Wisdom in 140 characters: Return of the aphorism?

Wisdom in 140 characters: Return of the aphorism?

“We each have two lives,” a wise person once said, “and the second begins when we realise we have only one.”

I can’t tell you which wise person, sadly; the internet attributes it in roughly equal measure to Confucius and Tom Hiddleston. (It’s not a very Confucian sentiment, so I’m going with Hiddleston.) But it hardly matters. It’s an aphorism, and like all the best ones, it feels as if it always existed, and only needed someone to discover it. Or rediscover it: judging by various new books and essays, this oldest of philosophical forms is making a comeback. Our era of dwindling attention spans and 140-character content-burps is generally held to be one of escalating stupidity. But it’s also ideally suited to aphorisms. So maybe we’ll end up imbibing some wisdom accidentally, too.

There are two species of aphorism, James Lough explains in Short Flights, a recent modern collection. The more irritating is the “instructional” kind: pompous nuggets on how to behave, of the sort dispensed by Benjamin Franklin. (“Early to bed and early to rise.” OK, we get it, Ben. You’re perfect.) Not all instructional aphorisms are terrible: “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle” is useful advice. But juicier by far are “aphorisms of insight”, which don’t tell us what to do, but radically shift our view of how things are. As Lough writes: “An insight aphorism is anarchic, a bomb exploding in an empty house, blasting out the windows, blowing the doors off their hinges.”

Of these, my favourites are the ones that land at first like a bucket of cold water, issuing a bleak assessment of life, yet turn out to contain a liberating truth. Take Rilke, translated by the Jungian psychologist James Hollis: “The purpose of life is to be defeated by ever greater things.” The economist Thomas Sowell: “There are no solutions; there are only tradeoffs.” (You’ll never solve all your problems. So which ones are worth putting up with, to solve the others?)

A line attributed to Joseph Campbell: “We must be willing to let go of the life we had planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.” Or the therapist Sheldon Kopp: “You are free to do whatever you like. You need only face the consequences.” And, yes, I’m aware these are all by men: aphorisms usually are. (The aphorists in Short Flights are three-quarters male.) I’m stereotyping, but I wonder if that’s partly because women writers are less fond of the glib signoff that silently follows every aphorism: “And that’s all that’s worth saying about that!”

But a good aphorism never really draws a line under things. Instead, it keeps on giving, unfolding further meanings. I’m convinced that Earle Hitchner’s quip – “Americans think 100 years is a long time, while the English think 100 miles is a long way” – explains more about transatlantic relations than you’d think. And the whole of human happiness may be encapsulated in Carl Rogers’s line: “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” There are whole books – lots of them – that don’t contain nearly that much wisdom.

Facebook uses AI to understand text-based posts

Facebook uses AI to understand text-based posts

Facebook has developed AI software to help understand what people are talking about in posts to the social network. The Deep Text engine can understand text with “near-human accuracy”, a Facebook blogpost explained.

It said the AI system was developed to help people get more out of the site and to help catch spam and other unwanted messages.
Deep Text is being tested with Facebook Messenger and to generate responses to certain search queries.

With Messenger, the system is primed to spot when people are talking about preparing to travel and this can lead to software robots – known as bots – asking if they need to call a cab.

Similarly, if someone writes that they have something to sell, Deep Text-based bots will grab information about what is being sold and its price and suggest the seller uses Facebook’s sales tools to make sure the ad reaches a wide audience.

Deep Text has emerged from work Facebook is doing on bots that can automatically help the site’s users. Future work will refine the AI engine’s ability to get at the deeper meanings of text so it can spot subtle connections between words such as “bro” and “brother” that are often missed by other language analysis tools, said Facebook.

Facebook uses AI to understand text-based posts

Rather than be directed by humans, the software has been allowed to learn about human language by itself and has built a conceptual map of how words are used and how they relate to each other.

The greater understanding of text could be useful when applied to lengthy text-based conversations that take place on Facebook to spot relevant or interesting comments. It will also be used to clean up message threads by weeding out spam or other unwanted replies.

Facebook also said it planned to use Deep Text to improve its understanding of what people like so it can refine the information and adverts they are shown.

Currently, said Facebook, Deep Text can analyse several thousand posts per second and can handle more than 20 languages.
Mike Murphy, writing on the Quartz tech news website, said there were dangers involved in mapping people’s interests ever more closely.

“As Facebook gets better at offering us personalised search results from our networks, as useful as those might be, it also keeps us in a more insular version of the web,” he wrote.

