‘Ninja Turtles 2’ Opens #1 with Soft $35M

'Ninja Turtles 2' Opens #1 with Soft $35M

The first weekend in June 2016 played out mostly as expected, with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows taking the #1 spot followed by last weekend’s first place finisher, X-Men: Apocalypse. Warner’s Me Before You, however, did manage to break out well above expectations while Universal’s Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping may have received great reviews, but couldn’t find much of an audience. Overall, the weekend was a wash compared to last year with estimates for the top twelve coming in just $56,118 higher than last year’s actuals, but there are still some highlights to discuss despite something of a slow start to a sequel driven June.

Paramount’s Ninja Turtles 2 brought in an estimated $35.25 million, which, as discussed in our weekend preview, puts the film pretty much right on the average for so many of today’s sequels based on the original film’s performance. In the case of Ninja Turtles, this is a 46% drop from the 2014 film’s $65.5 million opening. Considering the $135 million budget for Turtles 2 is $10 million more than was spent on the original, that’s not exactly what the studio was hoping for when they flipped the green light.

The sequel is now looking to bring in $90 million or so domestically, which is around $100 million less than the original. Of course, box office grosses are just half the story with a film like this as ancillary merchandise is a big revenue driver for a film of this sort. From a demographics perspective, the film did score an “A-” CinemaScore and audience members under the age of 18 made up 40% of the audience and scored the film with an “A”. In all, 52% of the audience was under 25 and 54% male vs. 48% female.

In addition to its domestic total, Ninja Turtles 2 also opened in 40 international markets and earned an estimated $34 million. The UK delivered the highest returns with an estimated $5.3 million followed by Russia ($4.8m), Mexico ($4.5m), Indonesia ($2.3m) and Malaysia ($2.2m). The movie will continue to expand throughout the month and will release in China on July 2 where the first film brought in over $62 million.

Angelina Jolie talks her Russian sleeper spy role in Salt

Angelina Jolie talks her Russian sleeper spy role in Salt

Angelina Jolie has been in the national capital during the weekend, promoting his new spy thriller, Salt (July 23). A year ago, she has managed to avoid the paps and observers as she turned in the Washington DC area.

Chase scenes for the movie, which opens July 23, were filmed with barricades holding hundreds of fans and photographers at a distance just out of camera view. Jolie plays the title role, CIA agent Evelyn Salt, who goes on the track after accusations that she is a sleeper agent in Russia.

“Salt and I did the same thing, ‘she laughs.” Just trying to keep their heads down and go from there. ”

In an interview Saturday, she also said recent remarks that she intended to leave the scene one day. Jolie, 35, said she has no plans to retire.

“I want to be very busy. I am a little excited. I did not sit well, “she said. “In the years to come, not that I’m retiring. There will simply fewer films at one time.

“And I do other things. I live in Africa for six months and fly planes. I see what there is to it. And artistically, I’m sure there’s something else to do. ”

Salt is her first film since 2008 and Changeling birth of her twins, Knox and Vivienne, who turn 2 today. Being a mother of six years with Brad Pitt and a return to Gunslinging fistfighting – often hung on the side of a building or jumping from a balcony on a stone floor – more difficult than expected.

“I had a moment of my first day because I had not worked for a year and a half and I was home and had babies,” says the actress, who is much more to soft voice and warm as his screen alter egos difficult. “I did my first day back and I thought, ‘What am I doing? I am the mother of someone! ‘

The young are not shocked to see his action game on the large scale, “she said. “I met Brad made waterfalls together (on the set of Mr. and Mrs. Smith), so we’re kind of this family,” she said. “It’s almost expected for mom to go out and do something like that.”

Part of the reason for his visit has been relatively calm keeping the team small strike. The whole family did not join her – that her daughters Zahara, 5, and Shiloh, 4, and they remained out of sight.

Jolie and Pitt try to movies at different times, then one of them is at home with the children. When traveling, it’s a chance for special attention, “she said. “For example, (the four older children) are all coming with me to Cancun, and then came back and spent much time with babies, because they could not come. Then the girls came to DC as a journey of girls. And boys, Pax and Maddox are having special time with dad boy “back in Los Angeles.

This means that the couple are not likely to co-star again, if she wanted Pitt to make an appearance in the salt. Even if it was a short scene, the stunt work, it would have taken too much time commitment, so he ended up with baby-sitting duties.

