London Fashion Week opens catwalk shows to the public

London Fashion Week opens catwalk shows to the public

The British Fashion Council has announced 4 designers set to show their collections to the public during London Fashion Weekend.

Fashion week may once have been an industry insiders only event but thanks largely to the influence of the internet, social media and a band of very popular bloggers or social influencers – everyone wants to get involved.

Sadly almost all fashion week shows have an invite-only policy that restricts the guestlist to fashion press, buyers and other industry figures. So unless you have the required skills to slip past a burly bouncer unnoticed, you’ll be left out in the cold (or tuning in online for the live stream).

Recent seasons have seen some moves towards the democratisation of fashion shows, most notably last year which saw Givenchy’s New York spring/summer 2016 show open its doors with some tickets made available to the public. And now it seems London Fashion Week will be following in its footsteps.

The BFC yesterday announced that London Fashion Weekend (the consumer-event that follows London Fashion Week) will this season see designers present their collections to the public.

Mary Katrantzou, Emilia Wickstead, Holly Fulton and Temperley London are the names announced so far who will be hosting catwalk shows at the 4 day long event which will be held this year at the Saatchi Gallery.

Whilst catwalk shows are not new to the event – the usual format is trend presentations featuring a variety of brands – this season’s offering however, will allow visitors to get an authentic fashion-insider experience with an in-depth look at the participating designer’s collections.

In addition the BFC have also announced a series of talks which will be held over the weekend hosted by an array of industry figures from designers Nicholas Kirkwood and Charlotte Dellal to Premier Models founder Carole White.

There will of course also be the usual shopping opportunities that London Fashion Weekend has become famous for.

Happy 4th of July! Celebrate America’s Birthday

Happy 4th of July! Celebrate America's Birthday

Independence Day also known as 4th of July is the birthday of the United States of America. It is celebrated on July 4th each year in the United States. It is the anniversary of the day on which the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress – July 4, 1776. The day they announced to the world that the 13 colonies no longer belonged to Great Britain. Independence Day was first observed in Philadelphia on July 8, 1776.

On July 4, 1777, the night sky of Philadelphia lit up with the blaze of bonfires. Candles illuminated the windows of houses and public buildings. Church bells rang out load, and cannons were shot from ships breaking the silence. The city was celebrating the first anniversary of the founding of the United States.

The Fourth of July soon became the main patriotic holiday of the entire country. Veterans of the Revolutionary War made a tradition of gathering on the Fourth to remember their victory. In towns and cities, the American flag flew; shops displayed red, white, and blue decorations; and people marched in parades that were followed by public readings of the Declaration of Independence. In 1941, Congress declared July 4 a federal legal holiday.

10 Things Not to Buy During the Holidays

10 Things Not to Buy During the Holidays

Is there a new television, tool or bicycle on your holiday shopping list? Hold on there. While you can find many great deals during November and December, you’re better off making some purchases at other times of the year. Here are 10 items that are even cheaper before or after the holidays.

Televisions

Prices have plummeted over the past seven years for some amazing flat-screens and big-screens. But if you really want to give that special someone the gift of HDTV, you might want to wait until February. Retailers will start lowering prices on last year’s models before new models start hitting the stores in March. The best deals follow the Super Bowl in early February. You could save a few hundred dollars.

Linens

Wait for “white sales” in January before buying sheets, blankets, towels and more. The tradition of department stores discounting linens in January started back in the 19th century. Now, even some catalog retailers follow suit, offering deals in their issues that come out at the beginning of the year. Look for discounts ranging from 10% to 60%.

Tools

Dad always has a list of fix-it projects to tackle around the house, but the holidays aren’t the best time to score deals on new tools. Consider giving tools as a gift for Father’s Day in June — when prices will fall by 25% — instead of Christmas. Frugal Dad will be happy you saved the cash.

Snow Blowers

The Winter Solstice is the worst time to buy a snow blower. In cold, wet climates, March is the month for purchasing this big-ticket item, says Mark Di Vincenzo, author of Buy Ketchup in May and Fly at Noon: A Guide to the Best Time to Buy This, Do That and Go There. You might really appreciate a back-saving snow blower before winter’s heaviest storms arrive, but you’ll appreciate even more the 30% to 40% savings you’ll find as winter ends.

