Category: Credit Cards

Lines of Credit and Other Types of Borrowing

Lines of Credit and Other Types of Borrowing

As suggested above, there are many similarities between lines of credit and other types of borrowing, but there are also many important differences that borrowers need to understand.

Credit cards

Like credit cards, lines of credit effectively have preset limits – you are approved to borrow a certain amount of money and no more. Also like credit cards, policies for going over that limit vary with the lender, though banks tend to be less willing than credit cards to immediately approve overages (instead they often look to renegotiate the line of credit and increase the borrowing limit). Also like credit cards, the loan is essentially pre-approved and the money can be accessed whenever the borrower wants, for whatever use the borrower intends. Lastly, while credit cards and lines of credit may have annual fees, neither charge interest until/unless there is an outstanding balance.

Unlike credit cards, lines of credit can be secured with real property. Prior to the housing crash, Home Equity Lines of Credit (HELOCs) were very popular with both lending officers and borrowers. While HELOCs are harder to get now, they are still available and tend to carry lower interest rates. Credit cards will always have monthly minimum payments and companies will significantly increase the interest rate if those payments are not met. Lines of credit may, or may not, have similar immediate monthly repayment requirements.

Lines of Credit and Other Types of Borrowing

Loans

Like a traditional loan, a line of credit requires acceptable credit and repayment of the funds, and charges interest on any funds borrowed. Also like a loan, taking out, using, and repaying a line of credit can improve a borrower’s credit score.

Unlike a loan, which generally is for a fixed amount, for a fixed time, with a prearranged repayment schedule, there is much greater flexibility with a line of credit. There are also typically fewer restrictions on the use of funds borrowed under a line of credit – a mortgage must go towards the purchase of the listed property and an auto loan must go towards the specified car, but a line of credit can be used at the discretion of the borrower.

Pawn Loan / Payday Loan

There are some superficial similarities between lines of credit and payday loans, but that is really only due to the fact that many payday loan borrowers are “frequent flyers” that frequently borrow, repay, and/or extend their loans (paying very high fees and interest along the way). Likewise, a pawnshop or payday lender does not care what a borrower uses the funds for, so long as the fees/loans are paid/repaid.

The differences, however, are more considerable. For anyone who can qualify for a line of credit, the cost of funds will be dramatically lower than for a payday/pawn loan. By the same token, the credit evaluation process is much simpler and less demanding for a payday/pawn loan (there may be no credit check at all) and the process is much, much quicker. It is also the case that payday lenders will seldom lend the amounts of money often approved in lines of credit (and banks will seldom bother with lines of credit as small as the average payday or pawn loan).

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Sorry, your card was declined

Sorry, your card was declined

You never want to hear your waiter say, “Sorry, your card was declined.” For people with bad credit, hard times are inevitable. When they occur, you can dig a deep hole and crawl in, but there are better ways to respond. Here are the most common scenarios involving embarrassing credit and answers most worthy.

1. “I’m sorry sir, but your card was declined.”

When a boy says these terrifying words, you are bound to flush crimson dining companions as speculate on the state of your finances.

Squelch panic, “said John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education. Explain calmly that the tape may have been damaged, and make another card for the purchase. If she was denied because you are maxed out, however, and you have no plastic or other cash, excuse yourself and call the creditor to request an “opt-in for overlimit fees.“” This will allow operations overlimit to fill, “says Ulzheimer. You will be assessed a fee, but your reputation will be saved.

2. “Er, Jane, we need to discuss this issue before you pay.”

It’s awful to be sued for a debt, but it is horrible when your employer receives an order for garnishment of wages, a part of your salary should be given to your creditor.

Do not wait until the sheriff to serve hits the paper, said the trust expert Delores Pressley. Be proactive and request a meeting with your boss, saying: “I am terribly sorry that a personal question has extended to the workplace. I’ll find a solution as quickly as possible. “This straightforward approach may compensate for a negative opinion of your supervisor. Also, you can not be fired for garnishment (unless there was more than one in a period of 12 months), which may inspire some confidence.

3. “Rent to you with your bad credit? Ha!”

