Tag: laptops

10 things we can’t live without

10 things we can't live without

The harrowing recession began in 2007 overturned the American priorities, with frugality now considered a virtue for the first time in decades. Despite recent uptick in spending, retail sales remain lower than they were three years ago. Sales of homes, cars and appliances have plunged. Shoppers have cut the toilet paper and cigarettes, once thought recession proof. Although sales are down porn. Thrift, it seems, has no borders.

However, the Americans clung to a few expensive necessities surprising, reflecting changes in American society that go far beyond pennies. Food, clothing and housing have long been staples most obvious. But the data he has finally roll into the wind as the recession shows that we also need a little entertainment and a tasty beverage or two. The company is more important than ever – even if it is not the man. And you can not even find a job these days if you do not have Internet access. As we redefine what is really important, here are 10 new key U.S.

1. Laptops (Portable computers)

IPAD could be the latest must-have gadget, but the computer power transcends trendiness. Brianna Karp, for example, has discovered a lot of homeless people in line, saving many through their own laptop, as she. Shipments of phones have skyrocketed over the last three years, with sales in 2010 may be twice what they were in 2007, according to the Consumer Electronics Association. Part of the jump comes from netbooks but cheap laptops of all sizes are more pervasive than we socialize, communicate, shop, get our new and increasingly live our lives online. sales office, meanwhile, have been on a steady decline, stability, mobility assets.

2. High-speed internet

Many people have reduced cable television, telephone service, and even gas and electricity use. But once you have access to high speed Internet, you do not go back. In a poll by the Pew Research Center last year, high speed Internet was one of three things that people said was a necessity in 2009 than in 2006. Appliances such as microwaves, dryer and dishwasher, however, are considered less important in 2009 than they had. And the data of the Telecommunications Industry Association shows that the rapid increase in the number of broadband Internet subscribers hardly slowed in 2008 or 2009. In 2013, more than 90 percent of all Internet connections in the United States will be high speed.

Global sales of mobile phones fell for the first time in 2009. But sales of smart phones – which can handle email, browse the Internet and do a variety of other things – increased 7 percent, according to TIA. And sales could jump 25 percent this year, as people who have been putting off upgrades mobile finally NAB iPhone or Blackberry of their dreams. As laptops, smart phones have become a lifeline for multitasking harassed we pretend that we are not.

4. Education

As Kevin and Deanna Daum were spiral into bankruptcy in 2009, they decided they could live without their two cars, their two homes, and most of the subtleties. But they insisted on keeping tuition of their son, then an elderly person in a private secondary school. Many Americans seem to feel the same.

Although the data does not readily show how much families spend on education, many families say they have given up other things to protect their children’s education, whether in school or a private school, tutoring, enrichment programs or activities related to school. private school enrollment has decreased by less than one percent of 2008-2010, and university enrollments have increased over the past two years. This is partly because jobs are scarce, but also because Americans value education at all. “It’s an investment that pays very well,” said Sandy Baum, an economist at the College Board. “People are willing to borrow for it and they know it is shortsighted to abandon.”

5. Television

Amercian spend less on entertainment – but watching more television. A recent study by Deloitte has found that typical American watches worth nearly 18 hours of shows on TV at home every week, two hours longer than last year. One reason could be that people are more unemployed kill time at home. But television can also be seen as a cheap alternative to sports events, concerts and buying DVDs. And hard core viewers can not be all that short, since sales of HDTVs have increased steadily throughout the recession.

6. Movies

Ticket sales dipped in 2008 but rebounded in 2009, reaching a peak in five years. One major reason was Avatar and other films in 3-D, which accounted for 11 per cent of the fund to take in 2009, up 2 percent the previous year. Any increase in box office is a victory for the cinema, which until last year had been losing viewers for home theater systems and a growing range of films on cable and the Internet. 

7. Music downloads

The need for mobility applies to music, too. CD sales fell 21 percent in 2009, but downloading entire albums and singles grew almost as much. The Pew study comparing luxury and needs helps explain why, more people considered an iPod a necessity in 2009 than in 2006 despite the recession.

8. Pets

Fido is sitting at the table these days. Maybe even the head of the table. While Americans have cut back spending on themselves, spending on pet food, supplies, grooming, veterinary care and clothing (clothing?) Has been the continuing rise of around 5 percent year. Industry representatives attribute this to the “humanization” of pets, which has led many pet owners to close the “quality of life gap” between their animals and themselves. The iWoof can not be far behind.

9. Booze

Smoking does not make us less than fully virtuous. The Americans fell alcohol upscale, but we are drinking enough to compensate for cheap stuff, which is the usual trend during recessions. Beer and wine have increased slightly during the same in recent years. With a bar and restaurant sales down, which suggests more people are drinking at home – while they watch television, no doubt.

10. Coffee

The Americans have followed the advice of pennies, and then returned to the stud of $ 5 per day. But they make up most infused their own coffee. About 56 percent of American adults drink coffee, a proportion that has not changed in recent years. But a recent survey by the National Coffee Association found that 86 percent of coffee drinkers have their own home, up from 82 percent a year earlier. And those who drink coffee at another place (think Starbucks) fell from 31 percent in 2009 to 26 percent in 2010. Of course, if people are drinking more alcohol at home, then it is logical that they themselves be more doses of coffee, too. If the economy improves, perhaps we need less of each.