“He was almost going to be the guy that I bike flipped over and then call me a bad reputation,” she said, laughing. “But he was with the children that day, and we could not do it.”

Opening Friday: Dark Shadows

Opening Friday: Dark Shadows

Johnny Depp stars as vampire Barnabas Collins in an adaptation of the classic gothic soap opera.

In the year 1752, Joshua and Naomi Collins, with young son Barnabas, set sail from Liverpool, England to start a new life in America. But even an ocean was not enough to escape the mysterious curse that has plagued their family. Two decades pass and Barnabas has the world at his feet — or at least the town of Collinsport, Maine.

The master of Collinwood Manor, Barnabas is rich, powerful and an inveterate playboy… until he makes the grave mistake of breaking the heart of Angelique Bouchard. A witch, in every sense of the word, Angelique dooms him to a fate worse than death: turning him into a vampire, and then burying him alive.

Two centuries later, Barnabas is inadvertently freed from his tomb and emerges into the very changed world of 1972. He returns to Collinwood Manor to find that his once-grand estate has fallen into ruin. The dysfunctional remnants of the Collins family have fared little better, each harboring their own dark secrets. Matriarch Elizabeth Collins Stoddard has called upon live-in psychiatrist, Dr. Julia Hoffman, to help with her family troubles.

Also residing in the manor is Elizabeth’s ne’er-do-well brother, Roger Collins; her rebellious teenage daughter Carolyn Stoddard; and Roger’s precocious 10-year-old son, David Collins.

Opening Friday: Dark Shadows

Apollo 18 mission still being denied by NASA!

Apollo 18 mission still being denied by NASA!

Apollo 18 movie which The Weinstein Company has been touting as a “found footage” thriller, which consists of “actual footage” from a mysterious moon mission that never ‘officially’ took place, although many conspiracy theorists believe it did.

NASA has now taken its official stance, insisting Apollo 18 is a work of fiction. Here’s what NASA spokesperson Bert Ulrich had to say below.

“Apollo 18 is not a documentary. The film is a work of fiction, and we always knew that. We were minimally involved with this picture. We never even saw a rough cut. The idea of portraying the Apollo 18 mission as authentic is simply a marketing ploy. Perhaps a bit of a Blair Witch Project strategy to generate hype.”

However, Bert Ulrich does believe that NASA’s exposure in projects like Apollo 18 are beneficial for the agency, even if fictional. “It’s a wonderful way to reach the public through these huge media means like feature films and television shows, and it can inspire people in an interesting way, and it also can instruct people about what space exploration is all about.”

Apollo 18 was released September 2nd, 2011 and stars Warren Christie, Lloyd Owen. The film is directed by Gonzalo López-Gallego.

Apollo 18

Directed by: Gonzalo López-Gallego
Starring: Warren Christie, Lloyd Owen
Screenplay by: Brian Miller, Cory Goodman
Studio: The Weinstein Company
Release Date: September 2nd, 2011

Officially, Apollo 17, launched December 17th, 1972 was the last manned mission to the moon. But a year later, in December of 1973, two American astronauts were sent on a secret mission to the moon funded by the US Department of Defense. What you are about to see is the actual footage which the astronauts captured on that mission. While NASA denies its authenticity, others say it’s the real reason we’ve never gone back to the moon.

Everything you want to know about Apollo 18 Movie

Colombiana: Vengeance Is Beautiful

Colombiana: Vengeance Is Beautiful

Cataleya, a young woman who has grown up to be an assassin after witnessing the murder of her parents as a child. Turning herself into a professional killer and working for her uncle, she remains focused on her ultimate goal: to hunt down and get revenge on the mobster responsible for her parents’ deaths.

Colombiana is an American action film, co-written and produced by Luc Besson and directed by Olivier Megaton. The film stars Zoe Saldana in the lead role[4] with supporting roles performed by Michael Vartan, Cliff Curtis, Lennie James, Callum Blue, and Jordi Mollà.

In 1992, Bogota, Colombia, Fabio Restrepo (Jesse Borrego), has key information about drug lord Don Luis Sandoval (Beto Benites). However, Don Luis fears that Fabio will be pulling a hit on them, so he sends his henchman Marco (Jordi Mollà) to kill him. Fabio gives his nine-year-old daughter Cataleya (Amandla Stenberg) the information Don Luis wants and tells her it’s her “passport”; he also gives her the address of her Uncle Emilio (Cliff Curtis), a criminal in Chicago, who will take care of her if she finds herself alone.