Ready to sign a lease? If your credit is terrible, you could be in the same humiliation that Matthew and Fiona Peters, Madison, Wisconsin, experienced. As newlyweds, Peters thought they had found the perfect apartment. Yet in the rental office crowded, the agent announced loudly: “There is no way that we can rent with your credit. It is bad… very bad. “Every parent called and asked for help in vain.” After the second call, we sat there red-faced, wondering what we were supposed to do or say next, “said Matthew Peters.” It was emasculating! ”

Today, Peters offers advice to others in similar situations, “Keep your cool and do not take it personally seen a high level for all residents not only protects the property owner’s investment, but people living there as well.. “Focus on your finer points.” You could say: “My credit is bad, but I’m busy and make it a point to always pay for my first home,” said Peters. You may need to sweeten the deal by offering a co-signer, doubling the deposit or to pay rent in advance.

4. “Great, once we see your credit file, we can complete your job application.”

credit checks pre-employment are the norm today – and you’ll want to hide if yours is full of big balances, late payments and accounts written off.

Sure, you can deny access to your reports, but it could encourage the hiring manager to build your resume. So stand tall and to disclose past problems at the front. Honesty can not increase your chances. And relax on shamefully low credit rating. “The credit bureaus and their professional organization (the consumption data Industry Association) have publicly stated countless times stating that they do not provide credit ratings and audit reports of the working credit” says Ulzheimer.

5. “Darling, I can not wait to start a life with you – buy a house, have children …”

Have terrible credit, but in the beginning of a long term relationship? Assuming it can be scary. Like it or not, you must reveal the horrible truth. Then, commit to open communication and make amends, “said Joe Rubino, author of” Self-esteem book.”

“Contact all debtors, make arrangements to clean the debts, start a savings plan, cut credit cards and take full responsibility for the management of future purchases responsibly.” Strengthen your skills and your faith life partner through financial counseling, therapy or life coaching.

6. “I need to talk with Mary about a bill pending.”

Whether calls or messages collection go to your workplace, roommate or relative, your private situation will become public. First, the end of the phone calls. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act prohibits collectors third discuss your debt with anyone but you. And while they may contact you at work if you ask them to stop, they should.

Tell them you know the law and that you will file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, if they persist. Then, “said Rubino, act with integrity and clean up your mess of money. “This done, he is afraid of anyone except your own. If you feel the need to explain calls to anyone, just say you made financial arrangements to settle debts and the case is supported “.

7. “OK, Phil, go ahead and charge those costs and we will reimburse you.”

A business trip is imminent and you are supposed to book a hotel room, flight or rental car. Uh oh, you have no credit. Do not worry, you’re not the only one not charging fees. About 29 percent of Americans live without credit. Suffice it to say that you only use cash, and ask to be paid with corporate funds or corporate card. Few employers balk at such a reasonable request.

Is it easy to deal with these credit problems mortifying gracefully? Of course not. But keep in mind that even a show of assurance from the air – and feel – better than avoidance.

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10 smart ideas for reducing credit card debt

10 smart ideas for reducing credit card debt

A $10 purchase can help you save more than $40 a month — and get you started on paring down what you owe.

If you find yourself falling deeper into credit card trouble, it’s time to take a hard look at what’s coming in, what’s going out and see where you can free up some cash quickly to start hacking away at your debt.

Some trims may seem small, but if you package several of them together, you can soon get started on a respectable payment plan. Here are some ideas for places to turn first.

1. Cell Phones

“For $9.88, you can buy a TracFone (prepaid cell phone) with pretty decent coverage and pay by the minute,” says Mike Sullivan, director of education at Take Charge America in Phoenix. “And if you’re careful, you can end up saving $40 to $50 a month off a typical $80 cell phone bill.” He also recommends canceling your land line unless you have medical issues that may require emergency calls.

2. Cable / Satellite

Most people can save money just by getting rid of the extra pay packages they have — such as premium movie channels and extra services. “If you’re really in trouble, cancel the whole package,” Sullivan says. Check out the library for free movies, DVDs and CDs to bridge the entertainment gap.

3. Homeowners Insurance and Car Insurance

By increasing the deductible of your policy from $500 to $1,000, you can see big decreases on your premium, says Michael Barry, vice president of media relations for Insurance Information Institute in New York. “People pay about $880 a year, so if I can knock $88 off, it’s a start.” Regarding auto insurance, take a look at your collision insurance if you have an older car. If you have even a fender-bender, sometimes the cost to repair the car would be more than it’s worth, so perhaps you could cancel the collision insurance altogether.

