And those who were seen dancing and more by Friedrich Nietzsche

“And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music.”

“Without music, life would be a mistake.”

“It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages.”

“That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

“I’m not upset that you lied to me, I’m upset that from now on I can’t believe you.”

“And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music.”

“It is hard enough to remember my opinions, without also remembering my reasons for them!”

“There is always some madness in love. But there is also always some reason in madness.”

“You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”

“Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you.”

“You must have chaos within you to give birth to a dancing star.”

“In heaven, all the interesting people are missing.”

“Sometimes people don’t want to hear the truth because they don’t want their illusions destroyed.”

“There are no facts, only interpretations.”

“We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once.”

“The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends.”

“The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.”

“I cannot believe in a God who wants to be praised all the time.”

“He who has a why to live for can bear almost any how.”

“No one can construct for you the bridge upon which precisely you must cross the stream of life, no one but you yourself alone.”

Art Gallery – Heart Notes Panel Wall Art

Art - Heart Notes Panel Wall Art
Art – Heart Notes Panel Wall Art by RomoMonroe
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Matte Wall Panel (14×11)

Decorate your space with custom Wall Panels that are as unique as they are versatile. Mix and match your pieces with traditional art and canvas prints for a fresh wall! Your custom photos and art are directly printed on MDF, a durable substrate that produces vibrant images for long term display. These wall panels are heavy weight with beautifully burnished sides that add character.

Dimensions: 14″ (length) x 11″ (width) x 0.75″ (height).
Printed using UV high-res printing, producing vibrant, long lasting images.
Designed with a key-hole for easy hanging.
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Designer Tip: To ensure the highest quality print, please note this product’s customizable design area measures 14″ x 11″.

10 Things you may not know about the Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge opened to the public on May 24, 1883, thereby connecting Manhattan with Brooklyn for the first time. Dubbed the “Eighth Wonder of the World,” early visitors gawked at its immense granite towers and thick steel cables, not to mention its birds-eye views. The bridge, which took 14 years and around $15 million to complete, remains among New York City’s top tourist attractions and a busy thoroughfare for commuters. On its 130th birthday, here are 10 things you may not know about the frequently photographed landmark.

1. Boss Tweed helped get the project started.

William M. “Boss” Tweed, the infamously corrupt head of New York City’s Tammany Hall political machine, latched on to the Brooklyn Bridge project from the very beginning. According to sworn testimony he gave later, he facilitated up to $65,000 in bribes to New York’s aldermen in order to win their backing for a $1.5 million bond issue.

He then became a major holder of bridge stock and joined a committee charged with managing the project’s finances. Tweed allegedly hoped to skim money from the city’s bridge contracts, much as he had done with other large public works. But he was arrested in 1871 before he could fully realize his plan. It has since been estimated that Tweed and his cronies stole at least $45 million, and perhaps as much as $200 million, from the public coffers during their time in power.

2. At least 20 people died during the bridge’s construction.

The first fatality came in 1869 before construction had even begun. German-born John A. Roebling, who designed the bridge, was taking compass readings one afternoon when his foot was crushed between some pilings and a boat. His toes were amputated, and a few weeks later he died of tetanus.

Other workers fell off the 276-foot-high towers, were hit by falling debris or succumbed to caisson disease, better known as “the bends. “No official figure exists for the number of men killed, but estimates range from 20 to over 30. Dozens more suffered debilitating injuries, including Roebling’s son Washington, who became bedridden with the bends after taking over as chief engineer from his father.

3. It was the longest suspension bridge in the world—by far.

A few high-profile collapses in the first half of the 19th century prevented suspension bridges from immediately catching on. Undeterred, Roebling figured out how to stabilize them, largely by adding a web truss to either side of the roadway platform. He built four suspension bridges in the 1850s and 1860s, including one over the Ohio River and another near Niagara Falls. All would later be dwarfed by the Brooklyn Bridge, which, with a main span of more just over 1,595 feet, was by far the longest suspension bridge in the world. It remained that way until 1903, when the nearby Williamsburg Bridge overtook it by 4.5 feet.