Cameras

Sure, it would be nice to give your spouse a new camera to take pictures of the kids throughout the holiday season. But you might want to wait until February for a better deal. The biggest electronic trade shows of the year happen in January and February, when new models are revealed. By late February, older models are being sold at discounts of 30% or more. Look for Presidents’ Day to be an especially good day to shop for sales.

10 Things Not to Buy During the Holidays

Outerwear

February and March are the ideal months to pick up winter outerwear, such as coats, hats and gloves. Retailers realize that most people have already bought their winter clothing by then, so you can take advantage of discounting to fill your closet for winters ahead.

Furniture

Maybe you want to impress visiting relatives over the holidays by sprucing up your living room. But hold off on buying that new sofa. New furniture inventory hits showrooms in February, so look to save 10% to 50% if you buy in January, as retailers push to clear the showroom. Old models tend to be just as good, using the exact same frames as the new.

Cars

Forget the notion of a car in the driveway on Christmas morning. Instead, think New Year’s Eve (during business hours, of course) to get the best deal. Car dealers want to clear their inventory before the end of the year. TrueCar, which collects automobile data, estimates prices on all vehicles nationwide will average 9.3% below sticker price on December 31 — the steepest discount of the month.

Looking for a used car? Hold off until April for the best deals because it’s the month that dealers tend to buy the most at auction, giving you the best selection.

Cruises

The cold weather creeping up may spark thoughts of escaping to far-off, warm destinations. For those who want to hit the seas, though, booking a cruise is best after the holidays. Wait until “wave season,” which is January to March, to book a summer cruise, says Jaime Freedman, of TravelZoo. You’ll be met with an onslaught of deals as cruise lines compete with one another for customers. Rising airfare prices have made cruises increasingly enticing with their all-inclusive pricing, says Freedman.

Bicycles

As the riding season winds down for most people, you may think that bicycles are ripe for discounts. And you’re right, if you just wait a little longer, until after the holiday season. After the holiday rush, discounts are steep on older models. Shops are also more likely to throw in a few extra free accessories because they are looking for business during the slow winter months. Better yet, fewer customers means you’ll get more personal service.

Pope: Many are missing the Christmas’s simple message

Pope: Many are missing the Christmas's simple message

Pope Benedict XVI decried the increasing commercialization of Christmas as he celebrated Christmas Eve Mass on Saturday night, urging the faithful to look beyond the holiday’s “superficial glitter” to discover its true meaning.

Benedict presided over the service in a packed St. Peter’s Basilica, kicking off an intense two weeks of Christmas-related public appearances that will test the 84-year-old pontiff’s stamina amid signs that fatigue is starting to slow him down.

The Christmas Eve Mass was moved up to 10 p.m. from midnight several years ago to spare the pope a late night that is followed by an important Christmas Day speech. In a new concession this year, Benedict processed down the basilica’s central aisle on a moving platform to spare him the long walk.

Benedict appeared tired by the end of the Mass and a dry cough interrupted his homily. In his homily, Benedict lamented that Christmas has become an increasingly commercial celebration that obscures the simplicity of the message of Christ’s birth.

“Let us ask the Lord to help us see through the superficial glitter of this season, and to discover behind it the child in the stable in Bethlehem, so as to find true joy and true light,” he said.

It was the second time in as many days that Benedict has pointed to the need to rediscover faith to confront the problems facing the world today. In his end-of-year meeting with Vatican officials on Thursday, Benedict said Europe’s financial crisis was largely “based on the ethical crisis looming over the Old Continent.”

Benedict officially kicked off Christmas a few hours before the evening Mass, lighting a candle in his studio window overlooking St. Peter’s Square in a sign of peace, as crowds gathered to witness the unveiling of the Vatican’s larger-than-life sized nativity scene.