First, look up the value of the car at Kelley Blue Book, Edmunds.com or the National Automobile Dealers Association, then check the collision line on your auto insurance bill and see what it’s worth to you to keep that insurance. Also, if you don’t drive that car much, look for a discount. “If you drive from 7,000 to 7,500 miles a year, you can often qualify for low-mileage discounts,” Barry says.
4. Transportation

Americans are increasingly finding alternatives here. In fact, consumers spent 11 percent less last year in this category, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2009 Consumer Expenditures Survey released in October. If you have more than one car, this may be the time to look at downsizing to just one car and getting around with better planning, carpooling, bike riding, public transportation or car sharing. Car-sharing companies such as Zipcar operate in a growing number of cities and on many university campuses. You can rent a car by the hour when you have to have one without the expense of insuring and maintaining your own car.

5. Utilities

“People often overlook programmable thermostats,” says Edward Tonini, director of education of Alliance Credit Counseling in Charlotte, N.C. “You can spend $20 to get a programmable thermostat and if you set it right, it can save you $100 over the course of a year easily.”

6. Food

Households spent an average of just more than $300 a month on food eaten at home and about $215 per month on food outside the home in 2009, the BLS survey reported. “Maybe eating out isn’t necessary for you,” Tonini says. “Packing lunches and eating at home will lower your discretionary spending.”

7. Gym Membership

Are you really using it multiple times a week? Divide your monthly dues by the number of times you go in a month and get a realistic picture of what you’re spending on a one-hour workout. Park districts or community centers often have low-cost or free programs. Also check into exercise videos or a piece of home exercise equipment that you would use regularly. If you decide to keep the membership, check to see whether the facility offers discounts for coming at off-peak times.

8. Movies

A family of four can quickly rack up nearly $100 on one movie with popcorn, drinks and maybe even parking fees. “Instead of going to the movies, have a game night at home. It sounds kind of corny, but it will be more meaningful than sitting in the dark when you can’t talk to each other,” says Dave Gilbreath, a regional director with Apprisen Financial Advocates in Yakima, Wash.

9. Tax Relief

Wendy Burkholder, executive director of Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Hawaii in Honolulu, says, “Many of the families we work with are struggling with credit card debt because of loss of income. One of the first things to do is re-evaluate your tax withholding on your paycheck (if your spouse or partner has lost a job). If you don’t make the change, you end up with a whopping refund. You don’t need the money a year from now, you need it now.” If you’re overpaying taxes, you’re also giving the government a free loan and are likely putting off paying for your own bills, which can lead to fees and penalties, she says.

10. Health Insurance for Dependents

“If you’re struggling with loss of income, you may no longer be able to afford $600 being deducted from a paycheck to cover your dependents,” Burkholder says. She suggests checking to see whether you now qualify for a state or federal coverage plan for dependents, such as the Children’s Health Insurance Plan, or coverage by health care providers that may offer reduced prices for basic health care for children.

Deciding what to cut first will be different for every consumer, but whatever the choice, it should be sustainable, rather than a one-time quick fix, Tonini says. Sometimes it’s cutting out the daily $4 coffee, but “they need to figure out what their ‘latte factor’ is.”

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15-minute fixes to raise a credit score

15-minute fixes to raise a credit score

Setting up automatic bill payments can boost your number by as much as 50 points.

Improving your credit score can feel like a gargantuan task. But by spending just 15 minutes, you can give your credit score anywhere from a small bump to a major boost. Here are some tips from credit experts on quick — and sometimes easy — ways to raise your score.

1. Set up automatic bill payment or alerts.

“The one thing you need to do is pay bills on time — that has the biggest impact on your score,” says Carrie Coghill, director of consumer education for FreeScore.com. One way to do that is to set up automatic bill payment through your bank or credit union, at least for the typical minimum amounts of your bills, says Lita Epstein, author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Improving Your Credit Score.” Or, if you’re not comfortable with automatic bill payment, Coghill recommends setting up regular email or text message alerts to remind you of bill due dates. On-time payments over a period of about six months can increase your score by as much as 50 points, says Epstein. “It shows you are getting responsible about your bills.”

