Tag: Finding A Job

Are you shy? Discover best careers fit for you

Are you shy? Discover best careers fit for you

Feel like your quiet personality makes you the office outsider? Here are six careers where a reserved nature is an asset, not a limitation.

Does the phrase “small talk” make you cringe? If you’re a quiet person, navigating the social niceties of the professional world could be a real drag. You may even feel like your personality is holding you back from getting a leg up in your current career. But don’t count yourself out just yet. A quiet demeanor could conceal great powers of observation or analysis.

“People who are quiet might focus on data and things, rather than people, so there are some occupations [in which] they might be able to do a better job,” says Laurence Shatkin, a career expert and author of several books, including “50 Best Jobs for Your Personality.”

Ready to let your quiet attributes do the talking? Consider pursuing these careers where your natural inclinations could be your greatest assets.

Career 1: Accountant

When data talks, are you usually listening? An ability to sit quietly while poring over numbers could serve you well as an accountant.

If you prefer to keep quiet and focus on the details, this number-driven occupation could play to your strengths, Shatkin says. Reviewing financial statements, computing taxes, and reviewing accounting systems are some of the duties required of accountants, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Accountants carry out their duties in either an office or at home, according to the Department of Labor. Sounds like you’ll have plenty of quality time to spend with your number-friends. Just keep in mind that this job may require meeting face-to-face with clients on occasion, in order to provide recommendations or explain your findings, the Department notes.

Career 2: Graphic Designer

Would you rather express yourself through images than words? Your skills as a visual communicator could take center stage in a graphic design career. Quiet people are often considered better listeners, Shatkin says, which means they may have an advantage in this creative field.

Why do graphic designers need active listening skills? In order to “really focus on what the client is trying to convey with the graphic,” Shatkin says.

But taking direction from clients isn’t the only time you’ll find yourself keeping mum. As a graphic designer, you might spend much of your time figuring out the best way to use colors, images, text, and layouts to communicate ideas, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Sounding a little lonely? Don’t worry, graphic designers aren’t completely solitary. Being able to work in teams is also an important quality, as graphic designers often collaborate directly with a client or in conjunction with marketers, programmers, or other graphic designers, the Department of Labor notes.

Career 3: Software Developer

If you come up with your best ideas during quiet contemplation, a career as a software developer could deliver rewarding work. “Software developers are the creative minds behind computer programs,” according to the U.S. Department of Labor. While they may work in teams, most of the day-to-day work is solo, Shatkin says.

Daily tasks might include designing computer applications such as word processors or games, or creating the operating systems used in consumer electronics, the Department of Labor reports. Still, software developers don’t work in a vacuum. They will need to address feedback from customers about programs they develop, says the Department.

Career 4: Database Administrator

Do you like to quietly and thoroughly think over the task at hand before taking action? If so, you may want to think over a career as a database administrator. Talk about the need for quiet concentration: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, in this career “a minor error can cause major problems.”

That’s because database administrators are responsible for organizing large amounts of data for important processes, like credit card transactions, the Department of Labor reports. Of course, where there are important databases, there are also users of those databases, which is why this career can also require “a fair amount of collaborative work,” Shatkin notes.

Career #5: Writer

Do you feel most comfortable when you’re up to your eyeballs in research and facts – with not a person in sight? Then you might have a calling as a writer. Quiet people often have a great ability to concentrate on slogging through information, Shatkin says. This kind of endurance can be a prized skill for writers, who, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, need to demonstrate strong research and proper citation methods to establish credibility in their work.

Writers produce work for many different mediums. In addition to writing for books and magazines, writers might create content for an advertisement, website, or TV or film script, according to the Department of Labor.

Yes, writing is often a solitary endeavor, but a supporting cast is needed to see manuscripts through to publication. As a writer, you would likely communicate regularly with an editor or client, the Department notes.

Career 6: Survey Researcher

Surveys are used regularly to help organizations test the waters of public opinion, but did you ever wonder who designs the questions? Survey researchers – that’s who. If you’re one for long hours of quiet contemplation, this could be the career for you.