A New Era of Social Networking Is Ahead

A New Era of Social Networking Is Ahead

The technological advancements in this modern generation are tremendous. Especially the software industry professionals are providing the endless solutions to every work. The work of human is greatly reduced with the help of software and it is majorly help us to accomplish our work very smartly.

This is the main reason for the success of the software industry. There are many industry-leading software companies are available all over the world. They are releasing their software products day by day to give competition to their opponents. When we compare to other fields communication area is majorly focused by them. This is due to the fact that the people are Increasingly looking for the better option for communicating with other people. That is why if you search in the Internet you can find thousands of applications for communication purposes. That may be for texting or to make voice calls or video calls etc.

Though the apps are available for this kind of communication the craze on social networks will never cease. Though many companies attempted to create social networking sites only very few of them have gained the attention of the people in this world. This is due the convenience and the flexibility of the site and its application. If the features are liked by the people then automatically it will get success easily among the people and it is started to use by them increasingly.

Till now we are using the social networks that are based on texts with the added features as photography. Now a new level of social network is going to be experience by us. We the younger generation will always look for the change in everything as we are easily bored with the same technology. To satisfy our exploring nature a new option is arriving. mango technologies is in the journey of producing a video social network.

Video social network is the next generation network that brings us to the advanced level of communication. It is going to make a revolution in the social networking system. The name of app that is going to provide such service is mimri. It is in the development phase and is getting ready to deployment. Hence promotions regarding the advent of mimri are increasingly seen in the internet. This is the new era and people are going to experience the great features if it. The techie world is eagerly waiting for the launch of mimri. Since it is totally related to the related to the video networking, the eagerness to know about the features of this new technology has trigged ripples among the people.

In order to make people to know about the launch of the application, an invite can be registered at the official website of mimri. When the app is ready an invite to download will be sent to you the email id or phone number that is provided for registration. So people can download them easily after the launch from the official website.

Simple ways to develop public relations through social media

Simple ways to develop public relations through social media

Is it harder to develop relationships online than offline? Yes it is.

When you meet someone in person, you can look into their eyes and talk to them. You can really get a sense of the person. When you meet someone online, you are limited to seeing just what they have posted online. So, if you want to develop relationships online, then you need to do something more.

I have seen many posts lately on Facebook indicating that people are tired of the superficial nature of communication on social media. People are looking for opportunities to connect personally with people.

In my own business, I spend much of the day talking to people over the phone. I understand the value of having a personal conversation to really get to know someone and what they are struggling with. And that is the basis for understanding how you can help.

Here are a few quick tips to develop personal relationships online:

1) Develop relationships one at a time

One of the most effective ways to communicate with people on Facebook and other social media sites is to send them a private message. Keep your messages short and end with a question. I get too many messages from people who just spew details about their business in the first message.

Keep your messages brief and focus on making a connection. When you ask a question, it starts a dialogue. You want to have a series of short messages back and forth. This allows you to develop trust and rapport.

2) Have a system for contacting people

You need a simple system that will help you keep track of who to contact and who you have contacted.

Make a top ten list of people to contact and get started.
Add to your list over time.
Make a note after you have made contact.
Depending on the results, follow up in 60 to 90 days.

3) Move conversations offline over the phone
You can only accomplish so much online.

At a certain point, it makes sense to take the conversation offline. Suggest that you talk by phone. This is a great way to develop the relationship and accomplish more.

Begin the process of making personal contact with your friends and followers.
Move beyond the superficial nature of online conversations.
Step into the role of taking an interest in people and learning how to best help them.

Google’s new project is unlike anything else

Google's new project is unlike anything else

Google’s newest project is finally out of the invitational period, meaning you can get your hands on it. What is it exactly? Meet Project Fi, the company’s own wireless network meant to remove all the pain and hassle from traditional wireless companies.

It works pretty simply: You sign up for the service and pick one of the three phones available — the Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, and Nexus 6. You’ll then have to wait for the phone and SIM card to be mailed to you. Not to worry, you won’t be charged for any service until you activate the SIM card.

The basic package for Project Fi costs just $20 for unlimited domestic talk and text, unlimited international texting, and WiFi tethering. Currently, Project Fi is offering $150 off the Nexus 5X if you purchase the phone through them. Not a bad deal for a relatively new phone. Ahead, you’ll find other details about the service and our review.

Google's new project is unlike anything else

Choosing a date plan

During the setup process, you get to choose how many GB of data you want to use.

It’s $10 per GB, so if you add 4 GB, you’ll be paying an additional $40.