Security was tight for the evening Mass, as it has been in recent years. There were no repeats of the 2008 and 2009 Christmas Eve security breaches, in which a woman with a history of psychiatric problems and wearing a telltale red sweat shirt jumped the wooden security barrier along the basilica’s central aisle and lunged for the pope.

In 2008, the pope’s security detail blocked her from getting to Benedict. But in 2009, she managed to grab Benedict’s vestments and pulled him to the ground. The pope was unhurt and continued along with the service, but a French cardinal who was nearby fell and broke his hip.

On Sunday, Benedict will deliver his traditional “Urbi et Orbi” speech, Latin for “to the city and the world,” from the central loggia of St. Peter’s overlooking the piazza. Usually, the speech is a survey of sorts of the hardships and wars confronting humanity. He’s also due to deliver Christmas greetings in dozens of languages.

Next weekend, he’ll preside over a New Year’s Eve vespers service, followed by a New Year’s Day Mass. A few days later he’ll celebrate Epiphany Mass followed by his traditional baptizing of babies in the Vatican’s frescoed Sistine Chapel.

Black Friday becomes Black Week this year

Black Friday becomes Black Week this year

Retailers have turned the one-day bonanza into a week’s worth of hot sales.

…There may be just one Black Friday — the day after Thanksgiving — but retailers are offering deals pretty much every day this week. “It’s become Black Friday Week,” says Deborah Mitchell, executive director for the Center of Brand and Product Management at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Like Super Bowl Sunday, the main event is later in the week, but everyone is gearing up and excited now.” Not all the best discounts, however, are saved for the big day, and shoppers who stick to Black Friday may find they’ve missed out, she says. “Smart shoppers will be looking every day.”

The wider spread of sales throughout the week, both before and after Black Friday, has another advantage for shoppers. While stores typically suspend their price matching policies on Black Friday, most will meet a competitor’s advertised deal on other days this week. They may also offer a credit on an item recently purchased for the difference between the purchased price and new sale price, says Edgar Dworsky.

But there’s a catch, say retail experts. Many of the deals are blink-and-you’ll-miss-them opportunities which are available for a few hours, or until a limited supply runs out. Here’s what to look for each day now through Cyber Monday:

Tuesday

Many stores have already kicked off their Black Friday countdowns, offering one-day deals that come close to — or in some cases beat — their Friday prices, Mitchell says. Best Buy, for example, had a 55″ LG LED HDTV Monday for $898, a 31% discount and $100 cheaper than a planned Samsung door-buster for Black Friday of comparable quality. Amazon.com launched its Black Friday deals site Nov. 1, and has new offers each day this week. A number of stores, including Lowe’s and Home Depot, are promising that Black Friday prices are already in effect, Dworsky says.

Wednesday

Big pre-Black Friday sales, including those from Newegg.com and Target wrap up on Wednesday. Shoppers also may benefit from waiting until midnight, when many Thanksgiving online-only deals could go into effect, Dworsky says. Since most retailers have specified turkey-day deals, but haven’t offered details on availability, it may only be worth it if you’re already up late making the pies. “Last I checked, Nov. 24 still had 24 hours in it, so you could wait up for nothing,” he says.

Thursday

Shoppers stuffing the turkey at 6 a.m. may find their time waiting for the bird to roast well spent shopping. Kmart will be open from 6 a.m. until 9 p.m., and Best Buy plans to release a number of online-only sales that day. Gap Inc. plans to open 1,000 stores — including 800 Old Navy stores and a number of Gap and Banana Republic outlet stores — for limited hours on Thanksgiving. “We know from the receptiveness of Thanksgiving hours over the past two years that many consumers want the ability to jump-start their holiday shopping,” says Louise Callagy, a spokeswoman for Gap. She says Old Navy will offer 3D glasses for shoppers to spy hidden games, messages and extra discounts around the store.

On the later side, Toys R Us will open its doors for Black Friday at 9 p.m. on Thanksgiving, followed an hour later by Walmart. But leaving in time to get in line may require cutting Thanksgiving celebrations short. Mitchell suggests double-checking the ads to see which in-store-only deals (if any) are worth ditching the family.