The listening skills that seem to go hand-in-hand with quiet personalities can be the key to designing surveys that deliver reliable, meaningful results, Shatkin says.

No, surveys won’t tell you how they should be designed, but your employers might. “Part of [survey research] is finding out what someone needs to learn from the survey, and that requires really listening,” Shatkin says.

As a survey researcher, you could enjoy a good amount of silent work – like researching the survey topic, determining the best method for accurately capturing the desired information, or using statistical software to analyze the results, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Just note that you won’t be spending all of your time on Silent Street. Survey researchers can also be responsible for conducting surveys themselves by facilitating focus groups or interviewing people over the phone or in-person, according to the Department of Labor.

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Landing a job in the publishing industry

Landing a job in the publishing industry

There is no secret how to find a job in the publishing industry like an editor, copywriter or a writer. The truth is landing a job in the publishing industry is like finding a job in any other industry. Preparation and assertiveness are always key ingredients to succeed. There is never a quick fix to a job search so you have spend time, effort and money before you can actually get the job of your dreams.

In order to help you to succeed in landing your publishing industry job, here are some steps that can help you along the way:

Become qualified for the position you desire;
Learn to demonstrate your qualifications;
Research prospective employers;

Call up employers;
Master the interview process;
Follow up after the interview and when things do not work out;
Start over from step 1.

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Gap Year Experience: Why more teens are delaying college

Gap Year Experience: Why more teens are delaying college

Taking a year off is catching on with students looking for adventure and to avoid burnout.

This summer, Monika Lutz’s life took an unusual turn. Instead of heading off to college, the high school graduate packed her bags for a Bengali jungle. Lutz, like a growing number of other young Americans, is taking a year off. Gap years are quite common in Britain and Australia, but they are just beginning to catch on in the U.S. Lutz, who grew up in Boulder, Colo., has put together a 14-month schedule that includes helping deliver solar power to impoverished communities in India and interning for a fashion designer in Shanghai – experiences that are worlds away from the stuffy lecture halls and beer-stained frat houses that await many of her peers. “I could not be happier,” she says.

No one tracks the number of U.S. students who decide to take gap years, but many high school guidance counselors and college admissions officers say the option is becoming more popular. Harvard, which has long encouraged its incoming first-years to defer matriculation, has seen a 33% jump in the past decade in the number of students taking gap years. MIT’s deferments have doubled in the past year. And Princeton formalized the trend in 2009 by funding gap-year adventures for 20 incoming first-years annually. The school’s goal is to extend this offer to about 100 students per class.

Meanwhile, a cottage industry of gap-year programs and consultants has sprouted in the U.S. Tom Griffiths, founder of GapYear.com a site that serves as a clearinghouse for gap-year programs, says that five years ago, perhaps 1% of his Web traffic originated in the U.S. Now, that figure is 10%. The number of Americans taking gap years through Projects Abroad, a U.K. company that coordinates volunteer programs around the world, has nearly quadrupled since 2005. The organization just launched Global Gap, its first effort marketed specifically to Americans; the 27-week curriculum features service projects in South Africa, Peru, India and Thailand.

Like a year of college, these adventures can be expensive. The price tag for Global Gap is $30,000. Thinking Beyond Borders, a highly respected, eight-month program that parachutes students into third-world communities, costs $39,000. Yes, it’s certainly possible for students to pursue meaningful volunteer work on a smaller budget. But unless kids stay at home and get a paying job nearby, families will likely incur significant expense. The increase in interest suggests that at least some families are willing. “There are now more structured opportunities for students to take gap years,” says David Hawkins, the director of public policy and research for the National Association for College Admission Counseling. “That doesn’t happen unless there’s a market to sustain it.”