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What you need to know about 4G phones

What you need to know about 4G phones

Even heavy data users should think carefully before rushing out to get an ultrafast 4G phone.

Imagine having a mobile phone that matches what you can do on your home PC or laptop. That’s the power of 4G – the term for fourth generation mobile service – which was rolled out by Sprint (S) earlier this year and will soon be available for Verizon (VZ) subscribers. Here are the most important things you need to know about 4G.

1. It’s fast. Sprint, the first mover in the 4G market, says its 4G is up to 10 times faster than 3G, which was introduced eight years ago. Sprint promises peak downloads of more than 10 Mbps (megabits per second), with average downloads of three to six Mbps. Verizon announced on October 6 that it plans in the fourth quarter to launch its 4G LTE (Long Term Evolution) network with downloads to range between 5 to 12 Mbps.

A closer look at the numbers, however, reveals that 4G speeds may vary. Sprint says that 4G can be 10 times faster than 3G. But read the fine print in Sprint’s promotional material: Sprint bases this claim on speed comparison between 3G’s low-end 600 kilobits per second (Kbps) vs. 4G’s max 6Mbps. Sprint notes that 3G can reach 1.7 Mbps, while 4G may drop down to 3 Mbps. So that’s less than twice as fast. We will know more specifics about Verizon’s network in the weeks ahead as it rolls out its service.

2. Regardless of how much faster 4G might be, the increased connection speed lets you do more things with your phone. Early users are already enjoying features like uninterrupted video conferencing, high-definition television streaming and of course lightning fast web surfing that smartphones on 3G networks are unable to provide. Power business users and other early adopters of the new technology who experience 4G will never want to go back.

3. Casual users mostly interested in talking, texting and occasional web surfing on their cell phones don’t need to rush into buying a 4G-enabled phone (and it is not possible to upgrade existing 3G models to the new network.) Even if you are ready to buy a phone and wanted to upgrade to 4G, the network is not available in all parts of the country (see below). It will take years for 4G to roll out into every rural area, and residents of big cities could get shut out due to big restrictions on new cell phone towers.

4. You can easily find out if 4G is available in your area. Sprint says its 4G network reaches more than 268 million people in 50 markets in the United States “and counting.” To see whether 4G is available in your hometown, go here.

Verizon says its 4G LTE network initially will cover 100 million people in 38 markets by the end of 2010. The first markets with access to Verizon’s 4G network include Boston, New York, Washington D.C., Chicago, Miami, Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco.

5. 4G is more expensive. Sprint currently charges its customers with 4G-enabled devices an extra $10 per month, regardless of whether they can access a 4G network or not. With increased data usage and Verizon entering the fray, both networks are rumored to convert to “pay-as-you-go” pricing schemes rather than unlimited use packages. 4G devices will also invariably cost more – at least at first – than similar phones on the same networks.

Back in May, Sprint launched its first 4G phone, HTC EVO 4G, selling for $200 with a two-year contract. That phone runs on Google’s Android mobile operating system, and has access to nearly 100,000 Android apps. Verizon has not announced pricing and plan information for upcoming 4G-enabled smartphones.

6. Batteries take a hit on 4G. Sprint’s HTC EVO 4G can run out of battery power after only a few hours of use. While power can be conserved by switching off the 4G setting, the last thing you want to do with your new state-of-the-art smartphone is to slow it down. Extra battery packets which add to the weight of an already heavy phone can be purchased for about $100.

7. A 4G mobile hotspot can give a boost to your 3G phone. Sprint’s website displays a video showing how an iPhone user can find its 4G network and increase the iPhone’s speed. Take that AT&T. Sprint says the hotspot can work with up to five Wi-Fi-enabled devices at time: a phone, a laptop, camera, a couple music players and so on. Sprint says the Overdrive 3G/4G Mobile Hotspot by Sierra Wireless is the first dual-mode mobile hotspot on the market.

8. Sprint and Verizon are leading the way with 4G, but where’s the competition? They’re not snoozing. Kent German reported in CNET that AT&T will be busting a move into 4G next year. AT&T Operations CEO John Stankey says the company will light up its network with LTE service by the middle of 2011. He didn’t list cities, but he says AT&T is aiming to cover between 70 million and 75 million people by the end of 2011.

Meanwhile T-Mobile has been touting its HPSA+ upgrade. T-Mobile says the upgrade increases its network’s speed three to five times over 3G. T-Mobile describes its HSPA+ enhancement as a “super-fast mobile broadband network that delivers 4G speeds in the Northeastern U.S. and other major cities across the country.”

9. So if you are one of those people with a need for speed or rely on your phone for multimedia business communication, it makes sense to upgrade to a 4G phone right away. Just understand the geographic restrictions in accessing the network, and be prepared to pay more in your monthly bill while also making sure to charge your phone more regularly.

For everyone else, there is no need to rush into 4G. Whenever it is naturally time to upgrade your phone due to performance or an expiring contract, you should consider jumping on to the faster network. By that time, 4G will be available in more areas and on more carriers. Although I wouldn’t expect prices to go down, battery and other technical issues associated with new gadgets should be resolved.

The only other thing you’ll have to worry about at that point is when it makes sense to upgrade to the fifth generation of cell phone technology.

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