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How to use Twitter when you search for a job

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

If you’re among the millions of people seeking work, there is more of a social networking site that you may have to join Twitter.

Twitter? For the job search? In the history of Kyle Flaherty. He left a job in marketing at Boston determined to find a job in-house public relations. He tweeted about his decision and included a link to her professional blog, where he described the kind of work he sought. A few days later, his tweet was retweeted. In other words, knowledge was passed – to his current boss.

“I do not think I got it if not for Twitter,” said Flaherty, who moved from Boston to Austin, Texas, for the new job with a pregnant woman and a two year old son.

Twitter basics

Twitter, as you probably know, is the social networking site that lets you send tweets – the equivalent of text messages or status updates from Facebook, but limited to 140 characters. You must keep them very short and simple. To register, simply fill out an online profile. Then you can send tweets and view on your computer, cell phone or mobile internet device. Unlike Facebook, you can follow (receive tweets from) someone, there is no formal process of requesting and accepting.

When you register to monitor tweets from someone, they see that you’re next. It’s a good thing, because they may decide to reciprocate and follow you, too, which is something you want if you are a professional trying to get noticed.

“Twitter gives you access to people you might not otherwise meet or encounter,” says Miriam Salpeter, Career Coach and founder of Keppie Careers in Atlanta.

Join the conversation

Needless to say, not everyone has a job simply tweeting on their employment status. But Twitter, like LinkedIn, Facebook, and industry conferences, is a way to reach out and reach out to people who know the hiring managers or you can submit them.

Many people use Twitter to share ramblings blind, like “having a hamburger with friends this afternoon.” But the most clever Twitterers use to comment on events in their professions. Tweets they follow industry leaders and even to establish informal relations following one another.

If you have never used Twitter, do not sign up immediately and furnaces people with a message saying that you are unemployed. Instead, create a slow dynamics. Open an account and include something about your profession in your username. Since users can search by subject tweets is a way to make your feed more visible.

“I automatically follow back anyone who has a job or jobs in their title,” says Salpeter, whose name is keppie_careers Twitter.

In the profile section, add a few lines about what you do professionally – which also contributes to your searchable.

Before start tweeting, research leaders in your industry, the companies you want to work, and any other professional contacts. Follow them. Many companies – including marketing, public relations, and technology – using Twitter to post job offers, and many hiring managers tweet, too.

“You can hear about jobs, an idea for a business to determine how to interact with them and see how you fit in,” Flaherty said.

Make an impression

Then, start tweeting. Give your opinion on the news, industry events, and seminars. If someone is following you, especially a leader in the industry, says something controversial or interesting, retweet (before), or send the person a direct answer. This may be an ideal way to get a conversation, but more personal.

If you are a hiring manager in a company you want to work out what he or she writes and then adapt your tweets to comment on such things.

This is what John Johansen did when he decided he wanted to leave Boston for a more affordable. It targets marketing professionals in Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, and Austin – and began following their tweets. When someone in the media said something very interesting, he replied with a message @ – public comment. This helped him develop relationships with marketing professionals in the cities. In turn, introduced him to others on Twitter.

As he found he had wanted to work for companies, Johansen Twitter search to locate their employees. In this way, he found the head of human resources for Bulldog Solutions, a marketing agency in Austin. “I had been following their ballots and had an interest in working there,” he said. “I learned of their human resources director has been on Twitter, so I contacted her.” They met, she asked her resume – and he was hired.

“Much of the use of Twitter is that it allowed me to break the ice,” said Johansen. “For a job seeker, it is a way of saying:” I can show you that I am a real person, I see you are a real person, and we have a connection. From the employer side, they can see what a person is talking about when they are on Twitter and how they operate outside of work. ”

Johansen has laid off five months after it began, because of the economic slowdown. He jumped back on Twitter and was used to find freelance work.

“There is nothing revolutionary about such things,” said Flaherty. “It is evolutionary. Back in the day, we sent letters a few years later e-mails, and a few years later we have updated our blogs. The beauty of Twitter is that it’s as if you’re on a network if all the time, in real time. “

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Social media debate: A week without Facebook?

Social media debate: A week without Facebook?

One small college’s bold experiment draws praise, criticism, and even a jab on late-night TV.