Why are students attracted to the gap-year concept? According to new survey data from Karl Haigler and Rae Nelson, education-policy experts and co-authors of The Gap-Year Advantage, the most common reason cited for deferring college is to avoid burnout. “I felt like I was focused on college as a means to an end,” says Kelsi Morgan, an incoming Middlebury College freshman who spent last year feeding llamas at a North Dakota monastery, interning for a judge in Tulsa, Okla., and teaching English at an orphanage in the Dominican Republic. The hope is that after a year out of the classroom, students will enter college more energized, focused and mature. That can be an advantage for colleges too. Robert Clagett, dean of admissions at Middlebury, did some number-crunching a few years ago and found that a single gap semester was the strongest predictor of academic success at his school.

Most experts recommend securing a spot in college before taking a gap year and warn against using the time off to pad your rÉsumÉ. “Most admissions folks can see right through that,” says Jim Jump, the academic dean of St. Christopher’s School in Richmond, Va. But for students like Lutz, who, after getting rejected from five Ivies, decided to take time off, a gap year can help reprioritize and focus interests. Lutz now plans to apply mostly to non-Ivies that have strong marketing programs. “This experience has really opened my eyes to the opportunities the world has to offer,” she says.

But at least one education expert doesn’t want schools spreading the gap-year message as if it were gospel. In a study that followed 11,000 members of the high school class of 1992 for eight years after graduation, Stefanie DeLuca, a sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University, found that, all things being equal, those who delayed college by a year were 64% less likely to complete a bachelor’s degree than those who enrolled immediately after high school. DeLuca did not pinpoint whether these students voluntarily started college late, but at the very least, her work indicates that taking a gap year doesn’t guarantee success. “I’m not going to say that time off does not have benefits,” says DeLuca. “But I think we should be tempered in our enthusiasm.”

No one’s gap-year enthusiasm was more tempered than Olivia Ragni’s. In the spring of 2009, the high schooler from Arkadelphia, Ark., inadvertently missed the deadline to secure her spot at Rice University that fall and was told she would have to wait a year to enroll. “I was really down,” says Ragni, who still cries when recalling the embarrassment of informing her classmates of the unintended deferment. But through two experiential-learning organizations, she spent the year volunteering in a hospital in India, taking intensive Spanish while hiking volcanoes in Guatemala and working at an elephant camp in Thailand. “I gained confidence and independence,” says Ragni, who has just arrived in Houston to start her first term at Rice. “It was the best experience of my life.” The tears have dried up. Consider it a lucky break.

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Tough job-interview questions answered

Tough job-interview questions answered

When telling a prospective employer about yourself, avoid the chronological approach and try this.

For many people, job interviews are the most stressful part of the job-search process. And it’s true that an interview is often a make-or-break moment: If you flub the interview in a big way, you probably won’t make the cut–no matter how good your resum is, or how excellent your qualifications are.

You can combat nerves and increase your chances of success by practicing your answers to difficult interview questions. Here are some of the toughest, with suggested answers:

1. Why do you want to work in this industry?

Bad answer:
“I love to shop. Even as a kid, I spent hours flipping through catalogs.”

Tip:
Don’t just say you like it. Anyone can do that. Focus instead on your history with that particular industry, and if you can, tell a success story.

Good answer:
“I’ve always loved shopping, but my interest in retail marketing really started when I worked at a neighborhood boutique. I knew that our clothes were amazing, but that we weren’t marketing them properly. So I worked with management to come up with a marketing strategy that increased our sales by 25 percent in a year. It was great to be able to contribute positively to an industry I feel so passionate about, and to help promote a product I really believed in.”

2. Tell us about yourself.

Bad answer:
“I graduated four years ago from the University of Michigan, with a bachelor’s in biology–but I decided that wasn’t the right path for me. So I switched gears and got my first job, working in sales for a startup. Then I went on to work in marketing for a law firm. After that, I took a few months off to travel. Finally, I came back and worked in marketing again. And now, here I am, looking for a more challenging marketing role.”

Tip:
Instead of giving a chronological work history, focus on your strengths and how they pertain to the role. If possible, illustrate with examples.