4. The bridge opened with a massive celebration.

Huge crowds gathered on May 24, 1883, to watch the bridge’s opening ceremony, which The New York Times described, in reference to Brooklyn, as “the greatest gala day in the history of that moral suburb.” President Chester A. Arthur, New York Governor (and future president) Grover Cleveland and various local politicians marched onto the bridge, accompanied by a military band and an attachment of troops.

Celebratory cannon fire rang out when they reached the Manhattan-side tower. The festivities also included an hour-long fireworks display, receptions and a number of speeches. Just before midnight the bridge opened to the public, and more than 150,000 people streamed across over the next 24 hours. Not everyone was happy, however. Many Irish boycotted the ceremony because it coincided with the birthday of British monarch Queen Victoria.

5. A tragedy occurred almost immediately.

A week after the opening, on Memorial Day, an estimated 20,000 people were on the bridge when a panic started, allegedly over a rumor that it was about to collapse. Twelve people were crushed to death on a narrow stairway, and others emerged bloodied and in some cases without clothes. One eyewitness described men and women “with their limbs contorted and their faces purpling in their agonized efforts to breathe.” No changes came about in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy, except that more police were stationed on the pedestrian promenade.

6. The bridge toll was higher then than it is now.

When the Brooklyn Bridge first opened, it cost a penny to cross by foot, 5 cents for a horse and rider and 10 cents for a horse and wagon. Farm animals were allowed at a price of 5 cents per cow and 2 cents per sheep or hog. Under pressure from civic groups and commuters, the pedestrian toll was repealed in 1891.

The roadway tolls were then rescinded in 1911 with the support of New York Mayor William J. Gaynor, who declared, “I see no more reason for toll gates on the bridges than for toll gates on Fifth Avenue or Broadway.” The Brooklyn Bridge and three other bridges that likewise cross the East River have stayed free ever since for both walkers and drivers, even as New York’s other major bridges and tunnels have gotten steadily more expensive.

7. At the time, the bridge connected two different cities.

Brooklyn did not become part of New York City until 1898, following a referendum that passed there by just 277 votes (out of more than 129,000 cast). Prior to the merger, it was the fourth most populous city in the country—behind only New York, Chicago and Philadelphia—with loads of manufacturing jobs, many churches, relatively low crime and good schools.

8. The bridge quickly became a cultural sensation.

The Brooklyn Bridge has arguably inspired more art than any other manmade structure in the United States. Georgia O’Keeffe, Andy Warhol and dozens of other well-known painters have incorporated it into their works, as have photographers (Walker Evans); documentarians (Ken Burns); playwrights (Arthur Miller); novelists (Henry Miller); newspaper columnists (Jimmy Breslin); urban historians (Lewis Mumford); poets (Jack Kerouac); and musicians (Wyclef Jean).

It likewise has had a slew of TV shows and movie cameos, including “The Docks of New York,” “It Happened in Brooklyn,” “Moonstruck,” “Godzilla” and “Spider-Man.” Meanwhile, advertisers have used the bridge to sell everything from Vaseline to Absolut Vodka, and it is even the symbol of an Italian chewing gum.

9. The bridge has always attracted daredevils and showmen.

Circus entertainer P.T. Barnum took 21 elephants over the bridge in May 1884 to show that it was safe. The following year, Robert E. Odlum, a swimming instructor from Washington, D.C., became the first to leap into the East River below. He died, but a number of later jumpers survived, including one man allegedly trying to impress his girlfriend and another who wore large canvas wings. Other stuntmen have flown planes under the bridge and bungee jumped from or climbed its towers.