2. Pay down revolving debt.

If your credit card debt is more than 35 percent of your credit limit, it’s probably dragging your score down, but paying balances down can provide a quick boost. Experts recommend setting up regular automatic payments to make a dent in your debt or making one big extra payment if you can sell something on Craigslist or eBay or if you get a windfall. “People sometimes get a sizeable tax refund. I recommend using that to pay off debt,” says Doug Borkowski, director of the nonprofit Iowa State University Financial Counseling Clinic. A good rule to follow is this: For every $1,000 of available credit, try to use less than $350, says Clifton O’Neal, a spokesman for TransUnion. “Say you have three cards, each with a $1,000 limit,” O’Neal says. “One has a $500 balance, one has a $350 balance and one has a $250 balance. Pay on all of them, but pay more on the first one to bring it down under 35 percent.”

3. Pay your credit card bill early.

If you use your card for everything from groceries to utilities to a pack of gum to get rewards — but pay in full each month — pay early. Because if you charge, say, $2,000 each month, but pay your bill after you get your statement, it looks as though you’re carrying a large balance when you’re not, Epstein says. “Check when the statement closing date is,” Epstein says. “Making the payment before the statement closing date — just five or six days early — can make a big difference over time. It will be reported to the credit bureaus as a $0 balance and will look like you’re holding less credit.”

4. Ask your credit card company to raise your limit.

If you carry a credit card balance but have been making payments on time and make enough money to support a higher credit limit, a quick phone call to your credit card company could raise your score. A higher credit limit will lower your credit utilization ratio (the amount of available credit you’re using), experts say. However, experts also say it’s important to be honest about whether that step would tempt you to rack up more debt. “It’s about knowing yourself, asking, ‘Am I going to be responsible using that credit card?'” Borkowski says. “Because what if your limit is $4,000 and it gets raised to $8,000 and all you end up with is more credit card debt? But, for those who can handle it, yes, call and try to get your limit raised so you’re at a one-third or less [credit utilization ratio].”

5. Go online to dispute an item on your credit report.

Some experts advise consumers to dispute a possible credit report error by registered mail, and to include evidence. But, let’s face it, many never get around to making copies, hunting down a stamp and heading to the post office. All three major credit bureaus offer the option of filing a dispute online — and it can be faster and easier, experts say. “The first thing to do is pull a copy of your credit report from all three bureaus. You can do it free once a year at AnnualCreditReport.com,” says O’Neal. “Look at each one and see if there’s anything you don’t recognize. If you have any questions about information on your reports, you can file a dispute online. You can track it online, too, so it’s a lot quicker.”

6. Just say no to too many inquiries.

When you’re buying those cool new sunglasses and the cashier asks if you’d like to get a 10 percent discount by signing up for a store credit card, just say no. “Whenever you take new credit, you get a ding on your credit score, so don’t apply for new credit cards all the time,” Epstein says. In fact, she recommends applying for new credit, at most, twice a year.

7. Get a late payment removed from your credit report.

In the “it-can’t-hurt-to-ask” category, it sometimes pays to call a creditor and ask to have a late payment removed from your credit report. “I always say, ‘just ask,'” says Borkowski, who recommends asking for the hardship department whenever you call a credit card company to make such a request. “A lot of times, general customer service might say they can’t help you, but the hardship department — or its equivalent — might,” Borkowski says. “They make a lot of money from the person who misses a payment every now and then but carries a big balance. They like to keep those customers.”

It is often repeated that, when it comes to credit scores, there are no quick fixes. However, if you follow these tips, you could see a big improvement in your credit score — with just a small investment of time.

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Six red flags for your credit report

Six red flags for your credit report

You know bankruptcy and missed payments, but they can be just as bad.

You pay your bills on time and never miss a payment. If you’re still having problems with credit, something on your credit report could scare lenders.

Everyone knows the gremlins that haunt the major credit reports: items such as bankruptcies, foreclosures and payments, late or even missed. Less dramatic items can also cause some anxiety among lenders inconsistent.

When you apply for a loan or a card account, lenders review your credit score and pull your credit report. Or they can take this report and pump through one of their own rating systems.

If they do not like what they see, you may be rejected. Or you can get approved with less favorable conditions. And it’s not just new applicants who have run the gauntlet. Credit card issuers to periodically review the records of existing customers, too.