Good answer:
“I’m really energetic, and I’m a great communicator. Working in sales for two years helped me build confidence and taught me the importance of customer loyalty. I’ve also got a track record of success. In my last role, I launched a company newsletter, which helped us build on our existing relationships and create new ones. Because of this, we ended up seeing a revenue increase of 10 percent over two years. I’m also very interested in how companies can use web tools to better market themselves, and would be committed to building on your existing platform.”

3. What do you think of your previous boss?

Bad answer:
“He was completely incompetent, and a nightmare to work with, which is why I’ve moved on.”

Tip:
Remember that if you get the job, many of the people interviewing you will someday be your previous bosses. The last thing they want is to hire someone they know will badmouth them. Instead of trashing your former employer, stay positive, and focus on what you learned from him (no matter how awful he really was).

Good answer:
“My last boss taught me the importance of time management, didn’t pull any punches, and was extremely deadline-driven. His no-nonsense attitude pushed me to work harder, and to meet deadlines I never even thought were possible.”
Read more

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Careers with strong growth potential

Careers with strong growth potential

Whether you’re just starting out or switching professions, check out these promising fields.

Looking to rebound from the recession in a new, growing career? Whether you’re on the brink of embarking on your first career, switching careers, or looking for work after a slump, the good news is that there are some careers that aren’t going anywhere. Check out these careers with strong growth factors – then see if any are right for you.

Career 1 – Accountant

If you’re comfortable working with numbers, there’s lots of opportunity out there for helping individuals and companies manage their money as an accountant. To qualify for this role, you’ll need at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related area, says the U.S. Department of Labor.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that between 2008 and 2018, accounting will be one of the fastest-growing occupations in the country with 22 percent growth. The profession is projected to add 279,000 jobs in the ten year time frame.

What Accountants Do: Accountants balance books, prepare tax returns, keep management informed on the company’s financial health, and help the company exercise sound judgment when buying assets of any kind.

Career 2 – Registered Nurse (RN)

Want to pursue opportunities in a growing – and rewarding – industry? Look into earning either an associate’s or bachelor’s in nursing or a nursing diploma.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of Labor says nursing will grow 22 percent from 2008 and 2018. Translated to the number of jobs, that’s 581,500 new RN positions.

What RNs Do: RNs provide patient care and education to those with medical conditions. They might administer medication, perform diagnostic tests, and run blood drives.

Career 3 – Computer Systems Analyst

If you’re looking for a growing career that requires big-picture thinking, computer systems analyst might be the right option for you. Consider earning a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of labor projects 20 percent job growth (108,100 computer systems analyst positions) from 2008-2018.

What Computer Systems Analysts Do: Computer systems analysts help implement and improve existing computer systems, reviewing capabilities, analyzing requirements, and making recommendations for software.

Career 4 – Dental Assistant

If you’re looking for careers with a strong rebound factor, dental assisting takes the cake. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this is one of the fastest growing professions from 2008-2018. The best part: You could potentially qualify to pursue opportunities in this field with a one-year dental assisting program.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of Labor expects 36 percent growth (105,600 new jobs) in this field between 2008 and 2018.

What Dental Assistants Do: Dental assistants perform a variety of functions in a dentist’s office, including preparing patients for procedures and updating dental records.

Career 5 – Computer Support Specialist

If there’s one industry that shows no signs of slowing down, it’s computer technology. Prepare for opportunities in one section of this growing field with an associate’s degree in information technology or computer science.

Growth Factor: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this profession is projected to experience 14 percent growth from 2008-2018. That’s 78,000 new jobs.

What Computer Support Specialists Do: Technical support specialists provide support and advice to computer users, writing training manuals, responding to questions, and resolving technical issues.

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Beware of your social media history

Beware of your social media history

One firm collects everything you may have said or done online in the past seven years.

Companies have long used the criminal background checks, credit reports and even research on Google and LinkedIn to probe the past lives of potential employees. Now, some companies are requiring job applicants also pass a background check of social media.