A central Pennsylvania technological college with fewer students than many Facebook users have friends is blacking out social media for a week. The bold experiment at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology — which has drawn praise, criticism and even a jab on late-night TV — means students and staff can’t access Facebook, Twitter or a host of other ubiquitous social networks while on campus.

Provost Eric Darr said the exercise that began Monday is not a punishment for the school’s 800 students, nor a precursor to a ban, but a way for people to think critically about the prevalence of social media.

The blackout comes on the heels of a report that Web users in the U.S. spend more time socializing on Facebook than searching with Google, according to data released last week from researchers at comScore Inc.

Still, Darr said he can’t believe the controversy generated in the Twitterverse, blogosphere and academia, with some accusing the school of inflicting “a terrible thing and an infringement upon people’s rights.”

“By and large, the students are supportive of the whole exercise and don’t get so worked up over it,” Darr said.

On campus, attempts to log in to MySpace or LinkedIn return the message: “This domain is blocked.” E-mail, texting and other Web surfing is still allowed, but not instant-messaging.

Read more

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Social Media in the near future

Social Media in the near future

Let’s call them Tweetscoops. Lady Gaga recently used Twitter to share the name of her upcoming album, ARTPOP, and George Michael let the word out on Twitter that he would be performing at the Olympic Games Closing Ceremony.

They’re not the only folks sharing big news on Twitter or Facebook, which circulates by “bird of mouth.” Some schools already are using Twitter to provide minute-by-minute updates about weather closings, crime situations on campus, admission deadlines, and other information. But if more professors start using Twitter to make major announcements, students could see it happening in these ways:

1. New assignments

Student confidentiality will keep professors from tweeting grades, but they could use #assignment and link to research, a news article, or another reading assignment students need to complete before the next class. Or maybe quick extra credit opportunities could be posted too.

2. Pop quizzes

Whether in class or online, professors could give students a quick heads-up minutes before class starts that they’ll be taking a pop quiz.

3. Required reading

Consider it higher education breaking news: The list of books for the semester could be released via Twitter before you even come to class. Now, will it cause you to actually buy them ahead of time?

4. Syllabus

It’s an essential first-day step — getting the course syllabus. But professors can go ahead and share the syllabus on Twitter, getting it out to students as soon as possible so you can be prepared for the course requirements. It also could help you make the decision earlier to keep or drop the course.

5. Office hours

Professors have designated office hours, but let’s say they have an unexpected break in the day and want to open their doors to students. With Tweets, they could let students know they’re available to help with test prep questions and more. Or they could even hold office hours via Twitter, too.

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Beware of your social media history

Beware of your social media history

One firm collects everything you may have said or done online in the past seven years.

Companies have long used the criminal background checks, credit reports and even research on Google and LinkedIn to probe the past lives of potential employees. Now, some companies are requiring job applicants also pass a background check of social media.

A start-up years, social intelligence, scrapes the internet for all potential employees may have said or done online in the last seven years.

He then assembles a dossier with examples of professional awards and charitable work, as well as negative information that meets specific criteria: proof online racist remarks, references to drugs, sexually explicit images, messages text or videos, flagrant displays of weapons or bombs and clearly identifiable violent activity.

“We are not detectives,” said Max Drucker, CEO of the company, based in Santa Barbara, Calif. “All that we climb is what is publicly available on the Internet today.”

The Federal Trade Commission, after initially raising concerns last fall about Social Business Intelligence, the company is determined in accordance with the Act, the Fair Credit Reporting, but the service still alarms privacy advocates who say that invites employers to view information that may not be relevant to job performance.

And what a flattering relevant information has led to job offers being withdrawn or not? Mr. Drucker said that a prospective employee was found using Craigslist to look for OxyContin. A woman posing nude in the pictures she has set up a site for sharing the picture did not get the job she was looking for in a hospital.

Other background reports have been found examples of people who are anti-Semitic comments and racist remarks, he said. Then there was the job seeker who belonged to a Facebook group, “is America. I would not have to press 1 for English.” This raises a question. “Does that mean you do not like people who do not speak English?” Asked Dr. Drucker rhetoric.

Mr. Drucker said that his goal was to conduct pre-employment to help companies meet their obligation to conduct fair hiring practices and consistent while protecting the privacy of job applicants.