  1. Peregrine falcons nest atop it.

Peregrine falcons are the fastest animals on record, capable of reaching speeds over 200 miles per hour. They disappeared from the eastern United States due to DDT poisoning, but made a comeback after the pesticide was banned in 1972. Surprisingly, the birds soon began thriving in New York City, where they nest on bridges, church steeples and skyscrapers. Today, about 16 pairs of peregrines live in the Big Apple, and the Brooklyn Bridge has become one of their regular nesting sites.

The Gilded Age of American Civilization

The ways in which society may amuse itself around, in any country and at any time, an exceptional opportunity for the display of wealth and the assertion of social importance. Thorstein Veblen has graphically demonstrated this conscious or unconscious motivation in many forms of recreation.

It is clearly evident throughout American social history. The worthy citizens of eighteenth-century Philadelphia vied with each other in the magnificence of their banquets, loading their tables with massive silver plate and serving such a choice selection of imported wines that the visiting John Adams stood amazed at the “sinful feasts.”

The planters of Virginia rode to hounds in close imitation of the English country squires whose social status they sought to emulate in every possible way. Merchants of New York and Boston were already aspiring to yachts in the 1850’s, their sons to membership in the exclusive boating clubs, while all the fashionable world sought out Saratoga or Newport as a step upward on the social ladder.

It was in the latter half of the 19th century, however, the Gilded Age of American civilization, that society most flagrantly bent its pleasures to display. The newly rich born of industry’s great advance since the Civil War-owners of railways, coppermines, textile-mills, steel-plants, packing-houses, and cattle ranches.

A little band of idle rich held the final redoubt in the fashionable world of the 1880’s and 1890’s, and the families of the new plutocracy felt it essential to prove beyond shadow of doubt that they too were idle and rich. It was not in the American tradition, which esteemed riches and abhorred idleness, but urban society was running after strange gods. And, in any event, the new plutocrats generally supplied the riches and left it to willing wives and a younger generation to demonstrate the idleness.

Concert singing, visits by foreign musicians, and orchestral playing also revealed a growing taste among the sophisticated for more serious music. Jenny Lind had paved the way for the tours of European artists in the middle of the century, and Ole Bull had made two memorable visits. In the 1890’s Ysaye, Paderewski, Fritz Kreisler, Adelina Patti, Melba, Calvéé, and Madame Schumann-Heink were all on tour. Symphonic music had had its start with the organization of the New York Philharmonic as early as 1842, but it was not until 1878 that this orchestra had any real rival. In that year the New York Symphony Orchestra was established, to be followed in another three years by the Boston Symphony, and in 1891 by the Chicago Orchestra. Walter Damrosch and Theodore Thomas were adding a new interest to the musical scene.

Grand opera also had become firmly established. It had long been a distinctive feature of the social life of New Orleans, and there had been various attempts to introduce it in New York and other cities. Troupes of Italian singers had come and gone; elaborate opera houses had been opened-usually to fail after one or two seasons. “Will this splendid and refined amusement be supported in New York?” we find Philip Hone asking in 1833. “I am doubtful.” And for almost half a century his doubts were largely justified. It was in 1883 that the Metropolitan Opera House, costing nearly $2,000,000, provided grand opera with its first really permanent home in America.

With the first post-war boom in the 1860’s, observers began to note that New York society was becoming entirely based upon wealth, social prestige being won by those who had the most splendid carriages, drawing-rooms, and opera boxes. George Makepeace Towle has described the balls and assemblies-ladies in sparkling tiaras, suppers of oysters and champagne, fountains gushing wine or sprays of perfume. He was somewhat horrified by “so unceasing a round of glittering gaiety and dissipation.”

The advance of the new millionaires was picturesquely described as “the Gold Rush” by representatives of older social traditions. “From an unofficial oligarchy of aristocrats,” Mrs. John King Van Rensselaer sadly wrote, “society was transformed into an extravagant body that set increasing store by fashion and display.”