A start-up years, social intelligence, scrapes the internet for all potential employees may have said or done online in the last seven years.

He then assembles a dossier with examples of professional awards and charitable work, as well as negative information that meets specific criteria: proof online racist remarks, references to drugs, sexually explicit images, messages text or videos, flagrant displays of weapons or bombs and clearly identifiable violent activity.

“We are not detectives,” said Max Drucker, CEO of the company, based in Santa Barbara, Calif. “All that we climb is what is publicly available on the Internet today.”

The Federal Trade Commission, after initially raising concerns last fall about Social Business Intelligence, the company is determined in accordance with the Act, the Fair Credit Reporting, but the service still alarms privacy advocates who say that invites employers to view information that may not be relevant to job performance.

And what a flattering relevant information has led to job offers being withdrawn or not? Mr. Drucker said that a prospective employee was found using Craigslist to look for OxyContin. A woman posing nude in the pictures she has set up a site for sharing the picture did not get the job she was looking for in a hospital.

Other background reports have been found examples of people who are anti-Semitic comments and racist remarks, he said. Then there was the job seeker who belonged to a Facebook group, “is America. I would not have to press 1 for English.” This raises a question. “Does that mean you do not like people who do not speak English?” Asked Dr. Drucker rhetoric.

Mr. Drucker said that his goal was to conduct pre-employment to help companies meet their obligation to conduct fair hiring practices and consistent while protecting the privacy of job applicants.

For example, he said reports remove references to religion of any person, race, marital status, sexual orientation, disability and other information protected by federal employment, where companies are not supposed to ask about during interviews. In addition, applicants must first consent to background checks, and they are informed of any adverse information found.

It supports research to reduce the risk that employers may confuse the candidate working with someone else or displayed on the Information Society that is not legally admissible or relevant. “Googling someone is ridiculously unfair,” he said. “An employer may discriminate against someone inadvertently. Or worse, they face all kinds of allegations of discrimination.”

Marc S. Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, based in Washington, said that employers have the right to gather information to make a decision on the expertise of job-related, but concerned that “employers should not judge what people do in their private life away from the workplace.”

Less than a third of the surface data firm Mr. Drucker just like the major social platforms like Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. He said most of the negative information about job candidates comes from web searches found deep to comment on blogs and messages on small social sites like Tumblr, the blogging site, as well as Yahoo user groups, e-commerce sites, message boards and even Craigslist.

Then there are the photos and videos that people post – or are tagged in – on Facebook and YouTube and other sharing sites like Flickr, Picasa, Photobucket and Yfrog.

And there are pictures and videos that seem to get most people in need. “Sexually explicit pictures and videos are beyond understanding,” Mr. Drucker said. “We see such blatant displays of weapons. And we see a lot of illegal activities. Many, many pictures of drug use. ”

He recalled a man who had 15 pages of photos to show with different guns, including an assault rifle. Another man included pictures of himself standing in a greenhouse with a large marijuana plants.

Given the complex “conditions of service” agreements on most sites and Web applications, said Rotenberg people do not realize that comments or content that they generate are publicly available.

“People are led to believe that there is more limited communication that there is indeed, in many cases,” he said, noting that frequent changes to Facebook’s privacy settings in recent years may put people at risk to find a job today because of the personal information they may have inadvertently made public.

“What Facebook did was to take personal information from people they have available to family and friends and make this information more widely available to potential employers,” said Mr. Rotenberg, whose organization has several complaints pending at the Federal Trade Commission on the privacy settings of Facebook.

Joe Bontke, outreach manager for the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Houston, said he regularly reminds employers and human resource managers about the risks of violation of federal rules and laws against discrimination in employment using the online search in hiring decisions.

“The things you can not ask in an interview are the same things that you can not research,” he said, which includes the full range of information on the age of a person, sex, religion, disability, national origin and race.

However, he added that 75 percent of recruiters are required by their companies to research candidates online. And 70 percent of recruiters in the report that the United States they have rejected candidates because of information online, he said.