The last thing he gives her is something that will keep her safe: his mom’s necklace, the cataleya orchid. Fabio tells her to sit at the kitchen table and not move no matter what. After saying their goodbyes, Fabio and his wife Alicia (Cynthia Addai-Robinson) leave to battle Marco and his men but both of them are gunned down as Cataleya listens from the kitchen. Marco tries to manipulate her into giving the information.

Colombiana: Vengeance Is Beautiful

When he asks what she wants, she stabs him in the hand with a kitchen knife, saying “To kill Don Luis”, and escapes. She safely makes it to the U.S. Embassy and gives the Embassy the information in exchange for a passport and passage to the United States. She escapes to the airport, where she makes it to the US and takes a bus to Chicago. Once she finds Emilio, Cataleya asks him to train her as an assassin.

Fifteen years later, a 24-year-old Cataleya (Zoe Saldana) has become an accomplished assassin. Her uncle serves as her broker, providing her with contracts. She is assigned to kill the notorious gangster Genarro Rizzo (Affif Ben Badra), who is currently in police custody. Implementing an elaborate plan, she gets herself arrested while dressed in a disguise. She manages to escape from her cell with tools she hid in her disguise, travel through the ventilation system, successfully kill Rizzo, and return to her cell. The next morning she is released.

Read Full Production Notes for Colombiana

Colombiana

Directed by: Olivier Megaton
Starring: Zoe Saldana, Michael Vartan, Cliff Curtis, Lennie James, Callum Blue, Jordi Mollà, Amandla Stenberg, Cynthia Addai-Robinson, Beto Benites, Ofelia Medina
Screenplay by: Luc Besson, Robert Mark Kamen
Production Design by: Patrick Durand
Cinematography by: Romain Lacourbas
Film Editing by: Camille Delamarre
Costume Design by: Olivier Bériot
Set Decoration by: Philippe Cord’homme, Ryan Martin Dwyer
Art Direction by: Gilles Boillot, Franckie Diago, Carlos Lagunas, Pascal Leguellec, Fanny Stauff
Music by: Nathaniel Méchaly, Craig Walker
MPAA Rating: PG-13 for violence, disturbing images, intense sequences of action, sexuality and brief strong language.
Studio: Sony Pictures
Release Date: August 31, 2011

Narrow win for ‘Apes’ at the box office

Narrow win for 'Apes' at the box office

“Planet of the Apes” nabbed the No. 1 spot, but “The Help” was close on its tail.

Rebellious apes have held off Southern maids for a narrow win at the weekend box office.

Studio estimates Sunday pegged “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” at $27.5 million, good enough for its second-straight No. 1 finish. The 20th Century Fox release raised its 10-day domestic total to $104.9 million.

The “Planet of the Apes” prequel came in just ahead of “The Help,” a drama about Mississippi maids during the civil-rights movement that debuted at No. 2 with $25.5 million. “The Help,” a DreamWorks release distributed by Disney, has taken in $35.4 million domestically since opening Wednesday.

The Warner Bros. horror sequel “Final Destination 5,” the latest in the franchise where death stalks victims who had been fated to die earlier, opened at No. 3 with $18.4 million.

The weekend’s other two new wide releases had soft openings. Sony’s action comedy “30 Minutes or Less,” starring Jesse Eisenberg as a pizza deliveryman forced to help rob a bank, was No. 5 with $13 million, just behind Sony’s surprise animated smash “The Smurfs,” which slipped to fourth-place with $13.5 million and lifted its three-week total to $101.5 million.

The singers from TV’s “Glee” failed to find a big-screen audience as 20th Century Fox’s “Glee: The 3D Concert Movie” opened outside the top-10, finishing at No. 11 with just $5.7 million. The concert film was shot during the cast’s recent North American tour.

“Rise of the Planet of the Apes” and “The Help” have exceeded their studios’ early box-office expectations. Both received strong reviews, “Apes” for surprising drama amid dazzling visual effects to create the simians, “The Help” for great performances from Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Octavia Spencer and their co-stars in the adaptation of the best-seller about black maids who go public with stories about working for often racist white employers.

“You’ve really got to see it to believe it because of the effects,” Fox distribution executive Chris Aronson said of “Apes.” ”The combination of the effects and an emotional story makes for a very satisfying trip to the movies.”