Even more confusing is that different lenders zero elements of the credit report. So it’s quite possible that even for the same loan, no two lenders will see your credit history, in exactly the same light.

Think there might be something hateful about hiding your credit report? Here are six items that could scare lenders.

1. Multiplying Lines of Credit

Opening a new map is normal. Opening three in a short period of time could signal something bad happens in your financial life.

When it comes to card issuers of credit, “the window auditing has shrunk,” said Norm Magnuson, vice president of public affairs for the Consumer Data Industry Association, the trade association of companies credit. “It used to be months and months. Now, you will find firms that monthly monitoring of account or every two months.”

And the only thing that these issuers do not want to see is that you ask all in town to lend you money.

“It would raise some questions,” he said. “This could be an indicator of something going on. I do not think it’s in the best interest of all consumers to go and be a collector of credit lines.”

2. A short-sale housing

“We told people short sales will not hurt their credit,” says Maxine Sweet, vice president of public education for Experian credit bureau. “But there is no such thing as a” short sale “in terms of how the sale is reported to us.”

“The way the account is closed is that it’s settled for a lesser amount than what you agreed to pay originally,” she said. “Status is” settled “. And it is just as negative as a foreclosure. ”

A tip: negotiating for the lender does not report the difference between your mortgage and what you paid as a “balance due” on your credit report, says John Ulzheimer, formerly of FICO, now president of consumer education for SmartCredit.com. Your credit score will take a heavy blow, but this action will not soften the blow, he said.

Sweet’s advice is not to dismiss the notion of a short sale, just go on with your eyes open.

“This may be the right decision to leave the house,” she said. It can be “better than a foreclosure in the economy, moving from the house and move on with your life. Do not expect to walk away with no impact on your credit history. ”

3. Someone Else’s Debt

Here’s something you might not know: When you co-sign on the dotted line to help someone else get a loan or card, the entire debt is on your credit report.

While the fact that you co-signed is neither good nor bad, it means – to the extent that any potential lenders are concerned – you of the debt yourself. And will be included in your existing debt burden when you apply for a mortgage, credit card or any other form of credit, said Ulzheimer.

And if the person you co-signed stopped paying, paying late or missing payments, that bad behavior is likely to go on your credit report.

So when someone tells you that co-signature is painless, because you never have to part with a penny, you can tell them that this is not true. Co-signing means accepting not only to repay the obligation, if necessary, but also to allow the debt – and all non-payment – as against you the next time you apply for credit you same.

Co-signing for a friend or family member “plays well with the Thanksgiving table, but it does not play well in the underwriting office,” said Ulzheimer.

4. Minimum Payments

If creditors make money when you carry a balance, the lenders who view your credit report does not like to see you pay just the minimum.

“It suggests that you are experiencing financial stress,” says Nessa Feddes, vice president and senior advisor for the American Bankers Association. “You can be delinquent,” she said.

Pay the minimums from time to time does not necessarily signal a problem, she said. For example, minimum pay in January, after holiday spending. Minimum one month or pay you expect your annual premium to reach.

But always pay the minimum after months months signals that you can not pay the full balance, and your current and future lenders will see that as a red giant “stop” sign when it comes to grant additional credit.

5. A Lot of Inquiries

This is similar to hiring a large number of new loans. When tightened lending standards, many borrowers, subprime borrowers in particular, had trouble getting credit, said Sweet. This meant they had to be applied several times to try to get what they wanted.

And with the VantageScore at least, that “really influenced the impact of investigations – they are more important than they used to be,” she said.

With the FICO score, the impact of investigations has remained about the same, according to Ulzheimer. Every time you allow a potential lender to pull your credit report, your score can take a small hit. The exact impact varies with the consumer, the score and the number of inquiries.

And if you apply for a mortgage, auto or student, you can minimize the damage by all applications within two weeks. When you do this, the beam score of all similar investigations and treats them as such. Unfortunately, there is no grace period for applications like credit card.

6. Cash Advances

“Cash advances, in many cases, provide the despair,” says Ulzheimer. “Either you have lost your job or are underemployed. Nobody comes out cash advances against a credit card because they want the money sitting in a bank somewhere.”

Because the interest rate is usually higher than the cost of credit card “, you are usually borrow from Peter to pay Paul,” he said.