Dave Clark, owner of Advanced Impulse Communications, a telecommunications company in Southern California, began to rely on social intelligence for screening background, because it said the company needed a formal strategy and standards before assembling information online about candidates. “They provided us a standardized arm’s length how to use this additional information to make better hiring decisions,” he said.

About half of all businesses, based on government and private investigations, are now using credit reports as part of the hiring process, except in states that limit or restrict their use. As with background checks of social media, there are concerns about information that appeared. The equal employment agency filed a lawsuit last December against the Company Kaplan Higher Education, accusing it of discrimination against black job seekers in the way we use credit history in its hiring process.

But it is not unusual for senior high-level executives in many companies to submit to background checks even more complete by a private firm to survey.

“We live in a world where you have an incredible amount of information and data on all officers,” said Ann Blinkhorn, an executive recruiter in the converging technologies, media and communications industry. “I think it puts the burden on the recruiter and the hiring manager to be truly reflected on what is important and not important in the hiring decision.”

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Plan a career switch this summer

Plan a career switch this summer

Use some free time to take online classes and work toward a new degree.

Thinking of switching careers or adding some skills to your resume? Looking for the right time to go back to school and get your degree? Summertime may be the right time to get started.

Summer classes are quickly becoming a popular option for college students of all kinds, according to Kyle Brown, director of online learning at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Canton.

Summer enrollment at SUNY Canton, for example, has jumped nearly 300 percent over the past four years, says Brown. Much of that growth is due to the fact that 90 percent of its summer classes are available online.

Want to use the summer to get a head start on your education? We’ve spotlighted some of the fastest growing careers through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, and separated them into three different career categories. Using this data, we also included the most common degree or preparation needed in each career. Keep reading to see why summertime may be the right time to start these programs…

Head Start Option 1: Health Care Programs

Looking for a red hot degree program to start this summer? Consider pursuing a degree in health care. With health care reform in full swing, it’s an exciting time to dive into this rewarding profession.

Associate’s in Medical Assisting
Medical Assistant – $29,450

Dental Assisting Certificate
Dental Assistant – $34,000

Associate’s in Nursing
Registered Nurse – $66,530

Did You Know? Ten of the 20 fastest growing jobs in the country through 2018 are in health care, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, and nursing and medical assisting careers are on the list!

Head Start Option 2: Business Programs

Looking to give your career a boost? Start the process this summer and consider studying business. As a whole, the industry is showing positive signs of heating up. In March 2011, small businesses in the U.S. added 50,000 new jobs, according to the Intuit Small Business Employment Index.

Bachelor’s in Accounting
Accountant – $67,430

Bachelor’s in Business
Personal Financial Advisor – $94,180

Master of Business Administration
Marketing Manager – $120,070

Did You Know? Personal financial advisors are enjoying a 30 percent increase in employment opportunities through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Head Start Option 3: Technology Programs

Summer is a perfect time to start gaining the skills one would need to start a career in technology, which is an industry always in search of the next hot thing. What it will be isn’t clear, but it’s safe to say that professionals with a background in technology will be behind it, just like they were for Twitter, iPads, and the like.

Bachelor’s in Information Systems
Computer Support Specialist – $47,360

Bachelor’s in Network Administration
Network Systems Administrator – $70,930

Bachelor’s in Computer Science
Computer Programmer – $74,690

Did You Know? Network systems analysts are enjoying a whopping 53 percent increase in employment opportunities through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

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Job fields with surprisingly high earnings

Job fields with surprisingly high earnings

You’ll never guess the average incomes in these seven diverse professions.

Career 1 – Public Relations Specialist

Think public relations gigs can’t pay? Think again. Reputation can have a direct impact on profitability, making many companies willing to pay well for PR specialists. In fact, the mean annual wage for this career is $59,370, with the top ten percent earning – on average – $96,630.