The “Apes” prequel added $40.5 million overseas, raising its international total to $75 million and worldwide haul to nearly $180 million.

Female crowds made up 74 percent of the audience for “The Help,” and 60 percent of viewers were older than 35. That’s a sign “The Help” could have a long shelf life at theaters, since women and older audiences tend to get drawn to films through word-of-mouth rather than rushing out over opening weekend the way young crowds do.

“The Help” already has far outpaced the $20 million Disney executives hoped for over the first five days, and the film is playing strongly in both urban and middle America markets, said Dave Hollis, the studio’s head of distribution.

“The book and the way it kind of rose to the best-seller list was very much this word-of-mouth, viral thing where people say, ‘you’ve got to read this thing I just read,’ and we’re hoping the movie can do the same kind of thing,” Hollis said.

“The Smurfs” also has outstripped expectations. The family hit added $60 million overseas to raise its worldwide total to $242 million, and Sony announced a sequel over the past week.

“We were ready to make the second one before we even released the first,” said Rory Bruer, head of distribution for Sony. “We felt confident it was going to work, but I don’t think anybody had any idea it was going to work to this level.”

Overall domestic business increased for the fifth-straight weekend. Revenues totaled $152 million, up 6 percent from the same weekend last year, when “The Expendables” led with $34.8 million, according to box-office tracker Hollywood.com.

“We’re ending the summer on a high note,” said Hollywood.com analyst Paul Dergarabedian. “The usually unsung month of August can be the time when a lot of unexpected things happen that benefit the box office.”

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Hollywood.com. Where available, latest international numbers are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday.

1. “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” $27.5 million ($40.5 million international).
2. “The Help,” $25.5 million.
3. “Final Destination 5,” $18.4 million.
4. “The Smurfs,” $13.5 million ($60 million international).
5. “30 Minutes or Less,” $13 million.
6. “Cowboys & Aliens,” $7.6 million ($7 million international).
7. “Captain America: The First Avenger,” $7.1 million ($12.2 million international).
8. “Crazy, Stupid, Love,” $6.93 million.
9. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2,” $6.9 million ($30 million international).
10. “The Change-Up,” $6.2 million.

‘The Help’ author was rejected 60 times

Kathryn Stockett was rejected 60 times

Kathryn Stockett’s best-selling book is now a movie, but it was almost nipped in the bud.

If you ask my husband my best trait, he’ll smile and say, “She never gives up.” But if you ask him my worst trait, he’ll get a funny tic in his cheek, narrow his eyes and hiss, “She. Never. Gives. Up.”

It took me a year and a half to write my earliest version of The Help. I’d told most of my friends and family what I was working on. Why not? We are compelled to talk about our passions. When I’d polished my story, I announced it was done and mailed it to a literary agent.

Six weeks later, I received a rejection letter from the agent, stating, “Story did not sustain my interest.” I was thrilled! I called my friends and told them I’d gotten my first rejection! Right away, I went back to editing. I was sure I could make the story tenser, more riveting, better.

A few months later, I sent it to a few more agents. And received a few more rejections. Well, more like 15. I was a little less giddy this time, but I kept my chin up. “Maybe the next book will be the one,” a friend said. Next book? I wasn’t about to move on to the next one just because of a few stupid letters. I wanted to write this book.

A year and a half later, I opened my 40th rejection: “There is no market for this kind of tiring writing.” That one finally made me cry. “You have so much resolve, Kathryn,” a friend said to me. “How do you keep yourself from feeling like this has been just a huge waste of your time?”

That was a hard weekend. I spent it in pajamas, slothing around that racetrack of self-pity—you know the one, from sofa to chair to bed to refrigerator, starting over again on the sofa. But I couldn’t let go of The Help. Call it tenacity, call it resolve or call it what my husband calls it: stubbornness.

After rejection number 40, I started lying to my friends about what I did on the weekends. They were amazed by how many times a person could repaint her apartment. The truth was, I was embarrassed for my friends and family to know I was still working on the same story, the one nobody apparently wanted to read.

Sometimes I’d go to literary conferences, just to be around other writers trying to get published. I’d inevitably meet some successful writer who’d tell me, “Just keep at it. I received 14 rejections before I finally got an agent. Fourteen. How many have you gotten?”