How it hurts: first, the cash advance is immediately added to the balance of your debt, which lowers your available credit and can lower your credit score, says Ulzheimer. And all potential lenders will see your score.

Second, card issuers more regularly re-evaluate the behavior of their customers. To do this, they often get the credit report, the FICO score and history of the customer’s account and put these three ingredients through their own rating systems, said Ulzheimer. Many scoring models penalize for cash advances, which are often considered risky, he said. From your account history is only available to the issuer, only your behavior score with this card is likely to be affected, he said.

However, if the issuer slices of your line of credit or cancel your account, which could affect your credit score. And that could affect your relationship with other lenders.

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Most annoying fees on credit cards

Most annoying fees on credit cards

There seems to be little logic to why some companies tack on nuisance charges.

Fees for this, fees for that — even a fee for paying a fee. Where does it end? I’m afraid I know the answer. In this tough economy, businesses of all types are trying to nickel and dime us with add-on charges. They want you to believe these fees are necessary to cover the cost of doing business, but more often than not, they simply mislead the consumer by adding a hidden mark-up to the advertised price.

Sometimes the fees are small, but other times they can be severe. The mortgage loan industry has been doing this forever, but now the practice has spread like the plague to many other services. I can’t be the only person who is outraged by this continuing practice. Or am I?

Here are eight classic fees that really gnaw at me. Some of them I do a pretty good job of avoiding. Others, not so much …

1. Unlisted Phone Number Fees

This is arguably the granddaddy of them all. I currently get charged $1.75 per month for my unlisted telephone number — $21 per year. Why does it cost the phone company more to keep my number out of the phone book than in it? That’s a rhetorical question, but I’ll answer it anyway: It doesn’t.

2. Convenience Fees

I recently bought four tickets online from Ticketmaster so I could take the wife and kids to see the Harlem Globetrotters. Cost: $300 for the set. But on top of that was a “convenience charge” of $5 per ticket that added $20 to my bill. Usually, buying online saves a company money that they’d otherwise spend on a telephone operator or a store clerk. So why am I being charged to make Ticketmaster’s existence more convenient?

3. Fees for Printing Tickets

I’m not done with Ticketmaster. After gagging on the $20 “convenience” charge for my Globetrotter tickets, Ticketmaster wanted to charge me $2.50 so that I could print the tickets from my home printer. Keep in mind that I also had the option to get the tickets via the postal service — for no charge. Where’s the logic in that? How much do you think it costs Ticketmaster to print the tickets on heavier stock paper, using their ticket machines, and then pay their staff to place the tickets in envelopes with the proper postage and mail it to my house? I don’t know either, but I made sure that’s exactly what Ticketmaster did.

4. Hotel Safe Fees

There are more than a few hotels out there that charge you just for the privilege of using their in-room safes — whether you use it or not. Here’s one hotel that charges $1.69 per night. What a joke. Whenever I see this fee, I ask to have it waived.

5. Tax e-Filing Fees

Among the most egregious fees out there are the ones that charge money for essentially doing nothing more than making a mouse click or pushing a couple of keys on a computer keyboard. How much money does it cost to send some bits of information through the Internet? Well, if you ask TurboTax, it’s $36.95. That’s what they charge to e-file a state tax return. So rather than printing out the return and sending it through the mail, I clenched my teeth and reluctantly paid it. Hey, if you paid attention you’ll find a lesson on opportunity cost buried in there.

6. Tax Refund Fees

After spending four hours doing my taxes with the online edition of TurboTax, I was due a refund. “Perfect!” I thought, “I’ll have TurboTax simply deduct what I owe them directly from my refund.” Unfortunately, it turns out TurboTax charges an additional $29.95 if you choose to go that route. My only other option was to pay by credit card — at no charge. How does that make any sense? So I paid with plastic. I hope TurboTax had to pay the credit card company an interchange fee for me using it too. Dummies.

7. Mortgage Junk Fees

There are dozens of mortgage junk fees out there, some more dubious than others, that make you scratch your head and ask what the heck is that for? Re-conveyance verification fees, commitment fees, and the infamous “warehouse fee” are just three classic examples.

8. And Then There’s This

It’s bad enough that airlines almost universally charge fees to people who have the audacity to travel with luggage. But a while back, United, US Airways, and Delta took things a step further by charging their “valued” customers who chose to pay for their bags at the airport, rather than online, an additional fee of between $2 and $3 per bag.

