Tag: career solutions

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

If you’re among the millions of people seeking work, there is more of a social networking site that you may have to join Twitter.

Twitter? For the job search? In the history of Kyle Flaherty. He left a job in marketing at Boston determined to find a job in-house public relations. He tweeted about his decision and included a link to her professional blog, where he described the kind of work he sought. A few days later, his tweet was retweeted. In other words, knowledge was passed – to his current boss.

“I do not think I got it if not for Twitter,” said Flaherty, who moved from Boston to Austin, Texas, for the new job with a pregnant woman and a two year old son.

Twitter basics

Twitter, as you probably know, is the social networking site that lets you send tweets – the equivalent of text messages or status updates from Facebook, but limited to 140 characters. You must keep them very short and simple. To register, simply fill out an online profile. Then you can send tweets and view on your computer, cell phone or mobile internet device. Unlike Facebook, you can follow (receive tweets from) someone, there is no formal process of requesting and accepting.

When you register to monitor tweets from someone, they see that you’re next. It’s a good thing, because they may decide to reciprocate and follow you, too, which is something you want if you are a professional trying to get noticed.

“Twitter gives you access to people you might not otherwise meet or encounter,” says Miriam Salpeter, Career Coach and founder of Keppie Careers in Atlanta.

Join the conversation

Needless to say, not everyone has a job simply tweeting on their employment status. But Twitter, like LinkedIn, Facebook, and industry conferences, is a way to reach out and reach out to people who know the hiring managers or you can submit them.

Many people use Twitter to share ramblings blind, like “having a hamburger with friends this afternoon.” But the most clever Twitterers use to comment on events in their professions. Tweets they follow industry leaders and even to establish informal relations following one another.

If you have never used Twitter, do not sign up immediately and furnaces people with a message saying that you are unemployed. Instead, create a slow dynamics. Open an account and include something about your profession in your username. Since users can search by subject tweets is a way to make your feed more visible.

“I automatically follow back anyone who has a job or jobs in their title,” says Salpeter, whose name is keppie_careers Twitter.

In the profile section, add a few lines about what you do professionally – which also contributes to your searchable.

Before start tweeting, research leaders in your industry, the companies you want to work, and any other professional contacts. Follow them. Many companies – including marketing, public relations, and technology – using Twitter to post job offers, and many hiring managers tweet, too.

“You can hear about jobs, an idea for a business to determine how to interact with them and see how you fit in,” Flaherty said.

Make an impression

Then, start tweeting. Give your opinion on the news, industry events, and seminars. If someone is following you, especially a leader in the industry, says something controversial or interesting, retweet (before), or send the person a direct answer. This may be an ideal way to get a conversation, but more personal.

If you are a hiring manager in a company you want to work out what he or she writes and then adapt your tweets to comment on such things.

This is what John Johansen did when he decided he wanted to leave Boston for a more affordable. It targets marketing professionals in Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, and Austin – and began following their tweets. When someone in the media said something very interesting, he replied with a message @ – public comment. This helped him develop relationships with marketing professionals in the cities. In turn, introduced him to others on Twitter.

As he found he had wanted to work for companies, Johansen Twitter search to locate their employees. In this way, he found the head of human resources for Bulldog Solutions, a marketing agency in Austin. “I had been following their ballots and had an interest in working there,” he said. “I learned of their human resources director has been on Twitter, so I contacted her.” They met, she asked her resume – and he was hired.

“Much of the use of Twitter is that it allowed me to break the ice,” said Johansen. “For a job seeker, it is a way of saying:” I can show you that I am a real person, I see you are a real person, and we have a connection. From the employer side, they can see what a person is talking about when they are on Twitter and how they operate outside of work. ”

Johansen has laid off five months after it began, because of the economic slowdown. He jumped back on Twitter and was used to find freelance work.

“There is nothing revolutionary about such things,” said Flaherty. “It is evolutionary. Back in the day, we sent letters a few years later e-mails, and a few years later we have updated our blogs. The beauty of Twitter is that it’s as if you’re on a network if all the time, in real time. “

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Smart careers for intelligent people

Smart careers for intelligent people

Put your brainpower to use in one of these great-paying and challenging fields.

Smart people come in all shapes and sizes. So do smart career choices. A bright NFL quarterback, for example, can read a defense and understand its strengths and weaknesses, all in the blink of an eye. It’s called spatial intelligence, and it’s the same skill that graphic designers use to imagine smart visual solutions that their clients want but can’t articulate.

The bottom line: intelligent people – you know who you are! – are well-suited to certain careers.