By rejection number 45, I was truly neurotic. It was all I could think about—revising the book, making it better, getting an agent, getting it published. I insisted on rewriting the last chapter an hour before I was due at the hospital to give birth to my daughter. I would not go to the hospital until I’d typed The End. I was still poring over my research in my hospital room when the nurse looked at me like I wasn’t human and said in a New Jersey accent, “Put the book down, you nut job—you’re crowning.”

It got worse. I started lying to my husband. It was as if I were having an affair—with 10 black maids and a skinny white girl. After my daughter was born, I began sneaking off to hotels on the weekends to get in a few hours of writing. I’m off to the Poconos! Off on a girls’ weekend! I’d say. Meanwhile, I’d be at the Comfort Inn around the corner. It was an awful way to act, but—for God’s sake—I could not make myself give up.

In the end, I received 60 rejections forThe Help. But letter number 61 was the one that accepted me. After my five years of writing and three and a half years of rejection, an agent named Susan Ramer took pity on me. What if I had given up at 15? Or 40? Or even 60? Three weeks later, Susan sold The Help to Amy Einhorn Books.

The point is, I can’t tell you how to succeed. But I can tell you how not to: Give in to the shame of being rejected and put your manuscript—or painting, song, voice, dance moves, [insert passion here]—in the coffin that is your bedside drawer and close it for good. I guarantee you that it won’t take you anywhere. Or you could do what this writer did: Give in to your obsession instead.

And if your friends make fun of you for chasing your dream, remember—just lie.

Cowboys vs Smurfs: Photo finish at the box office

Cowboys vs Smurfs: Photo finish at the box office

“Cowboys & Aliens” was supposed to win the weekend easily, but “Smurfs” puts up a fight.

In one of the biggest box office upsets in recent memory, Sony’s kids pic The Smurfs tied with DreamWorks/Universal’s Cowboys & Aliens for No. 1, with each pic claiming a $36.2 million opening. The winner won’t be decided until Monday morning.

Heading into the weekend, Cowboys held a wide lead over the competition, according to tracking. Universal itself believed the movie, directed by Jon Favreau, would open in the $40 million to $45 million range.

Smurfs, meanwhile, was only expected to open in the $25 million to $30 million range.

One trouble spot for Cowboys, starring Daniel Craig and Harrison Ford, was a tepid turnout by younger moviegoers. A full 75% of the audience was over the age of 25, and 39%, over the age of 50.

That was always a risk, considering the film is a blend of two genres: Westerns, which skew older, and sci-fi.

Cowboys, which received a B CinemaScore, couldn’t have better pedigree. Stacey Snider and Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks oversaw production and co-financed the $163 million pic with Universal and Ryan Kavanaugh’s Relativity Media. Brian Grazer and Ron Howard’s Imagine Entertainment also produced the film.

The film’s financial success will depend upon good legs and a top performance overseas, where it is rolling out slowly.

Smurfs cost $110 million to produce, and is the latest entry in the CGI/live-action market. The pic received an A- CinemaScore, and A among moviegoers under the age of 18.

The Smurfs is the latest CGI/live-action hybrid to hit the big screen. Costing $110 million to produce, the kids pic should gross in the mid-$20 million range.

Based on the comic books and wildly popular 1980s television show, The Smurfs stars Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays and Hank Azaria. The voice cast is led by Jonathan Winters, Katy Perry and Anton Yelchin.

Sony believes Smurfs will have strong legs throughout August. The movie also is off to a strong start overseas, where it opened in Spain this weekend.

The weekend’s third new offering, Warner Bros.’ Steve Carell-Ryan Gosling comedy Crazy, Stupid, Love opened to $19.3 million for a No. 5 finish.

Bad Teacher Movie Exclusive

Bad Teacher Movie Exclusive

Some teachers just don’t give an F. For example, there’s Elizabeth (Cameron Diaz). She’s foul-mouthed, ruthless, and inappropriate. She drinks, she gets high, and she can’t wait to marry her meal ticket and get out of her bogus day job. When she’s dumped by her fiancé, she sets her plan in motion to win over a rich, handsome substitute (Justin Timberlake) – competing for his affections with an overly energetic colleague, Amy (Lucy Punch). When Elizabeth also finds herself fighting off the advances of a sarcastic, irreverent gym teacher (Jason Segel), the consequences of her wild and outrageous schemes give her students, her coworkers, and even herself an education like no other.