Potential career prep: A bachelor’s degree in a subject like communications – plus public relations experience – can provide adequate preparation for careers in this field, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Career 2 – Fashion Designer

Becoming a fashion designer is a good gig. It also has the potential to pay surprisingly well. Fashion designers make about $74,000 annually. Most fashion designer positions are in New York or California, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Potential career prep: Studying fashion design is the first step. You can earn an associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree, which is what employers usually look for, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Career 3 – Art Director

Working as an art director has the potential to pay. Whether you find a position as an art director at a magazine, website, book publisher, or agency, it’s a career that can lead to big bucks. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the average pay for art directors in May 2009 was $91,520.

Potential career prep: To become an art director, you need an extensive, eye-popping portfolio of work, as well as enough experience to prove you’re worthy of the position. Consider studying art and graphic design in school to get started.

Career 4 – Paralegal

Think becoming a lawyer is the only way to make money in the legal field? Think again. Paralegals, who do everything from interviewing potential witnesses to conducting research and assisting lawyers in general office work, have the potential to earn a pretty decent living too. The mean annual wage for paralegals in May 2009 was $50,080, with the top ten percent averaging at $75,700.

Potential career prep: An associate’s or bachelor’s degree in paralegal studies can provide you with career-relevant skills. If you already have a degree, another option is to earn a certificate from a paralegal program.

Career 5 – High School Art, Drama, or Music Teacher

It’s probably not the first teaching title that springs to mind, but the average compensation is surprisingly competitive for high school art, drama, and music teachers, who get to pass along their passion for creativity to a younger generation. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the average annual pay is $68,230.

Potential career prep: A bachelor’s degree is a must for this type of position, as is completion of a teaching education program. To become a public school teacher, you’ll need to get licensed to teach in your home state.

Career 6 – Advertising Sales Agent

It’s not just creative types who can make money in advertising. Companies rely upon advertising sales agents, who make about $53,000 on average, to bring in the revenue they need to turn a profit. The top ten percent of advertising sales agents averaged at $94,100 in May 2009.

Potential career prep: You’ll need a bachelor’s degree to work in sales for most employers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Studying communications, marketing, or business is recommended.

Career 7 – Police Officer

For police officers, working on behalf of the public has the potential to pay surprisingly well. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this gig pays about $55,000 on average, and $83,550 for the top ten percent of earners. While no part of a community’s budget is sacred these days, law and order remains a priority across the country.

Potential career prep: A high school diploma and some work experience are musts. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, federal agencies expect a college degree.

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Does your resumé make you look old?

Does your resumé make you look old?

You might be wise not to broadcast when you got your university degree.

Been applying for work and have little to show for it? Don’t assume the lousy job market is solely to blame. Your résumé could be working against you as well. Best practices for resume writing have changed in recent years, said Wendy Enelow, a management trainer and author of “Expert Résumés for Baby Boomers.” If you have not held, your document can be a sign that you passed your choice.

1. Exaggerate contacts

Multiple phone numbers to summarize the look, you’re a dinosaur, if you specify a fax!

The solution: Instead, simply enter your mobile number and e-mail – without labeling them as such, “said executive coach Donald Asher, author of” The Night Summary.”

2. Relying on clichés

Some language has become so common in resumes that he is now virtually meaningless.

The solution: Skip these words and phrases that LinkedIn to be the most overused in resumes online: innovative, motivated, broad experience, results-oriented, dynamic, proven team player, fast, problem solving, and entrepreneurship. Instead, use keywords from the job, which will help you go beyond the resume-scanning programs, many businesses use today.

3. Do not describe former employers

A young manager of recruitment may not have the same scope of industry knowledge that you are doing, and will not be able to put your experience in context.

The solution: “Unless it’s a Fortune 500 company, add a line like” private company that manufactures pencils in the world, “says Patricia Lenkov, CEO of Agility Executive Search in New York.

4. Using the format obsolete

For your first resume, you may have learned to put dates on the left, but this is not the way he did more.