If you end up not using most of your data during the billing cycle, Project Fi will then credit you back the amount of money you’re owed. Any data you use on a public WiFi connection is also secured through encryption.

The same idea applies to the basic talk and text package. If for some reason you end up using your phone for only half the month and then cancel the service, you’ll only be charged for the amount you used.

What Google hopes with this project

Google hopes you’ll choose Project Fi over all the other wireless providers for several reasons.

Firstly, the company boasts it has the best wireless connection around. It tries to find you the fastest network by bouncing back and forth between Sprint, T-Mobile, and WiFi networks. The idea is if you’re moving around and suddenly T-Mobile has a faster connection, you’ll seamlessly be transferred over to that network. This also means you can start a call on a WiFi network, walk outside, and still keep talking without any issues.

You can also use the phone internationally and not pay anything extra for data. Yes, you read that right. Project Fi will still only charge you $10 per GB, so even if you hop over to London for vacation, you don’t need to worry about any roaming data charges. This perk is available in 120 countries.

You can easily add more data to your plan on the Project Fi app or the website. It also only takes three steps to pause your service and only a few more to completely cancel it.

If you need any help at all, Project Fi does have 24/7 customer support via chat, phone, or email. The calls are answered in about 20 seconds.

Keeping old cell phone plan

We were given the chance to try out Project Fi with the Nexus 6P and were left slightly impressed.

If you’re converting from iOS to Android, there will be an adjustment period getting used to it. However, the phone is relatively easy to understand, and the fingerprint reader on the back of the phone is actually more useful than the home button reader on the iPhone.

As for Project Fi itself, don’t expect a totally seamless connection constantly. Several times my texts weren’t sent due to a poor or no connection — even in dense, open areas. You might even get connected to a 3G network.

Despite the cons, I’m staying optimistic on Project Fi — mostly for the ability to pay for only the data I use. I’m one of those remaining few lucky users who still has unlimited data, so I never think about it. With Project Fi, I still don’t have to. As it turns out, I don’t consume as much data as I think I do, and having the ability to check my data usage on the Project Fi app is a relatively anxiety-free way to see how I’m doing. I have nine days remaining in my plan, and I think I’ll actually get credit back. It’s almost like a treat from Project Fi.

So yes, I will keep waiting to see whether Project Fi completely improves and does not drop any phone calls or texts. Then, maybe I’ll consider switching over. Though to be honest, the service, while meant for millennials, is a good option for parents and grandparents who don’t need that much data and can manage it easily if they do.

How Facebook is turning into a giant digital graveyard?

How Facebook is turning into a giant digital graveyard?

At some point, there will be more dead Facebook users than living ones – and for those left behind, it is transforming how we experience the death of those around us.

Observing that phenomenon is a strange thing. There she is, the person you love – you’re talking to her, squeezing her hand, thanking her for being there for you, watching the green zigzag move slower and slower – and then she’s not there anymore.

Another machine, meanwhile, was keeping her alive: some distant computer server that holds her thoughts, memories and relationships. While it’s obvious that people don’t outlive their bodies on digital technology, they do endure in one sense. People’s experience of you as a seemingly living person can and does continue online.

How is our continuing presence in digital space changing the way we die? And what does it mean for those who would mourn us after we are gone?

The numbers of the dead on Facebook are growing fast. By 2012, just eight years after the platform was launched, 30 million users with Facebook accounts had died. That number has only gone up since. Some estimates claim more than 8,000 users die each day. At some point in time, there will be more dead Facebook users than living ones. Facebook is a growing and unstoppable digital graveyard.

How Facebook is turning into a giant digital graveyard?

Many Facebook profiles announce their owners have passed; they are “memorialised”. The profile is emblazoned with the word “remembering”, and they stop appearing in public spaces, like People You May Know or birthday reminders.

But not all Facebook users who have passed away are memorialised.
Kerry, one of my college dorm mates, killed himself a few years ago, and his wife and family and friends regularly post updates on his page, and when they do, Kerry’s profile populates in my Facebook feed.

Neither Kerry nor my Aunt Jackie are memorialised, which means, for all intents and purposes, their deaths haven’t been recognised by Facebook, or by the unwitting users who chance upon them. Their digital identities continue to exist.

Social media has taught us about the power of the moment – connecting right now with people around the globe over awards show, television programmes, football games, social justice issues, and whatnot. But now it may be time to consider what comes after all that: our legacy.

It used to be that only certain prominent people were granted legacies, either because they left written records for their forebears, or because later inquisitive minds undertook that task. But digital technology changes that. Now, each of us spends hours each week – more than 12, according to a recent survey – writing our autobiographies.