Black Friday

More deals are rolling in at midnight this year, with retailers including Kohl’s, Target, Best Buy and Macy’s pushing forward the usual 5 a.m. store openings. Online shoppers will find plenty of deals at that time, too, with online-only deals and some of the same door-busters that are available in stores, says Andrew Eisner, the director of content for Retrevo.com. Despite waning interest from consumers, Black Friday is still one of the best days of the year to get bargains, he says. Anticipated deals include a $200 42″ Sharp LCD HDTV at Best Buy, and a $350 HP laptop at Office Depot. But shoppers must also contend with very limited quantities of those deeply discounted items, as well as some misleading sales on older items that aren’t the latest technology, Eisner says. Many of the sale Blu-ray players, for example, require shoppers to buy an extra WiFi adaptor, while laptops tend to have older, slower processors.

Shoppers have added incentive to keep their mobile phone on hand this year. Stores including Bon Ton, Macy’s and JC Penney have said they plan to have more mobile coupons available. Toys R Us announced last week that it will offer shoppers who check in on Foursquare special “swarm” deals including $50 off the $170 Imaginarium City train table and 40% off the Incredible Edibles toy line.

Saturday

Big-box stores will continue some of the same sales they offered on Friday, with a different round of door-busters. Given limited inventory this year, shoppers shouldn’t count on these items being in stock, says Dworsky. You may find deals on items that are less likely to sell out. Sears, for example, has a door-buster of 30% off Kenmore Elite appliances until 1 p.m. on Saturday as well as $200 off a broad range of Craftsman tool sets.

It may be worth browsing mom-and-pop shops, too. Many are participating in American Express’s “Small Business Saturday.” The card company is offering a $25 credit to shoppers who register their card and spend $25 at a small business that day. Plus, many stores are offering their own deals, including 20% off at McNally Jackson Books in New York and up to 25% off designer denim at AB Fits in San Francisco.

Sunday

Savvy shoppers should check out eBay in the early morning hours, says Tim Dubroy, a spokesman for eBay market data firm Terapeak. “We noticed a couple of years ago that sales are higher on the Sunday after Thanksgiving than on the Monday after,” he says. eBay sellers scanning Cyber Monday ads often price their items competitively. Last year, for example, a Dell Zino HD desktop sold for an average $340 on eBay on Sunday — $9 less than the Dell.com Cyber Monday price that several gadget blogs touted. Sellers also matched a $399 Amazon.com deal for a Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1 digital camera. For the best deals, bid or buy before 2 p.m. Eastern, when prices rise as more shoppers head online, Dubroy suggests.

Monday

“There’s been so little talk of Cyber Monday this year that you have to wonder if it even exists,” Dworsky says. The National Retail Federation reports that 45% of retailers plan to offer a coupon or percentage-off sale, about 38% will have a limited-time promotion and 30% will offer free shipping on some orders. (In comparison, last year 49% had special offers, 41% offered one-day sales and 22% had free shipping on all purchases.) Still, it’s worth browsing the sales, if not necessarily waiting for them, he says. AT&T plans to offer several smartphones — including the HTC Inspire and the LG Thrill — for a penny when consumers sign a two-year contract, similar to a deal Amazon.com has scheduled for Black Friday weekend. Clothing chain Express offers 30% off all online purchases plus free shipping, which is 10% less than its Thanksgiving and Black Friday morning in-store offers.

The meaning of Memorial Day

The meaning of Memorial Day

The tradition of gracing headstones with American flags grew from the holiday’s origin.

Officially, Memorial Day, observed on the last Monday of May (this year it’s May 30), honors the war dead. Unofficially, the day honors the start of summer.

The upcoming three-day weekend has prompted searches on Yahoo! for “when is memorial day,” “what is memorial day,” and “memorial day history.” The day was originally known as “Decoration Day” because the day was dedicated to the Civil War dead, when mourners would decorate gravesites as a remembrance.