“Elizabeth isn’t a teacher because it’s noble – it’s just a job, a necessity: she has to pay the rent,” says Cameron Diaz, who plays a teacher redefining education in Bad Teacher. “In fact, her whole motivation is to find a way that she never has to teach again.”

When the idea for the movie came to the screenwriting team of Gene Stupnitsky & Lee Eisenberg, they knew they’d hit on something incredibly rare and special. “It seemed like there weren’t a lot of comedy roles for women,” says Eisenberg. “We would see so many funny women on ‘Saturday Night Live’ and on talk shows, and they’d be hysterical and charming, and then we’d go to the movies and they’d be props to get two guys to become friends or whatever. We really wanted to write a project for a comedienne.”

Elizabeth Halsey’s Top Ten Teaching Tips

1. There is no heel too high, no sweater too tight, no neckline too low. Besides, it’s nothing these kids haven’t seen on the internet.

2. Movies are the new books. You would be surprised how educational Stand By Me and Dangerous Minds really are.

3. Stay hydrated: keep a bottle of your favorite liquor in your desk drawer.

4. For those moments when the booze doesn’t cut it, keep an emergency J in your purse. It’s medicinal, and it’s OK as long as you do it in the gym.

5. Always be honest with your students. If they suck, they should know.

6. Get your rest. If you stayed out too late the night before, sleep in class.

7. Throwing things at your students prepares them for the real world.

8. If you are the school’s top fundraiser, they expect you to skim a little off the top.

9. Cut corners wherever you can. Like top ten lists… just do nine. No one will notice.

Amy Squirrel’s Top Ten Teaching Tips

1. Alexander Pope once wrote, “A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.” Like, duh!

2. Whitney Houston once sang, “I believe the children are our future,” and I truly, truly believe that. Truly.

3. Anything your students bring you is something they have obviously poured their heart and soul into and deserves your full attention. And probably a place on your wall.

4. Method teach. Get into character and engage your students by incorporating voices, costumes and charades to get their attention. Trust me, your students won’t think it’s lame.

5. You are a role model and the students take their behavioral cues from you. So take any opportunity to chaperone a school event.

6. Keeping a close eye on your lunch quadrant is next to Godliness.

7. Diverting from the lesson plan could affect a student’s future. Treat your curriculum like the bible.

8. Try giving your students an apple for once… After all, we learn as much from them as they do from us.

9. You will find that there are other teachers who are not committed to the profession as you are. If you need a secret satisfaction, just remind yourself that you are a better person than they are.

10. Never talk about that thing that happened in 2008.

11. Always give a little more than what they asked for.

Read Full Production Notes

Smurfs: Welcome to Central Park, New York

Smurfs: Welcome to Central Park, New York

Audiences everywhere are in for a Smurfy good time as the Smurfs make their first 3D trip to the big screen. When the evil wizard Gargamel chases the tiny blue Smurfs out of their village, they tumble from their magical world and into ours – in fact, smack dab in the middle of Central Park. Just three apples high and stuck in the Big Apple, the Smurfs must find a way to get back to their village before Gargamel tracks them down.

Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays, Sofia Vergara, and Hank Azaria star on camera opposite an all-star voice cast. Anton Yelchin will play Clumsy Smurf; comedy legend Jonathan Winters, who voiced roles in the “Smurfs” television series, will voice Papa Smurf; Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Katy Perry will play Smurfette; Alan Cumming will play Gutsy Smurf; “SNL’s” Fred Armisen will voice Brainy Smurf; and George Lopez will play Grouchy Smurf.

In the live-action roles, Azaria will play the Smurfs’ nemesis, the evil wizard Gargamel. Harris and Mays star as an expectant couple whose lives are turned upside down when the Smurfs cross over from their magical village to New York City. Vergara plays Odile, Harris’s boss, a cosmetics executive.

The Smurfs

Directed by: Raja Gosnell
Starring: Sofia Vergara, Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays, Anthon Yelchin, Alan Cumming, Meg Phillips, Adria Baratta
Screenplay by: J. David Stem, David N. Weiss
Production Design by: Bill Boes
Cinematography by: Phil Meheux
Film Editing by: Sabrina Plisco
Costume Design by: Rita Ryack
Set Decoration by: Elise de Blois, Regina Graves
Art Direction by: Chris Shriver, Christian Wintter
Music by: Heitor Pereira
Studio: Columbia Pictures
Release Date: July 29, 2011

Read Full Production Notes