These six careers, for example, can be smart options for smart people.

1. Accountant
2. Medical Manager
3. FBI Agent
4. Registered Nurse
5. Computer Systems Administrator
6. Teacher

Keep reading to learn about how you can get into one of these jobs. You’ll be smarter for it…

1 – Accountant

Accountants need to have more than just a knack for numbers. They should also have sound reasoning skills, since the simplest answer is often the right one when dealing with even the most complex calculations.

Education: A quick mind isn’t enough to become an accountant. Formal training matters too. Fortunately, there are plenty of accounting and finance programs that can prepare you for a career as an accountant. A bachelor’s degree is the most common entry-point into the profession.

Average Pay: $67,430

2 – Medical Manager

Health care isn’t just big business; it’s also incredibly complex. As a result, medical managers need a sharp mind and keen business sense to keep up in this ever-evolving industry.

Education: Some medical managers have technical backgrounds, while others are experts in areas like finance or team-building. To qualify for most management roles, you’ll need to earn a bachelor’s degree in an area like health care administration, followed by an MBA.

Average Pay: $90,970
Read more

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How you’ll find your next job in recession time

How you'll find your next job in recession time

Most job seekers have the best chance of finding a job through friends and contacts, given that nearly one third of external hires were found through referrals, despite the multitude of ways for companies to find job applicants. This suggests that, despite millions of CVs drawn across the Web during the past two years, the time for job seekers could be better spent knocking their friends for occasions where they work.

Online sites for job search are fully aware of this dilemma, the search for employment has changed considerably online, but hiring still relies on old relationships, they are finding new ways to allow both methods.

You can find your next job with a school friend who lost a long time with you reconnected on Facebook. In job search site SimplyHired.com, a partner of U.S. News, job seekers can connect to their Facebook accounts and allow Simply Hired access to details of work history profiles of friends. ” The site then lists all your friends and their employers. Click on their employers, and you will see all job openings currently listed on Simply Hired.

You can send a message to a friend directly over the opening. The site also shows that companies employ the largest number of your friends, cities that friends are more likely to live in, and employment in companies that you indicated a preference in your Facebook profile. Simply Hired is not the only search engine offering a chance to find a job through friends Facebook Indeed.com has a Facebook application that allows users to watch the openings where their friends work.

“The basic idea here is that the world when you look in the offline and you start a job search, you usually go to a number of friends and say,” Do you know of any major companies? Are there good jobs in your company that you know? “Said Simply Hired CEO Gautam Godhwani. “That was how much of the recruitment was done in the past. … And I think that is what you see here, you are seeing Simply Hired take what has always been a very efficient process offline and upload. “Simply Hired earlier launched an application for LinkedIn that allow users to check if they have connections to employers that they are interested in.

Integration with Facebook may not be meaningful in the early years of the site where it was largely the domain of college students who were there to socialize. Today, with nearly half a billion users, Facebook is the personal mark for turf professionals and middle-aged Generation Y will-and-comers. It is a place where businesses all new products and track job applicants. Despite all the controversy privacy, most users still choose to include personal stories and working details on their profiles. “I think we are entering a new era of job search is much, much more personalized,” Godhwani said. “The foundation said that today’s users have much more information about themselves Online. ”

The company has followed the debate about privacy, Godhwani said. On the one hand, integration Simply Hired leaves no trace on your profile so your Facebook friends do not know what you are looking for a job. Therefore, the objective of privacy for most users is the control and integration of Simply Hired is opt-in only.

Accessibility is an area of ongoing development among search engines work. Job Search Site LinkUp.com is currently awaiting approval of an application for Apple iPad would allow users to search for jobs, create job alerts and job Email to similar functions Friends of those applications LinkUp smartphones, but it is much easier to apply for jobs directly on the IPAD, Thanks to its size. The goal is to transform LinkUp as unemployed transform-“regardless of their usage patterns and behaviors and their adoption of technology,” says managing director Toby Dayton.

LinkUp has found that users spend between 10 and 11 minutes, on average, its smart phone applications, “said Dayton. They are seeking employment who are not likely to be at home, near a computer. Instead, the mobile application allows people to seek employment anywhere, anytime, “When people see a company or brand and something triggers an idea in their head,” said Dayton.

They could be at a party where they met someone who works for a company interested in. They can do a job search immediately, then save the search for later. “Ideally, the application enables people to improve their research and think more thoroughly about the type of jobs and careers they want, the type of companies they want to work for the types of roles and responsibilities that will bring satisfaction in their lives, “says Dayton.

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