The holiday was first widely observed on May 30, 1868, when 5,000 people helped decorate the gravesites of 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried at Arlington National Cemetery. (Some parts of the South still remember members of the Confederate Army with Confederate Memorial Day.)

After World War I, the observances were widened to honor the fallen from all American wars–and in 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day a national holiday.

Towns across the country now honor military personnel with services, parades, and fireworks. A national moment of remembrance takes place at 3 p.m. At Arlington National Cemetery, headstones are graced with small American flags.

This day is not to be confused with Veterans Day, which is observed on November 11 to honor military veterans, both alive and dead.

However, confusion abounds anyway, with the weekend marking for many the kickoff of summer, and it is reserved for weekend getaways, picnics, and sales. Searches on “memorial day sales,” “memorial day recipes,” and “memorial day weekend” are just some of the lookups related to the festivities.

How to not mess up Valentine’s Day

How to not mess up Valentine's Day

Navigating the holiday can be tricky, whether you’re newly dating or a longtime couple.

Surveys show that 36 million couples exchanging boxes of chocolates and 189 million roses for Valentine’s Day. But when you’re in a new relationship, chocolates and roses are not always the right gift to give. “Valentine’s Day means different things to different people,” says Toni Coleman, a licensed clinical social worker in founding McLean, VA and www.consumer-mate.com, a relationship advice site. “Doing too much or too little when the other person does not feel the same way 14 could cause problems in a new relationship in February.”

If you do not know how to handle Valentine’s Day gift and dating etiquette, read on for tips for when you just meet someone, when you’ve been together for a few months and when you’re in a committed relationship.

When you just meet someone

Day Planning: It is unrealistic to expect a huge party at this stage of romantic part. “If you had a date or two is OK for one to say, ‘Hey, Valentine’s Day is coming, and even though we’ve only released a few times, I thought it would be fun to do something together, like go see a movie. “If the other person wants to do that, that’s fine,” says Coleman. However, if the other person and conjunctiva hems, you should go back and fix a date for another day. It could be something as simple as that person has already made plans, or maybe the other person is not ready to be with someone on Valentine’s Day since the day comes with a lot expectations.

Get a gift: What if you two do together that day – should bring a gift? “It’s good to give a little something,” said Coleman. For example, if you know your date of collection of things with pigs on them, giving him a pig fridge magnet says: “I am careful with what you love.” Similarly, if a guy said he loves reading novels by Stephen King, the last pick for him is nice, not a profession huge eternal love. Remember that you should never give a gift with the hope of receiving one in return. Be prepared for the fact that the other person may not have thought of you doing something, and make sure you can handle before you offer your gift.

Read more “How to not mess up Valentine’s Day”

Where did Christmas tree tradition begin?

Where did Christmas tree tradition begin?

Its roots can be traced back 1,300 years, but the custom didn’t take hold until much later.

The origin of the Christmas tree is obscured by the uncertainties of oral history from pre-literacy European cultures. For example, according to Christian tradition, the Christmas tree is associated with St. Boniface and the German town of Geismar. Sometimes in the life of St. Boniface (c. 672-754), he cut down the tree of Thor to refute the legitimacy of the Norse gods at the local German tribe. St. Boniface saw a tree growing in the roots of old oak. Taking this as a sign of Christian faith, he said: “…that Christ is the center of your family… “using the tree as a symbol of Christianity.

The tradition of the Christmas tree as it is known today is relatively young. It was created by Martin Luther Protestant counterpart of the scene of the Nativity Catholic. Luther made the Christmas tree as a symbol of the Tree of Life in the Garden of Eden.

The custom of erecting a Christmas tree can be traced historically to the 15th century Livonia (now Estonia and Latvia) and the 16th century in northern Germany. According to the first documented use of a Christmas tree in Estonia, in 1441, 1442, and 1514 the Brotherhood of Blackheads erected a tree for the holidays in their fraternity house at Reval (now Tallinn). During the last night of celebrations leading up to holidays, the tree was taken at the Town Hall Square where members of the Brotherhood have danced around him.