Nor was New York alone in this competitive rage for showy display. A sycophant press might boast that its ornate fancy-dress balls and ten-thousand-dollar dinner parties were the most expensive ever known, but the world of fashion throughout the land was closely following its lead. There was an epidemic of gaudy magnificence in the amusements of what went for society. One Chicago magnate brought an entire theatrical company from New York to entertain a group of his friends, and a wealthy woman in another city engaged a large orchestra to serenade her new-born child. San Francisco was notorious for its “terribly fast so-called society set, engrossed by the emptiest and most trivial pleasures.” A fortunate miner who had struck it rich in Virginia City drove a coach and four with silver harness; another had champagne running from the taps at his wedding party.

All About Giza Pyramid Complex in Egypt

The Giza pyramid complex is an archaeological site on the Giza Plateau, on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. This complex of ancient monuments includes the three pyramid complexes known as the Great Pyramids, the massive sculpture known as the Great Sphinx, several cemeteries, a workers’ village and an industrial complex. It is located approximately 9 km (5 mi) west into the Libyan Desert from the Nile river at the old town of Giza, and about 13 km (8 mi) southwest of Cairo city centre.

The pyramids, which have historically loomed large as emblems of ancient Egypt in the Western imagination, were popularised in Hellenistic times, when the Great Pyramid was listed by Antipater of Sidon as one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It is by far the oldest of the ancient Wonders and the only one still in existence.

The Pyramids of Giza consist of the Great Pyramid of Giza (also known as the Pyramid of Cheops or Khufu and constructed c. 2560–2540 BC), the somewhat smaller Pyramid of Khafre (or Chephren) a few hundred meters to the south-west, and the relatively modest-sized Pyramid of Menkaure (or Mykerinos) a few hundred meters further south-west. The Great Sphinx lies on the east side of the complex. Current consensus among Egyptologists is that the head of the Great Sphinx is that of Khafre. Along with these major monuments are a number of smaller satellite edifices, known as “queens” pyramids, causeways and valley pyramids.

Black Hills National Forest Canvas Print

Black Hills National Forest Canvas Print
Black Hills National Forest Canvas Print by SeeAmerica
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Black Hills National Forest Canvas Print

Illustrated by Matt Brass. Matt is an art director, family man, and filmmaker in Knoxville, Tennessee. He has been in marketing and advertising for 14 years. He has worked on various national accounts but has not lost his first love, illustration and design. Black Hills National Forest is located in southwestern South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming.

The forest has an area of over 1.25 million acres and is managed by the Forest Service. Forest headquarters are located in Custer, South Dakota. This design is from Creative Action Network’s See America collection. Over 75 years after the government first commissioned posters to showcase the country’s most stunning natural features under the banner: “See America,” the Creative Action Network (CAN) & National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) have set out to do it again by launching a new version of See America, enlisting artists and designers from all 50 states to create a new collection of artwork celebrating our shared national parks and other treasured sites.

Cameron Diaz Career Milestones

Cameron Diaz Career Milestones

Born: Cameron Michelle Diaz
Date of Birth: 30 August 1972
Birth Place: San Diego, California, USA
Height: 5′ 8½” (1,74 m)

Born in San Diego, CA, on August 30, 1972, Diaz left school at 16 to become a model. For the next five years, she traveled the globe, working in Japan, Australia, Mexico, Morocco, and Paris. As a model for the Elite Agency, she did commercial work for such products as Coke, Nivea, and L.A. Gear.

She returned to California at the age of 21 and was unknown in the film industry when she was cast in her breakthrough role as the target of Jim Carrey’s hyper-animated lust in The Mask. Following the hoopla surrounding her performance — or, more specifically, her physical appearance — in the film, Diaz opted to take acting lessons and appear in a series of small, independent films, including The Last Supper (1995), She’s the One (1996), and Feeling Minnesota (1996).

After starring opposite Ewan McGregor in Danny Boyle’s A Life Less Ordinary, Diaz further endeared herself to audiences and critics with her performance in My Best Friend’s Wedding (1997). Proving herself an acceptable foil for the film’s star, Julia Roberts, she went on to greater success in the Farrelly brothers’ There’s Something About Mary in 1998. Starring as the film’s titular heroine, Diaz turned in an audience-pleasing performance in the cheerfully bawdy film, which proved to be one of the year’s biggest box-office successes.