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How to build a credit score from scratch

How to build a credit score from scratch

These measures help young adults to prove they are accountable to the owners and lenders.

When it is time for a student to start building their credit profile? The answer is simple: when ready. You will know by how they budget their money, track expenses and manage their checking or savings and debit cards.

Building good credit is a function of managing your bills responsibly. No teenager or young adult should be in bulk with a credit card or given responsibility for a car loan until they have proven they can manage their cash flow. This means they must show that can deal with obligations without constantly ask the Bank of Dad for more money.

Your child may be ready to manage credit as a rookie, especially if you are willing to look over his shoulder. I prefer to send children to college with pre-paid housing, a checking account and debit card related that does not allow overdrafts. In this way, they have no large monthly bills and can get used to the convenience of plastic without much threat dinging their credit profile.

On the other hand, this approach does little to build good credit. Debit cards and checking accounts do not count for much in the context of the major credit bureaus. Therefore each student must take specific steps to start building a good credit profile. In the real world you want and need from a potential employer or the owner or the car dealer who sees your credit report to see that you are reliable.

Contrary to what many people believe, you do not start adult life with a higher credit score falls as you embezzlement debt. You start with a score around 600 (highest score is 850) and must build through a history of timely repayment of borrowed money.

My oldest daughter is entering her final year at university and for us it’s time to start working on their credit score. After an overview of Erik Larson, founder of NextAdvisor, a financial comparison site oriented, here’s how we approach it:

• Get a credit card. This is by far the quickest and most effective way to begin a credit profile. If I did not think my daughter was ready, I would find a prepaid card or warranty that the reports for the watchdogs of credit (it will say on the application, or just ask). Because she is ready, we’ll choose from credit cards are best suited for students.

• Use credit cards wisely. A credit card opens all sorts of ways to damage your score. Never miss a payment. Pay in full if you can. If you must carry a balance that will not hurt you unless your balance is relatively large. Never charge more than 30% of your credit limit and preferably keep it close to 10%. And do not apply for more than one card at a time or with any frequency.

• Get another form of credit. Having different types of debt helps your score. Thus, a car loan or personal loan or other installment credit can help. It can even help to have a second type, but different card, like a gas card or card store. In some cases, buy furniture or appliances can help conditions monthly. But you have to ask the finance company if they report to credit bureaus.

• Pay all bills on time. If you live off campus, to pay the cable bill or electricity bill or the monthly fee for a new office or on television is a must. It will not do much to build your score. But if you relax and get referred to a collection company is a major ding on your score.

• Do not close unused card account. It’s against-intuitive. Canceling a card can lower your score, because it leaves you with less credit overall, and instantly raises the percentage of the debt capacity you use. A long credit history is part of what makes for a high credit score. So keep those old accounts and ensure that they are in order.

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How to fight errors in your credit report

How to fight errors in your credit report

A well-designed dispute letter can help prevent rejection, the next time you apply for credit.

You’ve probably heard of “sticker shock”, but what about the shock of rejection of credit? This can happen when you apply for a new line of credit – a credit card airline miles new, or maybe even a mortgage – only to find yourself rejected for reasons you can not understand. Worse, when you get a good look at your credit report, you will find that you have entered do not even recognize, let alone agree with.

How do you fix something that was listed on your permanent record by one (or all) of these credit bureaus huge? Does this mean your credit is forever doomed? For starters, there is no need to panic, or anger. Unfortunately the errors on credit reports are not so rare. And even if it’s a pain in the neck, there are steps you can take to rectify the situation. This is the most important to be persistent, and document the process.

Know What You’re Up Against

Get a copy of your credit report from all three major agencies. You can do so online or by phone each of the major services: TransUnion, Equifax and Experian. Each credit report is divided into several sections, including a section covering personal information, requests for credit reports, accounts in good standing, elements of credit and potentially negative elements.

Analyze each of the three reports thoroughly and determine the accuracy of all information they contain. Much of what is on the report should be known to you as a loan you out, what you are looking for is errors. Make a list of all the elements that you feel doubtful or negative errors. (Also note the differences between the three credit reports). This will give you a start on solving problems and potentially improve your credit rating.