For example, he said reports remove references to religion of any person, race, marital status, sexual orientation, disability and other information protected by federal employment, where companies are not supposed to ask about during interviews. In addition, applicants must first consent to background checks, and they are informed of any adverse information found.

It supports research to reduce the risk that employers may confuse the candidate working with someone else or displayed on the Information Society that is not legally admissible or relevant. “Googling someone is ridiculously unfair,” he said. “An employer may discriminate against someone inadvertently. Or worse, they face all kinds of allegations of discrimination.”

Marc S. Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, based in Washington, said that employers have the right to gather information to make a decision on the expertise of job-related, but concerned that “employers should not judge what people do in their private life away from the workplace.”

Less than a third of the surface data firm Mr. Drucker just like the major social platforms like Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. He said most of the negative information about job candidates comes from web searches found deep to comment on blogs and messages on small social sites like Tumblr, the blogging site, as well as Yahoo user groups, e-commerce sites, message boards and even Craigslist.

Then there are the photos and videos that people post – or are tagged in – on Facebook and YouTube and other sharing sites like Flickr, Picasa, Photobucket and Yfrog.

And there are pictures and videos that seem to get most people in need. “Sexually explicit pictures and videos are beyond understanding,” Mr. Drucker said. “We see such blatant displays of weapons. And we see a lot of illegal activities. Many, many pictures of drug use. ”

He recalled a man who had 15 pages of photos to show with different guns, including an assault rifle. Another man included pictures of himself standing in a greenhouse with a large marijuana plants.

Given the complex “conditions of service” agreements on most sites and Web applications, said Rotenberg people do not realize that comments or content that they generate are publicly available.

“People are led to believe that there is more limited communication that there is indeed, in many cases,” he said, noting that frequent changes to Facebook’s privacy settings in recent years may put people at risk to find a job today because of the personal information they may have inadvertently made public.

“What Facebook did was to take personal information from people they have available to family and friends and make this information more widely available to potential employers,” said Mr. Rotenberg, whose organization has several complaints pending at the Federal Trade Commission on the privacy settings of Facebook.

Joe Bontke, outreach manager for the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Houston, said he regularly reminds employers and human resource managers about the risks of violation of federal rules and laws against discrimination in employment using the online search in hiring decisions.

“The things you can not ask in an interview are the same things that you can not research,” he said, which includes the full range of information on the age of a person, sex, religion, disability, national origin and race.

However, he added that 75 percent of recruiters are required by their companies to research candidates online. And 70 percent of recruiters in the report that the United States they have rejected candidates because of information online, he said.

Dave Clark, owner of Advanced Impulse Communications, a telecommunications company in Southern California, began to rely on social intelligence for screening background, because it said the company needed a formal strategy and standards before assembling information online about candidates. “They provided us a standardized arm’s length how to use this additional information to make better hiring decisions,” he said.

About half of all businesses, based on government and private investigations, are now using credit reports as part of the hiring process, except in states that limit or restrict their use. As with background checks of social media, there are concerns about information that appeared. The equal employment agency filed a lawsuit last December against the Company Kaplan Higher Education, accusing it of discrimination against black job seekers in the way we use credit history in its hiring process.

But it is not unusual for senior high-level executives in many companies to submit to background checks even more complete by a private firm to survey.

“We live in a world where you have an incredible amount of information and data on all officers,” said Ann Blinkhorn, an executive recruiter in the converging technologies, media and communications industry. “I think it puts the burden on the recruiter and the hiring manager to be truly reflected on what is important and not important in the hiring decision.”

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More employees visiting social networks at work

More employees visiting social networks at work

Although several companies are regulating social networking sites, employees are finding ways around the blocks of security, according to a new survey by Trend Micro.

The survey included 1600 users in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany and Japan, found the world of social networking at work increased by 19 per cent in 2008 to 24 percent in 2010. The largest increase in social networking in the workplace over the past two years has been found among users in the United Kingdom, which had an increase of 6 percent, and Germany with an increase of 10 percent.

“Social networking is an extremely important tool for both personal and professional relationship-building. And while most companies’ concerns about social networks in the central office in the loss of employee productivity, they can not understand is that many social networking sites are built on technologies interactive give unlimited opportunities for cybercriminals exploit end users, stealing personal identities and professional, and corrupt corporate networks from malicious software, “said David Perry, global director of education for Trend Micro.