In 1584, the pastor and columnist Balthasar Russow wrote a well-established tradition of creating a spruce tree decorated in the market place where young people “went with a flock of young girls and women, first sung and danced there and then set fire tree. ” In this period, the guilds started erecting Christmas trees in front of their guild houses: Ingeborg Weber-Kellermann (Marburg professor of European ethnology) found a Bremen guild chronicle of 1570, which tells how a small tree was decorated with apples, walnuts, dates, pretzels and paper flowers “and erected in the guild-house, the Children Guild members, who collected the goodies on Christmas Day.

The Secret of Online Holiday Spending

The Secret of Online Holiday Spending

Now that the holidays have decided to move into the express lane of time and travel towards us at the speed of light, we had better ready ourselves for the 5 S’s of Christmas: 1) selecting; 2) shopping; 3) savings; 4) spending; and 5) Santa. For the next 5 weeks we will be looking at one of these S’s. This week we will begin with Spending.

There are many different methods of spending for those “must have” gifts that your loved ones have been drooling over for so long. Many years ago there were only two methods of having the money to buy the desired present. First, the method of choice for most “over 70” crowd, is called “savings”. Second, a method that is used many times with “savings” is the “buying only what you can afford”. These two methods are somewhat of a lost art and I personally have only heard about them in books and the reading of ancient artifacts.

One of these historical writings mentions a ritual known as Christmas Club. This amazing tool was used by banks to aid members to set aside a certain amount, on a weekly or bi-monthly basis, to help them have money for Christmas. It was like a reversed credit card, with the payments being made before the purchases and instead of the patron spending 29% interest each month to make up for the credit card monthly fees, they would receive the interest (yes, the interest would come to them). This in turn would give them more money than they put into their account. As late as 1966, this was determined to be the American way of Christmas spending. That was before credit cards spending for Christmas became as customary as the artificial Christmas trees.

Today, the method of choice by most Americans is just the complete opposite as the first two methods mentioned: put every Christmas item on credit card and “never refuse a child of whatever they want”. (“New $500 game machine? – sure, let me apply for this new credit card!”) If I sound slight fuchsias, it’s because I am still paying off my Christmas shopping debt from 1972.

To get the most out of using this plastic god for holiday cheer there are certain rules and secrets that you need to learn to have a safer, cheaper, happy holiday.

Rule #1- Make sure that you shop only on secure, trusted Internet sites. Ask yourself these questions:

1) Are they a known reliable online company? Are you shopping at Amazon.com or Grannysdiscountbooksandadultsite.com?

2) Do they have a physical address?

3) Is there a method of contacting the business?

4) Is their shopping cart secure? Do not enter your credit card on a site that is not secure. A secure site online is just as secure as using your card at your local Wal-Mart or grocery store.

Secret #1- When Shopping online use your credit card and not your debit card. According to the Federal Trade Commission, Federal law says that you are only liable for $50 if your card is misused.

Rule #2- Pay you bill off each month. Any credit counselor will tell you that this is the best way to manage your money and keep yourself out of financial ruin. If you can’t afford it, don’t buy it.

Secret #2- When using a credit card make your purchases the same day you receive your credit card statement in the mail. This will give you a few extra weeks of non-interest time to save up to pay off your debt.

Rule #3- Don’t save your credit card information on the web site or for that matter on your computer. Even though the web site may be secure there were a few reports last year of hackers getting into different system of online stores. It really doesn’t take that long to re-enter the information.

Secret #3- Pay your credit card online and make your payment at least 2 business days before it is due. This may seem like a contradiction to not saving the credit card information on line but it is not. The credit card information for the lender maintains your credit card information in their secure data base. Once again, it is a similar retrieving system as if you made a purchase at a department store.

Rule #4- Protect your password. Don’t save your password on your computer and don’t use the same password over and over. Keep a written log in a safe convenient place. There have been hackers who have been able to access information from personal computers. Protect yourself.

Secret#4- Use a formula for your password: have a prescribed combination of letters and numbers you use for a common word that you are sure to remember, then a number you use for the site you are at. For example ReginAmaz might be a formula for a password password at Amazon if I used the first 5 letters of my name along with the first 4 letters of the sites name. ReginBarn might be a password for Barnes and Noble.