The fix: List of years – not months, which are only relevant for recent graduates – on the right after your title and company,” said Asher.

5. The sub-self-employment

Job seekers are often too vague on the timing of self-employment, which makes them look like periods of unemployment, “said Lenkov.

The fix: Be specific about the projects you discussed and the names of some of your customers, if you have permission.

6. Lead with a goal

“It’s all about what you want from the company,” says Enelow executive coach. “What is the management company? Are you the scoop in this market.”

The solution: Start with a profile or career summary focusing on what you can contribute. This person might say 15-plus years of experience “the spearhead of the global campaigns of business development. (Why not 28?” Fifteen-plus communicates well qualified, but not on the hill, “says Enelow. ) You can also leave a bulleted list of expertise, such as “developing new clients” or “make financial projections.”

7. Reveal When you got your degrees

Scary as it is, the hiring manager may not yet born.

The solution: Take off grad dates. “Are we fooling anyone by doing it? No, Enelow says, “but at least we’re not slapping them in the face.”

8. Delving too deeply into the past

Your first work experiences are probably far from the level and type of work you do today.

The solution: In general, return just 15 years unless you have significant achievements before, Enelow said.

9. Showcasing Run-of-the-Mill Skills

Declare your familiarity with MS Word, PowerPoint, Excel, or gives the impression that if you just come on board.

The fix: List as specialized software (such as Quick-Books) or new technologies (platform programming Ruby on Rails, for example), said Garrett Miller, a former hiring manager for Pfizer, which now holds CoTria, a consulting firm in workplace productivity.

10. Noting the passive activities

While recreation can create common ground, “said Miller, you do not want to highlight those that make you seem sedentary or without energy.

The fix: Sports such as cycling or running to demonstrate the vibrancy, as well as the activities in which you give – organize a fund-raising, for example. Experts recommended time noting the religious activities such as singing in a church choir, but that has changed and these activities telegraph integrity, a quality that is very important to hiring managers today said Miller.

11. Give little attention to the recent experience

Many older job seekers are hamstrung by outdated rules requiring resume to fit on one page, and so they have their recent crisis – and relevant – the experience until he says nothing.

The solution: Expand your resume to two or three pages is perfectly acceptable for someone in their forties or fifties. Devote half a page to your most recent job, Lenkov said. Ball and action-oriented highlights, making sure to include quantifiable accomplishments such as “Reduced costs by 16% over two years.”

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Smart careers for intelligent people

Smart careers for intelligent people

Put your brainpower to use in one of these great-paying and challenging fields.

Smart people come in all shapes and sizes. So do smart career choices. A bright NFL quarterback, for example, can read a defense and understand its strengths and weaknesses, all in the blink of an eye. It’s called spatial intelligence, and it’s the same skill that graphic designers use to imagine smart visual solutions that their clients want but can’t articulate.

The bottom line: intelligent people – you know who you are! – are well-suited to certain careers.

These six careers, for example, can be smart options for smart people.

1. Accountant
2. Medical Manager
3. FBI Agent
4. Registered Nurse
5. Computer Systems Administrator
6. Teacher

Keep reading to learn about how you can get into one of these jobs. You’ll be smarter for it…

1 – Accountant

Accountants need to have more than just a knack for numbers. They should also have sound reasoning skills, since the simplest answer is often the right one when dealing with even the most complex calculations.

Education: A quick mind isn’t enough to become an accountant. Formal training matters too. Fortunately, there are plenty of accounting and finance programs that can prepare you for a career as an accountant. A bachelor’s degree is the most common entry-point into the profession.

Average Pay: $67,430

2 – Medical Manager

Health care isn’t just big business; it’s also incredibly complex. As a result, medical managers need a sharp mind and keen business sense to keep up in this ever-evolving industry.

Education: Some medical managers have technical backgrounds, while others are experts in areas like finance or team-building. To qualify for most management roles, you’ll need to earn a bachelor’s degree in an area like health care administration, followed by an MBA.

Average Pay: $90,970
Read more

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