Cameron Diaz Career Milestones

The same year, Diaz made a cameo appearance in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and starred as Jon Favreau’s unhinged fiancée in the black comedy Very Bad Things. Now fully established as one of Hollywood’s hottest properties, she went on to take lead roles in 1999’s Being John Malkovich, in which she played puppeteer John Cusack’s wife, and Any Given Sunday, in which she played the president and co-owner of a football team in Oliver Stone’s paean to American football.

In 2000 Diaz joined Drew Barrymore and Lucy Liu in Charlie’s Angels, the much-hyped big-screen remake of the television classic. A comically self-aware and fairly faithful adaptation of the original series, Charlie’s Angels served up Matrix-style action with retro-sensibilities, propelling the franchise into the new millennium.

The following year found Diaz endearing herself to younger audiences as the voice of Princess Fiona in the animated box-office smash Shrek, as well as using her wide eyed innocence to horrific effect in the Tom Cruise mindbender Vanilla Sky. Headlining the ill-fated comedy The Next Best Thing in 2002, Diaz would take a historical trip to the birthplace of America in director Martin Scorsese’s Gangs of New York before becoming the second (after Julia Roberts actress to join the “$20 Million Club” with Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle. Though the film would perform only moderately well at the box office, fans could be sure that they would get plenty more Diaz as production on Shrek 2 and Fun with Dick and Jane began to kick into full gear.

The anytime, anywhere workout

The anytime, anywhere workout

Seventeen Magazine beauty editor, Annmarie lverson, reveals her own very personal fitness routine-one that you can do when and where you like.

1. Warm Up

Okay, I admit it. I do work out almost everyday. And no, I’m not crazy. I’m just really interested in feeling distressed and looking streamlined in my clothes. But I also have to admit I wasn’t always a jock.

In high school (in Wisconsin, where I’m from) I never had the nerve to try out for volleyball or cheerleading. College at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee was the same story-no intramural sports, no rahrah activities. But in freshman-required PE, I discovered that being in shape didn’t depend on making the team, scoring big points, or showing up for practices.

Instead, the instructor showed me how to become my own personal trainer and create my own routine. How easy is it? You just do an aerobic activity to get your heart going and calisthenics to tone and shape your entire body. You can do it alone, or with a friend. So here’s the workout that works for me… where I want, when I want.

You have to ease your body into a workout. All it takes is TEN MINUTES of nonstop brisk walking, easy jogging, or cycling. Your PORTABLEGYM should include a Jump rope, resistance bands, weights (one to three pounds) and sport shoes.

2. Stretch

Go directly from the warm-up to stretches while your muscles are still warm and you have a maximum range of motion.

1 Sit on ground with legs spread to sides. “Walk” hands out from body as far as is comfortable. (If you exercise with a friend, you can ease each other into a stretch by putting your feet together and clasping hands.)

2 While still sitting, place soles of feet together. Grasp ankles with hands, and use elbows to push knees toward ground. Don’t bounce-just press up and down gently.

3 While standing, wrap a band (or a towel) across up per back, and pull while TWISTING torso from left to right until movement feels easy.

4 Slide band up, behind shoulders, and pull shoulders from side to side.

3. Aerobic

This is the key calorie-burning, fattrimming part of the workout. The trick is to get your heart rate up to an aerobic level for about twenty minutes. Do this with one activity (like running, cycling, or swimming) or do a COMBINATION of two or more activities.

1 Jump back and forth over a friend or a small table. Jumping in the air exerts an amazing amount of ENERGY and sends the heart rate up-just be sure to keep up the pace.