As I’ve told my mother, my grandchildren may be able to learn about her by studying her Facebook profile. Assuming the social network doesn’t fold, they won’t just learn about the kinds of major life events that would make it into my mom’s authorised biography.

They’ll learn, rather, the tiny, insignificant details of her day to day life: memes that made her laugh, viral photos she shared, which restaurants she and my father liked to eat at, the lame church jokes she was too fond of. And of course, they’ll have plenty of pictures to go with it. By studying this information, my grandchildren will come to know about their great grandmother.

We might think of our public social media record as some type of digital soul: those perusing my Facebook know my religious beliefs, my political reservations, my love for my partner, my literary tastes. Were I to die tomorrow, my digital soul would continue to exist.

In the past few years, several tech companies have extended the idea of a digital soul. Eterni.me, launched in 2014, promises to create a digital version of “you” that will live on after your death. Death is certain, admits the website — but what if you could live forever as a digital avatar, “and people in the future could actually interact with your memories, stories and ideas, almost as if they were talking to you?”

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

If you’re among the millions of people seeking work, there is more of a social networking site that you may have to join Twitter.

Twitter? For the job search? In the history of Kyle Flaherty. He left a job in marketing at Boston determined to find a job in-house public relations. He tweeted about his decision and included a link to her professional blog, where he described the kind of work he sought. A few days later, his tweet was retweeted. In other words, knowledge was passed – to his current boss.

“I do not think I got it if not for Twitter,” said Flaherty, who moved from Boston to Austin, Texas, for the new job with a pregnant woman and a two year old son.

Twitter basics

Twitter, as you probably know, is the social networking site that lets you send tweets – the equivalent of text messages or status updates from Facebook, but limited to 140 characters. You must keep them very short and simple. To register, simply fill out an online profile. Then you can send tweets and view on your computer, cell phone or mobile internet device. Unlike Facebook, you can follow (receive tweets from) someone, there is no formal process of requesting and accepting.

When you register to monitor tweets from someone, they see that you’re next. It’s a good thing, because they may decide to reciprocate and follow you, too, which is something you want if you are a professional trying to get noticed.

“Twitter gives you access to people you might not otherwise meet or encounter,” says Miriam Salpeter, Career Coach and founder of Keppie Careers in Atlanta.

Join the conversation

Needless to say, not everyone has a job simply tweeting on their employment status. But Twitter, like LinkedIn, Facebook, and industry conferences, is a way to reach out and reach out to people who know the hiring managers or you can submit them.

Many people use Twitter to share ramblings blind, like “having a hamburger with friends this afternoon.” But the most clever Twitterers use to comment on events in their professions. Tweets they follow industry leaders and even to establish informal relations following one another.

If you have never used Twitter, do not sign up immediately and furnaces people with a message saying that you are unemployed. Instead, create a slow dynamics. Open an account and include something about your profession in your username. Since users can search by subject tweets is a way to make your feed more visible.

“I automatically follow back anyone who has a job or jobs in their title,” says Salpeter, whose name is keppie_careers Twitter.

In the profile section, add a few lines about what you do professionally – which also contributes to your searchable.

Before start tweeting, research leaders in your industry, the companies you want to work, and any other professional contacts. Follow them. Many companies – including marketing, public relations, and technology – using Twitter to post job offers, and many hiring managers tweet, too.

“You can hear about jobs, an idea for a business to determine how to interact with them and see how you fit in,” Flaherty said.

Make an impression

Then, start tweeting. Give your opinion on the news, industry events, and seminars. If someone is following you, especially a leader in the industry, says something controversial or interesting, retweet (before), or send the person a direct answer. This may be an ideal way to get a conversation, but more personal.

If you are a hiring manager in a company you want to work out what he or she writes and then adapt your tweets to comment on such things.

This is what John Johansen did when he decided he wanted to leave Boston for a more affordable. It targets marketing professionals in Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, and Austin – and began following their tweets. When someone in the media said something very interesting, he replied with a message @ – public comment. This helped him develop relationships with marketing professionals in the cities. In turn, introduced him to others on Twitter.

As he found he had wanted to work for companies, Johansen Twitter search to locate their employees. In this way, he found the head of human resources for Bulldog Solutions, a marketing agency in Austin. “I had been following their ballots and had an interest in working there,” he said. “I learned of their human resources director has been on Twitter, so I contacted her.” They met, she asked her resume – and he was hired.