Secret#5- More secrets on passwords: use numbers in place of letters at times. Use 1 for an i or l, 0 for o and maybe even 9 for g. For example, with the above password for Amazon might be Re91nAmaz.

Secret#6- If the systems are down, don’t ever call your order in. Wait until the systems come back up. If the Internet site is down, it is possible that their computers are down as well. Therefore when calling an order in, depending on the call center, your credit card information may be written down on paper instead of being entered into a secure location.

Secret#7- If you’re in need of extra money and decide to sign up for a new credit card, read the fine print. One of my credit cards recently sent me a letter saying that I qualify for their platinum card. The fine print says that there is a $72 annual fee! Watch out for low interest rates, the companies have to make their money somewhere. These introductory rates may lead to an astronomical rate or exorbitant annual fees.

With these rules and secrets now firmly placed before you, your holiday spending should be safer and wiser. Next week we will look at “Saving”.

Five Thanksgiving myths debunked

Five Thanksgiving myths debunked

Turkey will probably not to blame for making you sleepy after big meals Thursday.

1. Turkey makes you sleepy

If you are falling asleep on the couch after Thanksgiving, do not blame the poor old turkey. While it is true that Turkey contains tryptophan – an amino acid that is a precursor to healing, serotonin welfare – there is not enough tryptophan in turkey to roast you tired. In fact, there are more tryptophan in cheese and chicken breast as it is in Turkey. The real reason you’re asleep? It is likely that the stress of the holidays, the hours spent in the kitchen, wine and spirits – and all the fat and calories you just consumed.

2. Fresh pumpkin is better than canned pumpkin

“Conserve” is not a bad word. Canned tuna and canned tomatoes have a place in the pantry of every chef. The same rule applies to the pumpkin. Canned pumpkin at the grocery store often produces a more reliable and consistent – especially in baking. If you insist on using fresh pumpkin (and, let’s be honest, tell your guests to enjoy the traditional flavors of Thanksgiving) be sure to use sugar pumpkins, the pumpkins you buy for carving at Halloween are watery , mealy and not very good for recipes. But I say live canned pumpkin – at least one day a year.

3. The biggest turkey, the best

When I was a kid, my mother took me to the supermarket a week before Thanksgiving and let me choose the turkey. I went for one with the biggest breasts. Laugh? Here’s the thing, those who have large breasts do not have much flavor. According to Rick Rodgers, cooking teacher and author of Thanksgiving 101, you must compare the size of the chest to the size of the rest of the bird. “Broad-breasted turkeys are new races that were created to produce a greater quantity of meat taste better -. No More the ratio of breast meat chicken whole, turkey is the most original and the oldest – will be shaped his taste, he said. My advice, go with a fresh turkey or heritage turkey crossing.

4. The stuffing is the same as dressing

Dressing and stuffing are similar, but not the same thing. The difference lies in how they are prepared. The joke is, of course, stuffed inside the bird, while dressing is usually cooked in a baking dish. I always preferred to dress as it has more surface area exposed to the oven, which means you get more crisp, crunchy bits. The filling is wet and soggy, in my opinion. But there is another reason you should stop stuffing your bird. Plus my friend Alton Brown for an explanation. “Many things could go there (the cavity of the bird) … in fact, one thing must not: .. Stuffing stuffing is evil farce adds mass, it slows down the cooking is bad because that the more. bird cooks the drier it will be. And since the cavity is an ideal haven for the bacteria salmonella, you must be absolutely certain that the cavity is heated to 165 ° F, which means to cook least part of the bird. … is wrong, “he said. Uh, looks like the joke is not a good idea.

5. Pop-up thermometers in plastic work

It is easy (and I’ll be quick): Pop-up thermometers are not reliable. Not only do they pierce the skin and leave tasty juices escape, but they can also malfunction, leaving you with an under-or overcooked bird. Moreover, most are made to appear at 180 ° F – so your bird is toast. Use a probe thermometer instead.