2 When you jump rope, keep feet together and shoulders relaxed. Jump just high enough to clear the rope.

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The Real Story of Rosie the Riveter

The Real Story of Rosie the Riveter

Until World War II, the automobile industry has been a predominantly male bastion. But with so many men called to serve, more women than ever looking for employment. While their fathers, son, husband and friends fought in Europe and Asia, women served the war effort right at home by filling quickly and competently.

In 1943, two years after the U.S. entered the war, more than 30 percent of Ford workers in the machining and assembly departments were women. Women built jeeps, aircraft B-24, and tractors. They even flew planes, becoming test pilots of the B-24 that were built for the war effort. They operated drills, welding tools, heavy machinery and casting as Rose-Monroe-riveting guns.

The term “Rosie the Riveter” was first used in 1942 in a song recorded by the conductor popular Kay Kyser large, which becomes a national hit. The song depicts “Rosie” as a line worker tirelessly, doing his part to help the American war effort. Although the song was inspired by Rosalind P. Walter, Rosie the Riveter became more closely associated with another real woman, Rose Monroe, Michigan, who moved to the Second World War. Rose Monroe was left a widow with two young children after her husband was killed in a car accident. Like millions of other women in America, she joined the staff to respond to a call to arms and to support his family.

The Real Story of Rosie the Riveter

She worked as a riveter at the Willow Run Aircraft Factory in Ypsilanti, Michigan, building B-29 and B-24 bombers for the U.S. Air Forces of the Army. Because Monroe happened to best fit the description of the worker described in the “Rosie the Rivert” song, she asked to star in a promotional film about the war effort at home. Rosie went on to become perhaps the most widely recognized icon of that era. The films and posters she appeared in were used to encourage women to go to work to support the war effort.

When the war ended, and his wife Rose Monroe colleagues in times of war were sent home for returning soldiers could return to work before the war. But women had made their point, and had changed the American workplace forever. Monroe has realized his dream of piloting a plane when she was in her 50.

After the war was over, gender was added to the non-discrimination clause in the contract between the company and the UAW in 1946, another indication of the changing times and the impact that “Rosie the Riveter “had on industrial production at Ford Motor Company and elsewhere. In the decades that followed, the law caught up with the changes, and more women have taken their rightful place in the boardroom and on the factory floor.

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All About Orient Express

The Orient Express was the name of a long-distance passenger train service created in 1883 by Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits (CIWL). The route and rolling stock of the Orient Express changed many times. Several routes in the past concurrently used the Orient Express name, or slight variants thereof. Although the original Orient Express was simply a normal international railway service, the name has become synonymous with intrigue and luxury travel. The two city names most prominently associated with the Orient Express are Paris and Constantinople (Istanbul), the original endpoints of the timetabled service.

The Orient Express was a showcase of luxury and comfort at a time when travelling was still rough and dangerous. CIWL soon developed a dense network of luxury trains all over Europe, whose names are still remembered today and associated with the art of luxury travel – the Blue Train, the Golden Arrow, North Express and many more.

All About Orient Express

In 1977, the Orient Express stopped serving Istanbul. Its immediate successor, a through overnight service from Paris to Vienna, ran for the last time from Paris on Friday, June 8, 2007. After this, the route, still called the “Orient Express”, was shortened to start from Strasbourg instead, occasioned by the inauguration of the LGV Est which affords much shorter travel times from Paris to Strasbourg. The new curtailed service left Strasbourg at 22:20 daily, shortly after the arrival of a TGV from Paris, and was attached at Karlsruhe to the overnight sleeper service from Amsterdam to Vienna.

On 14 December 2009, the Orient Express ceased to operate and the route disappeared from European railway timetables, reportedly a “victim of high-speed trains and cut-rate airlines”. The Venice-Simplon Orient Express train, a private venture by Orient-Express Hotels Ltd. using original CIWL carriages from the 1920s and 30s, continues to run from London to Venice and to other destinations in Europe, including the original route from Paris to Istanbul. In March 2014 Orient-Express Hotels Ltd. was renamed Belmond.