“Much of the use of Twitter is that it allowed me to break the ice,” said Johansen. “For a job seeker, it is a way of saying:” I can show you that I am a real person, I see you are a real person, and we have a connection. From the employer side, they can see what a person is talking about when they are on Twitter and how they operate outside of work. ”

Johansen has laid off five months after it began, because of the economic slowdown. He jumped back on Twitter and was used to find freelance work.

“There is nothing revolutionary about such things,” said Flaherty. “It is evolutionary. Back in the day, we sent letters a few years later e-mails, and a few years later we have updated our blogs. The beauty of Twitter is that it’s as if you’re on a network if all the time, in real time. “

Simple steps to stay private online

Simple steps to stay private online

Visitors to virtually every major website are tracked, but you can limit the snooping.

Visitors to almost every major website are tracked online, a Journal investigation has found. But there are ways to limit the snooping. Web browsing activity is tracked by use of “cookies,” “beacons” and “Flash cookies,” small computer files or software programs installed on a user’s computer by the Web pages that are visited. Some are useful. But a subset (“third party” cookies and beacons) are used by companies to track users from site to site and build a database of their online activities.

Major browsers including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome and Safari, have privacy features. To have the most privacy options, upgrade to the latest version of the browser you use.

Check and Delete Cookies: All popular browsers let users view and delete cookies installed on their computer. Methods vary by browser.

For instance on Internet Explorer 8 (the most widely used browser), go to the “Tools” menu, pull down to “Internet Options” and under the “General” tab there are options for deleting some or all cookies. There might be hundreds, so deleting all might be easiest. But the next time you visit a favorite site, you may need to retype passwords or other login data previously stored automatically by one of those cookies.

Adjust Browser Settings: Once you’ve deleted cookies, you can limit the installation of new ones. Major browsers let you accept some cookies and block others. To maintain logins and settings for sites you visit regularly, but limit tracking, block “third-party” cookies. Safari automatically does this; other browsers must be set manually.

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Social media debate: A week without Facebook?

Social media debate: A week without Facebook?

One small college’s bold experiment draws praise, criticism, and even a jab on late-night TV.

A central Pennsylvania technological college with fewer students than many Facebook users have friends is blacking out social media for a week. The bold experiment at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology — which has drawn praise, criticism and even a jab on late-night TV — means students and staff can’t access Facebook, Twitter or a host of other ubiquitous social networks while on campus.

Provost Eric Darr said the exercise that began Monday is not a punishment for the school’s 800 students, nor a precursor to a ban, but a way for people to think critically about the prevalence of social media.

The blackout comes on the heels of a report that Web users in the U.S. spend more time socializing on Facebook than searching with Google, according to data released last week from researchers at comScore Inc.

Still, Darr said he can’t believe the controversy generated in the Twitterverse, blogosphere and academia, with some accusing the school of inflicting “a terrible thing and an infringement upon people’s rights.”

“By and large, the students are supportive of the whole exercise and don’t get so worked up over it,” Darr said.

On campus, attempts to log in to MySpace or LinkedIn return the message: “This domain is blocked.” E-mail, texting and other Web surfing is still allowed, but not instant-messaging.

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Social Media in the near future

Social Media in the near future

Let’s call them Tweetscoops. Lady Gaga recently used Twitter to share the name of her upcoming album, ARTPOP, and George Michael let the word out on Twitter that he would be performing at the Olympic Games Closing Ceremony.

They’re not the only folks sharing big news on Twitter or Facebook, which circulates by “bird of mouth.” Some schools already are using Twitter to provide minute-by-minute updates about weather closings, crime situations on campus, admission deadlines, and other information. But if more professors start using Twitter to make major announcements, students could see it happening in these ways:

1. New assignments

Student confidentiality will keep professors from tweeting grades, but they could use #assignment and link to research, a news article, or another reading assignment students need to complete before the next class. Or maybe quick extra credit opportunities could be posted too.

2. Pop quizzes

Whether in class or online, professors could give students a quick heads-up minutes before class starts that they’ll be taking a pop quiz.

3. Required reading

Consider it higher education breaking news: The list of books for the semester could be released via Twitter before you even come to class. Now, will it cause you to actually buy them ahead of time?

4. Syllabus

It’s an essential first-day step — getting the course syllabus. But professors can go ahead and share the syllabus on Twitter, getting it out to students as soon as possible so you can be prepared for the course requirements. It also could help you make the decision earlier to keep or drop the course.

5. Office hours

Professors have designated office hours, but let’s say they have an unexpected break in the day and want to open their doors to students. With Tweets, they could let students know they’re available to help with test prep questions and more. Or they could even hold office hours via Twitter, too.