking pages can cause some problems as your data will be synced with your account, and if you lose access to the Internet, then you can’t open those bookmarks.

Instead, as I said earlier, iOS’s Reading List feature is so much helpful that you can take a snapshot of any web page and save it to your handset’s local storage for offline reading, or you can even sync your data with iCloud Storage. To save web pages in iPhone, just open the Safari browser and then open the web page you want to save. Now tap the action button (the square button with the arrow) at the bottom of the screen, then tap add to reading list.

bove mentioned methods to save web pages on Android work perfectly as we have tested them on our handsets too. Saving web pages on a mobile phone can be very helpful in many ways. For example, there are some services available to them which allow you to sync your mobile data with laptop or computer, so you can transfer them to your computer to read it on a bigger screen.

For web pages on iPhone, you can follow methods mentioned above as they are working (we have not yet tested them). If you know about any other method by which a person can easily save web pages on iPhone and Android, then do let us know about it via the comments section below.

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Here’s Microsoft’s new look Start menu for Windows 10

Here's Microsoft's new look Start menu for Windows 10

Microsoft has changed the look of the Start menu in Windows 10.

The revamped Start menu is due to be added to Windows 10 this summer, as part of a major update coined the ‘Windows 10 Anniversary Edition’.

Microsoft revealed the updated appearance in an early build of the OS, which it released to testers in the Windows 10 Insider program on Friday.

The new look Start menu makes the ‘All Apps’ list visible by default on the left-hand side. In another new addition, a selection of the user’s ‘Most-used’ apps are shown at the top of this permanently visible ‘All Apps’ list. Microsoft says the change should reduce the clicking and scrolling needed to access apps.

The Power, Settings and File Explorer icons are also always visible in the left rail of the Start menu and the ‘Recently added’ section will display three entries, instead of one. Any folders that users have added to the Start menu are now immediately accessible without having to click the hamburger icon.

The look of the Start menu in tablet mode has also been overhauled, turning the ‘All App’ list into a fullscreen menu, reminiscent of the Windows 8.1 Start screen. Gabe Aul, VP for Microsoft’s engineering systems team, says the switch to fullscreen was a ‘top request from Windows Insiders’, adding that ‘the grid-like implementation of the full-screen ‘All Apps’ list aims to provide efficiency while taking advantage of the additional real estate on the Start screen on a tablet’.

Here's Microsoft's new look Start menu for Windows 10

The final Start menu change is designed to make it easier to toggle between pinned tiles and the ‘All Apps’ list, by providing the option to do so in the menu’s left rail.

The latest Windows Insider build, 14328, also includes a raft of features that will be available to all users following the Anniversary Update.

These new components include Windows Ink, which allows users to more easily write notes on touchscreen PCs and tablets using a digital pen. The addition of Windows Ink to Windows 10 allows users to write on digital sticky notes, draw on digital whiteboards and annotate content in a variety of apps, including Maps, Microsoft Edge, and Office. Microsoft wants support for drawing and writing using a digital pen to be present in many Windows 10 apps and says that adding support for Windows Ink only requires developers to write two lines of code.

Windows 10’s digital assistant Cortana has also been tweaked. Users will no longer have to log into Windows to use Cortana and instead will be able to use voice commands to get Cortana to make notes, play music or set a reminder from the lock screen.

Cortana can now also be used to set photo reminders, for example the user could take a picture of a cheese they want to buy next time they’re in a store, and add reminders based on content from another Windows 10 app, for example telling a user to read an article they flagged as interesting in the Edge browser. Cortana is now also accessible to all users, with Windows 10 no longer requiring users to sign-in before they can ask simple questions of the digital assistant.

Other changes include the ability to search files on OneDrive cloud storage that aren’t synced locally, tweaks to the look of and what is displayed in the Action Center and via notifications, various changes to the Taskbar — including easier access to the calendar and the removal of the File Explorer icon, as well as updates to the Settings app and lock screen.

As this is an early build of Windows 10, some of these features may change before reaching the general public, based on feedback from testers in the Windows Insider program.

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Simple ways to develop public relations through social media

Simple ways to develop public relations through social media

Is it harder to develop relationships online than offline? Yes it is.

When you meet someone in person, you can look into their eyes and talk to them. You can really get a sense of the person. When you meet someone online, you are limited to seeing just what they have posted online. So, if you want to develop relationships online, then you need to do something more.

I have seen many posts lately on Facebook indicating that people are tired of the superficial nature of communication on social media. People are looking for opportunities to connect personally with people.

In my own business, I spend much of the day talking to people over the phone. I understand the value of having a personal conversation to really get to know someone and what they are struggling with. And that is the basis for understanding how you can help.

Here are a few quick tips to develop personal relationships online:

1) Develop relationships one at a time

One of the most effective ways to communicate with people on Facebook and other social media sites is to send them a private message. Keep your messages short and end with a question. I get too many messages from people who just spew details about their business in the first message.

Keep your messages brief and focus on making a connection. When you ask a question, it starts a dialogue. You want to have a series of short messages back and forth. This allows you to develop trust and rapport.

2) Have a system for contacting people

You need a simple system that will help you keep track of who to contact and who you have contacted.

Make a top ten list of people to contact and get started.
Add to your list over time.
Make a note after you have made contact.
Depending on the results, follow up in 60 to 90 days.

3) Move conversations offline over the phone
You can only accomplish so much online.

At a certain point, it makes sense to take the conversation offline. Suggest that you talk by phone. This is a great way to develop the relationship and accomplish more.

Begin the process of making personal contact with your friends and followers.
Move beyond the superficial nature of online conversations.
Step into the role of taking an interest in people and learning how to best help them.

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