“With the right security solutions and guidelines for social networking implemented, there is no reason why companies choose to allow their employees the opportunity to visit these sites should be too exposed to these risks.”

Excluding Japan, there were no major differences between users and small businesses from large companies, but the investigation revealed laptop users are much more likely than users to visit the local sites social networking. Overall, the use of social networks through laptops rose 8 percent from 2008 to 2010. In the U.S., it rose 10 percent and in Germany, up 14 percent.

In 2010, 29 percent of laptop users, compared to 18 per cent of desktop users surveyed said they visited these sites at work. In Japan, 2010, employees of small businesses were much more likely than large companies to visit social networking sites – 21 percent of small firms compared to 7 percent of large companies.

For all countries surveyed in 2010, users of phones that can connect to the Internet outside the corporate network are more likely to share confidential information via instant messaging, e-mail and social applications that media which are always connected to the corporate network.

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How you’ll find your next job in recession time

How you'll find your next job in recession time

Most job seekers have the best chance of finding a job through friends and contacts, given that nearly one third of external hires were found through referrals, despite the multitude of ways for companies to find job applicants. This suggests that, despite millions of CVs drawn across the Web during the past two years, the time for job seekers could be better spent knocking their friends for occasions where they work.

Online sites for job search are fully aware of this dilemma, the search for employment has changed considerably online, but hiring still relies on old relationships, they are finding new ways to allow both methods.

You can find your next job with a school friend who lost a long time with you reconnected on Facebook. In job search site SimplyHired.com, a partner of U.S. News, job seekers can connect to their Facebook accounts and allow Simply Hired access to details of work history profiles of friends. ” The site then lists all your friends and their employers. Click on their employers, and you will see all job openings currently listed on Simply Hired.

You can send a message to a friend directly over the opening. The site also shows that companies employ the largest number of your friends, cities that friends are more likely to live in, and employment in companies that you indicated a preference in your Facebook profile. Simply Hired is not the only search engine offering a chance to find a job through friends Facebook Indeed.com has a Facebook application that allows users to watch the openings where their friends work.

“The basic idea here is that the world when you look in the offline and you start a job search, you usually go to a number of friends and say,” Do you know of any major companies? Are there good jobs in your company that you know? “Said Simply Hired CEO Gautam Godhwani. “That was how much of the recruitment was done in the past. … And I think that is what you see here, you are seeing Simply Hired take what has always been a very efficient process offline and upload. “Simply Hired earlier launched an application for LinkedIn that allow users to check if they have connections to employers that they are interested in.

Integration with Facebook may not be meaningful in the early years of the site where it was largely the domain of college students who were there to socialize. Today, with nearly half a billion users, Facebook is the personal mark for turf professionals and middle-aged Generation Y will-and-comers. It is a place where businesses all new products and track job applicants. Despite all the controversy privacy, most users still choose to include personal stories and working details on their profiles. “I think we are entering a new era of job search is much, much more personalized,” Godhwani said. “The foundation said that today’s users have much more information about themselves Online. ”

The company has followed the debate about privacy, Godhwani said. On the one hand, integration Simply Hired leaves no trace on your profile so your Facebook friends do not know what you are looking for a job. Therefore, the objective of privacy for most users is the control and integration of Simply Hired is opt-in only.

Accessibility is an area of ongoing development among search engines work. Job Search Site LinkUp.com is currently awaiting approval of an application for Apple iPad would allow users to search for jobs, create job alerts and job Email to similar functions Friends of those applications LinkUp smartphones, but it is much easier to apply for jobs directly on the IPAD, Thanks to its size. The goal is to transform LinkUp as unemployed transform-“regardless of their usage patterns and behaviors and their adoption of technology,” says managing director Toby Dayton.

LinkUp has found that users spend between 10 and 11 minutes, on average, its smart phone applications, “said Dayton. They are seeking employment who are not likely to be at home, near a computer. Instead, the mobile application allows people to seek employment anywhere, anytime, “When people see a company or brand and something triggers an idea in their head,” said Dayton.

They could be at a party where they met someone who works for a company interested in. They can do a job search immediately, then save the search for later. “Ideally, the application enables people to improve their research and think more thoroughly about the type of jobs and careers they want, the type of companies they want to work for the types of roles and responsibilities that will bring satisfaction in their lives, “says Dayton.

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