Plan a career switch this summer

Plan a career switch this summer

Use some free time to take online classes and work toward a new degree.

Thinking of switching careers or adding some skills to your resume? Looking for the right time to go back to school and get your degree? Summertime may be the right time to get started.

Summer classes are quickly becoming a popular option for college students of all kinds, according to Kyle Brown, director of online learning at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Canton.

Summer enrollment at SUNY Canton, for example, has jumped nearly 300 percent over the past four years, says Brown. Much of that growth is due to the fact that 90 percent of its summer classes are available online.

Want to use the summer to get a head start on your education? We’ve spotlighted some of the fastest growing careers through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, and separated them into three different career categories. Using this data, we also included the most common degree or preparation needed in each career. Keep reading to see why summertime may be the right time to start these programs…

Head Start Option 1: Health Care Programs

Looking for a red hot degree program to start this summer? Consider pursuing a degree in health care. With health care reform in full swing, it’s an exciting time to dive into this rewarding profession.

Associate’s in Medical Assisting
Medical Assistant – $29,450

Dental Assisting Certificate
Dental Assistant – $34,000

Associate’s in Nursing
Registered Nurse – $66,530

Did You Know? Ten of the 20 fastest growing jobs in the country through 2018 are in health care, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, and nursing and medical assisting careers are on the list!

Head Start Option 2: Business Programs

Looking to give your career a boost? Start the process this summer and consider studying business. As a whole, the industry is showing positive signs of heating up. In March 2011, small businesses in the U.S. added 50,000 new jobs, according to the Intuit Small Business Employment Index.

Bachelor’s in Accounting
Accountant – $67,430

Bachelor’s in Business
Personal Financial Advisor – $94,180

Master of Business Administration
Marketing Manager – $120,070

Did You Know? Personal financial advisors are enjoying a 30 percent increase in employment opportunities through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Head Start Option 3: Technology Programs

Summer is a perfect time to start gaining the skills one would need to start a career in technology, which is an industry always in search of the next hot thing. What it will be isn’t clear, but it’s safe to say that professionals with a background in technology will be behind it, just like they were for Twitter, iPads, and the like.

Bachelor’s in Information Systems
Computer Support Specialist – $47,360

Bachelor’s in Network Administration
Network Systems Administrator – $70,930

Bachelor’s in Computer Science
Computer Programmer – $74,690

Did You Know? Network systems analysts are enjoying a whopping 53 percent increase in employment opportunities through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

The best jobs outside the cubicle

The best jobs outside the cubicle

If you fantasize about working away from an office, one of these jobs might be for you.

The winter blues are starting to settle, leaving more than one inhabitant of the cabin to look longingly beyond the half gray walls that surround three sides, wondering what else is there.

In fact, there is a little freshness and jobs in demand outside of the cell. Some capitalize on the demand for health care as baby boomers age, while others capitalize on trends in technology and social media. Whatever the reason, these jobs are not bound by the rules Dilbert-Oniani.

“I think many people secretly fantasizing about the freedom that working outside the office provides, ” said Jeremy Redleaf, a filmmaker and creator of employment Odd Job Nation. “Employment outside the cab allows the freedom to build the life you want.”

Question answering virtual

The economy may improve, but companies are still trying to cut costs – and one of the ways they do this is to reduce the number of full-time employees physically in the office, and taking advantage thrust to move more business online.

“We have seen a proliferation of e-businesses looking for ‘virtual field agents” to answer basic questions in real time or write articles on simple tasks, “Redleaf said.” Although it is a great way to make money anywhere, it’s not for slow typists or fatigability -. It is a game volume when they pay per response ”

An ad for a virtual answering question on craigslist appeal to the interests of job seekers to get paid for things they already do: “Do you spend your day watching random things online can be paid for it are we? ” looking for people to respond to questions received by the mobile service most popular in the country. We receive thousands of questions each time and people need to put online and find the answers. You must be at least eighteen years of age and especially his ability to use different search engines. Country-by-question, “the announcement read.
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20-somethings create their own jobs

20-somethings create their own jobs

In today’s economy, you can’t just wait around for someone to hire you, say young entrepreneurs.

Five years ago, after graduating from New York University with a film degree and thousands of dollars in student loans, Scott Gerber moved back in with his parents on Staten Island. He then took out more loans to start a new-media and technology company, but he didn’t have a clear market in mind; the company went belly up in 2006.

“It made me feel demoralized and humiliated,” he says. “I wondered if this was really what post-collegiate life was supposed to be like. Did I do something wrong? The answers weren’t apparent to me.”

Still in debt, Mr. Gerber considered his career options. His mother kept encouraging him to get a “real” job, the kind that comes with an office and a boss. But, using the last $700 in his bank account, he decided to start another company instead.

With the new company, called Sizzle It, Mr. Gerber vowed to find a niche, reduce overhead and generally be more frugal. The company, which specializes in short promotional videos, was profitable the first year, he says.

Mr. Gerber, now 27, isn’t a millionaire, but he’s paid off his loans and doesn’t have to live with his parents (he rents an apartment in Hoboken, N.J.). And he thinks his experience can help other young people who face a daunting unemployment rate.

In October, Mr. Gerber started the Young Entrepreneur Council “to create a shift from a résumé-driven society to one where people create their own jobs,” he says. “The jobs are going to come from the entrepreneurial level.”

The council consists of 80-plus business owners across the country, ages 17 to 33. Members include Scott Becker, 23, co-founder of Invite Media, an advertising technology firm recently acquired by a Google unit; Lauren Berger, 26, founder of the Intern Queen, a site that connects college students with internships; Aaron Patzer, the 30-year-old who sold Mint.com to Intuit for $170 million; and Josh Weinstein, 24, who started CollegeOnly.com, a social networking site that is backed by a PayPal founder.

The council, which has applied for nonprofit status, serves as a help desk and mentoring hotline for individual entrepreneurs. People can also submit questions on subjects like marketing, publicity and technology, and each month a group of council members will answer 30 to 40 of them in business publications like The Wall Street Journal and American Express Open Forum, and on dozens of small business Web sites.

Council members assert that young people can start businesses even if they have little or no money or experience. But whether those start-ups last is another matter. Roughly half of all new businesses fail within the first five years, according to federal data. And the entrepreneurial life is notoriously filled with risks, stresses and sacrifices.

But then again, unemployment is 9.8 percent; Mr. Gerber’s in-box is flooded with e-mails from young people who have sent out hundreds of résumés for corporate jobs and come up empty. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, only 24.4 percent of 2010 graduates who applied for a job had one waiting for them after graduation (up from 19.7 percent in 2009). What do some people have to lose?

THE lesson may be that entrepreneurship can be a viable career path, not a renegade choice — especially since the promise of “Go to college, get good grades and then get a job,” isn’t working the way it once did. The new reality has forced a whole generation to redefine what a stable job is.

“I’ve seen all these people go to Wall Street, and those were supposed to be the good jobs. Now they are out of work,” says Windsor Hanger, 22, who turned down a marketing position at Bloomingdale’s to work on HerCampus.com, an online magazine. “It’s not a pure dichotomy anymore that entrepreneurship is risky and other jobs are safe, so why not do what I love?”