Tag: debt issues

Financial fights that can lead to divorce

Financial fights that can lead to divorce

Much has been written about how difficult economic times forced them to postpone couples divorce. They simply can not afford. The legal fees and accounting fees grow as a union is dissolved and a two-earner family life less than a pair of two single-person households.

As the economy improves, we’ll probably see the divorce rate climb. But even if money woes are not separate couples, financial disputes are still the cause of irreconcilable differences. Here are seven common financial issues that may lead to a divorce:

Paycheck Envy

More women enter the marriage with assets of their own and many earn more than their spouses. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, one in three women married outside her husband wins. This amount increases by more than half if they earn $ 55,000 or more.

Men may feel threatened by not having their bragging rights as traditional breadwinners. For women, this means they have their own money away from the irresponsible action of a companion. With more play, women can not afford to be accepted to their partner how past generations were.

Debt

Utah State University Professor Jeffrey Dew author of a study often cited, which found that couples argue about finances at least once a week are 30% more likely to divorce than those who do sometimes leads to questions of money. Couples with no assets were 70% more likely to divorce compared to couples with assets of $ 10,000.

Cup in the ability to build the assets is dependent upon long-standing American credit card, but it can be a source of optimism. Who raised a record $ 988 million in revolving debt in 2008, the Americans eroded nearly 90 billion dollars last year there, according to the Federal Reserve. credit cards less debt should result in increased savings, more active and potentially more couples happy.

Bills

As part of an investigation last year, Fidelity Investments has found that less than half of couples make the daily decisions and financial issues such as budgeting and paying bills (45%) .

In many couples, one person is still paying the monthly bills at the beginning while the other could wait until the due date and beyond. checks can be cut even more stressful when one blows unnecessary monthly budget shopping and boyfriends do not take kindly to cable or text message their expensive batteries Better Half in the mixture.

Economy

While half of the relationship may be economical, offering dedicated and committed to building a retirement plan, the other may be more carefree, with a live “today, you can not take it with you “Outlook.

Invest

We can assume that investment decisions are increasingly dividing couples if both partners are financially sophisticated. The risk tolerance may be incompatible with the objectives out-of-synch.

Dump Apple or go long can also be a divisive debate that how often a mother-in-law visit. Overlooking an investment portfolio or 401 (k), one spouse may want to explore emerging markets fund, while the other rejects nothing, but in any national security to the large caps and bonds.

Then about a guy find true happiness with a sort of fundamental analysis of the gal?

Different Expectations

There is no shortage of men and women who value money more than love and companionship. You can be quite content to “live love” and weather financial situation “for better or for worse.” But she may feel entitled to a McMansion in a suburb of Tony and a Mercedes in which to drive your children to private school. Trouble is brewing with his latte grand prize.

Secret Stash

Financial infidelity is a newly coined term that describes situations in which one spouse is hiding cash or credit to his companion.

This may seem like a good idea to have a credit card or bank account secret that you can tap into, but your partner will probably be a big scandal in the underground. Beyond financial dishonesty on the screen, such gains may be a warning sign of even greater transgressions – maintaining a slush fund to pay the tab strip club or support a mistress on the sly.

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Debunking the myth of ‘good debt’

Debunking the myth of 'good debt'

Don’t prolong your state of debt by thinking some liabilities are smart to hold.

Think your low-interest mortgage is good debt? Think again. There is some comfort in believing that being in the position of owing money to someone or some company can in some circumstances be “good.” Suze Orman, arguably the world’s most popular personal finance author and guru, explains the supposed difference between “good debt” and “bad debt.” Mortgages and student loans are examples of good debt, while car loans and credit cards are bad. Some debt, like high-interest loans and credit card debt, are certainly worse than others, but rationalizing owing money to others by calling it “good” is a stretch.

When the public is willing to consider any particular type of debt good, the lending industry is the only winner in the long run. For the benefit of our own personal finances, we’ll prosper more by considering all debt bad and striving to eliminate that debt even if we feel it is good.

Don’t fall into the trap of prolonging your state of debt while holding the idea that these forms of owing money are somehow good. Here’s why “good debt” isn’t all that great.

1. Mortgages. A mortgage on a house is a classic example of a type of debt personal finance experts and real estate agents want the world to be at peace with. There is something to be said for mortgages: the reality is that only a small percentage of Americans would be able to afford to purchase a house without access to a loan. The lending industry and the government have historically made it as easy as possible to own a home. We’re not escaping home ownership debt any time soon.

The deeper reality is that the value of real estate increases at or a little higher than the rate of inflation over the long term, but is much more unpredictable over the short term — the length of home ownership most people experience. Some consider mortgages to be good debt because it allows a home owner to be highly leveraged, in a good position for appreciation, but it is risky.

In addition, the tax advantages to paying mortgage interest are frequently overstated. While most taxpayers see an increased refund thanks to the mortgage interest deduction, the benefit can’t compete with not paying interest at all. We’re stuck with mortgages for now, but there’s no solid reason for keeping them around longer than necessary, as one might do with anything called “good.”

2. Student loans. Student loans are an investment in the future; a bachelor’s degree in hand will significantly increase a person’s lifetime income compared with just a high school diploma. Again, the lending industry encourages taking on unnecessary debt, and colleges and universities are complicit.

It is unnecessary to borrow money to finance a college education. In his forthcoming book, Debt Free U: How I Paid for an Outstanding College Education Without Loans, Scholarships, or Mooching off My Parents, author Zac Bissonnette explains how student loans can be more devastating to an individual’s financial condition than a mortgage. Did you know that bankruptcy can eliminate your credit card debt and your mortgage but your student loan will not be forgiven? Even the government will garnish your social security wages if you default on your student loans.

Bissonnette also shows how there is no good reason to borrow money for an expensive private college or Ivy League university when the quality of education you can receive and your earning potential is matched or bested by an inexpensive, local state college. Reconsider the assumption that you pay a higher price for quality.

3. Start-up costs. Whether starting a business requiring an up-front purchase of inventory or have just graduated college and need to buy appropriate attire for a career, some personal finance experts advise the cash-strapped newbie to anticipate tomorrow’s income and pay for your expenses with a credit card or take out a loan today. This, like borrowing money to invest in something without a guaranteed return, is risky.

While it is often true that success requires taking some risks, consider your options for dealing with the worst-case scenario. Unemployment is still at a high level, and many of last year’s graduates are still out of work with credit card balances increasing. Most new businesses fail.

Even borrowing money to finance assets expected to appreciate like a house, a person’s income potential through education, and a career or business carries risks and in some cases can be fully avoided with smart preparation. You may hear some personal finance experts call these types of debt “good,” but they are far from beneficial. At best, they are like other debt but might help improve your financial condition or quality of life at some point. At worst, however, even this debt can devastate your future if not watched, cared for, and eliminated.

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