Documents and Disputes

If you find errors on your actual report, there are several steps that must be taken to resolve them. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the credit reporting agencies are responsible to correct inaccuracies and incomplete information on credit reports. This allows you the freedom (and responsibility) to contact the reporting agencies, which publish documents, to correct any inaccuracies you find.
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The dangers of using a debit card

The dangers of using a debit card

Consumers should be especially vigilant during the holiday season because identity thieves out en masse. Therefore it is essential that consumers keep their debit cards on the ice, “said Beth Givens, director of the Human Rights Chamber of privacy and exchange one of the foremost experts on the nation Protecting your private information confidential.

What makes debit cards so dangerous? Givens has so many reasons, his organization has developed a comprehensive information sheet if you must use cash, credit or debit card when you shop. (The report also explains the failure of gift cards.)

Here is the short version of the dangers of speed:

1. Limit Losses

Like credit cards, federal law limits your liability for fraudulent transactions on a debit card at $ 50. But only if you notify your financial institution within two days of discovery of theft. If you are a cadet of the space and do not check your bank statements for a couple of months, you could lose everything.

2. Pay Now / Reimburse Later

If someone has fraudulently used your credit card, you do not pay the fee. But when someone has fraudulently used your debit card, money is deducted directly from your account in real time. That means you’re out of money while the bank does have a quiet examination of their records to assess your application fraud. Many consumers complained to the Privacy Rights Clearing House have said they have lost access to their funds for several weeks. In the meantime, they have been caught short and unable to pay their bills, Givens said.

3. Merchant Disputes

The same problem affects merchant disputes. If you pay with a credit card when ordering something online, and that the product is damaged, broken or not at all, you can dispute the charge and stop payment by credit card. If you used your debit card, fees are paid when you order. When you find the goods were not what was announced, the merchant has your money and you are in the unenviable position of having to fight to get your money.

4. Phantom Expenses

If you use a credit card in a hotel, the hotel makes an impression when you register, but do not charge your card until you visit. It is a very different story with a debit card. Generally, the hotels put on hold “on funds in your account for more than you spend. Yes, more. They hold the entire amount of your stay, plus an estimated amount for “false”, such as meals at the hotel restaurant and diving into the mini-bar. This is not a real charge, the hold comes off your account at the end of your stay. But it affects the available balance in your checking account anyway and can lead to overdrafts. One consumer said that these accusations phantom cost him $ 140 in overdraft fees. These takeovers are usually placed on transactions made by debit card at hotels, service stations and car rental companies.

5. Overdrafts, Overdraft and Most Found

Overdraft charges have soared in recent years and the vast majority of consumers who pay to explain their discovery is the result of a transaction by debit card. Many consumers naively that if they have insufficient funds in their accounts, their bank would not approve a slip flow. But they were wrong. The result: a $ 4 coffee could trigger an overdraft fee of $ 35. Government regulators are reigning in these costs by requiring banks to give consumers the opportunity to “opt out” of overdraft protection automatically, but that does not begin to existing accounts until August. (If you have a new account, it starts in July.)

6. Skimming

Financial scammers have obtained sophisticated in recent years and that you use “skimming” machines to read your card information and charge your account, “said Givens. When your debit card is skimmed, your bank account can be drained before you know you’ve done.

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5 common credit card habits that cost you

5 common credit card habits that cost you

Most of us are guilty of some bad habits in our lives. There are too eat the fun stuff, and not exercising enough to burn, and tomorrow, salary expenses today. Of course, able to obtain and maintain a budget can be difficult to follow patterns, but avoiding these five common bad habits can add a bit of easy money to your bottom line.

1. By paying only the minimum balance. Paying just the minimum balance on your credit card each month to keep your creditors happy, but not to help you pay the interest costs more.

Corporate credit card to highlight the love Minimum Payment Due on your monthly bill – a trick they use to stretch your payments for years, costing you hundreds, even thousands of dollars in interest . For example, a $ 5,000 balance with a minimum monthly payment of 4 percent and an APR of 18 percent will take you a little over 11 years to repay, costs about $ 2,875 in total interest paid.

Do not believe? Discover what the credit card calculator to a good start today and see the real cost of paying only the minimum. The results are shocking, and you can rethink your habits minimum payment because it can cost you thousands.

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