How to use Twitter when you search for a job

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

If you’re among the millions of people seeking work, there is more of a social networking site that you may have to join Twitter.

Twitter? For the job search? In the history of Kyle Flaherty. He left a job in marketing at Boston determined to find a job in-house public relations. He tweeted about his decision and included a link to her professional blog, where he described the kind of work he sought. A few days later, his tweet was retweeted. In other words, knowledge was passed – to his current boss.

“I do not think I got it if not for Twitter,” said Flaherty, who moved from Boston to Austin, Texas, for the new job with a pregnant woman and a two year old son.

Twitter basics

Twitter, as you probably know, is the social networking site that lets you send tweets – the equivalent of text messages or status updates from Facebook, but limited to 140 characters. You must keep them very short and simple. To register, simply fill out an online profile. Then you can send tweets and view on your computer, cell phone or mobile internet device. Unlike Facebook, you can follow (receive tweets from) someone, there is no formal process of requesting and accepting.

When you register to monitor tweets from someone, they see that you’re next. It’s a good thing, because they may decide to reciprocate and follow you, too, which is something you want if you are a professional trying to get noticed.

“Twitter gives you access to people you might not otherwise meet or encounter,” says Miriam Salpeter, Career Coach and founder of Keppie Careers in Atlanta.

Join the conversation

Needless to say, not everyone has a job simply tweeting on their employment status. But Twitter, like LinkedIn, Facebook, and industry conferences, is a way to reach out and reach out to people who know the hiring managers or you can submit them.

Many people use Twitter to share ramblings blind, like “having a hamburger with friends this afternoon.” But the most clever Twitterers use to comment on events in their professions. Tweets they follow industry leaders and even to establish informal relations following one another.

If you have never used Twitter, do not sign up immediately and furnaces people with a message saying that you are unemployed. Instead, create a slow dynamics. Open an account and include something about your profession in your username. Since users can search by subject tweets is a way to make your feed more visible.

“I automatically follow back anyone who has a job or jobs in their title,” says Salpeter, whose name is keppie_careers Twitter.

In the profile section, add a few lines about what you do professionally – which also contributes to your searchable.

Before start tweeting, research leaders in your industry, the companies you want to work, and any other professional contacts. Follow them. Many companies – including marketing, public relations, and technology – using Twitter to post job offers, and many hiring managers tweet, too.

“You can hear about jobs, an idea for a business to determine how to interact with them and see how you fit in,” Flaherty said.

Make an impression

Then, start tweeting. Give your opinion on the news, industry events, and seminars. If someone is following you, especially a leader in the industry, says something controversial or interesting, retweet (before), or send the person a direct answer. This may be an ideal way to get a conversation, but more personal.

If you are a hiring manager in a company you want to work out what he or she writes and then adapt your tweets to comment on such things.

This is what John Johansen did when he decided he wanted to leave Boston for a more affordable. It targets marketing professionals in Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, and Austin – and began following their tweets. When someone in the media said something very interesting, he replied with a message @ – public comment. This helped him develop relationships with marketing professionals in the cities. In turn, introduced him to others on Twitter.

As he found he had wanted to work for companies, Johansen Twitter search to locate their employees. In this way, he found the head of human resources for Bulldog Solutions, a marketing agency in Austin. “I had been following their ballots and had an interest in working there,” he said. “I learned of their human resources director has been on Twitter, so I contacted her.” They met, she asked her resume – and he was hired.

“Much of the use of Twitter is that it allowed me to break the ice,” said Johansen. “For a job seeker, it is a way of saying:” I can show you that I am a real person, I see you are a real person, and we have a connection. From the employer side, they can see what a person is talking about when they are on Twitter and how they operate outside of work. ”

Johansen has laid off five months after it began, because of the economic slowdown. He jumped back on Twitter and was used to find freelance work.

“There is nothing revolutionary about such things,” said Flaherty. “It is evolutionary. Back in the day, we sent letters a few years later e-mails, and a few years later we have updated our blogs. The beauty of Twitter is that it’s as if you’re on a network if all the time, in real time. “

Landing a job in the publishing industry

Landing a job in the publishing industry

There is no secret how to find a job in the publishing industry like an editor, copywriter or a writer. The truth is landing a job in the publishing industry is like finding a job in any other industry. Preparation and assertiveness are always key ingredients to succeed. There is never a quick fix to a job search so you have spend time, effort and money before you can actually get the job of your dreams.

In order to help you to succeed in landing your publishing industry job, here are some steps that can help you along the way:

Become qualified for the position you desire;
Learn to demonstrate your qualifications;
Research prospective employers;

Call up employers;
Master the interview process;
Follow up after the interview and when things do not work out;
Start over from step 1.

Gap Year Experience: Why more teens are delaying college

Gap Year Experience: Why more teens are delaying college

Taking a year off is catching on with students looking for adventure and to avoid burnout.

This summer, Monika Lutz’s life took an unusual turn. Instead of heading off to college, the high school graduate packed her bags for a Bengali jungle. Lutz, like a growing number of other young Americans, is taking a year off. Gap years are quite common in Britain and Australia, but they are just beginning to catch on in the U.S. Lutz, who grew up in Boulder, Colo., has put together a 14-month schedule that includes helping deliver solar power to impoverished communities in India and interning for a fashion designer in Shanghai – experiences that are worlds away from the stuffy lecture halls and beer-stained frat houses that await many of her peers. “I could not be happier,” she says.

No one tracks the number of U.S. students who decide to take gap years, but many high school guidance counselors and college admissions officers say the option is becoming more popular. Harvard, which has long encouraged its incoming first-years to defer matriculation, has seen a 33% jump in the past decade in the number of students taking gap years. MIT’s deferments have doubled in the past year. And Princeton formalized the trend in 2009 by funding gap-year adventures for 20 incoming first-years annually. The school’s goal is to extend this offer to about 100 students per class.

Meanwhile, a cottage industry of gap-year programs and consultants has sprouted in the U.S. Tom Griffiths, founder of GapYear.com a site that serves as a clearinghouse for gap-year programs, says that five years ago, perhaps 1% of his Web traffic originated in the U.S. Now, that figure is 10%. The number of Americans taking gap years through Projects Abroad, a U.K. company that coordinates volunteer programs around the world, has nearly quadrupled since 2005. The organization just launched Global Gap, its first effort marketed specifically to Americans; the 27-week curriculum features service projects in South Africa, Peru, India and Thailand.

Like a year of college, these adventures can be expensive. The price tag for Global Gap is $30,000. Thinking Beyond Borders, a highly respected, eight-month program that parachutes students into third-world communities, costs $39,000. Yes, it’s certainly possible for students to pursue meaningful volunteer work on a smaller budget. But unless kids stay at home and get a paying job nearby, families will likely incur significant expense. The increase in interest suggests that at least some families are willing. “There are now more structured opportunities for students to take gap years,” says David Hawkins, the director of public policy and research for the National Association for College Admission Counseling. “That doesn’t happen unless there’s a market to sustain it.”

Why are students attracted to the gap-year concept? According to new survey data from Karl Haigler and Rae Nelson, education-policy experts and co-authors of The Gap-Year Advantage, the most common reason cited for deferring college is to avoid burnout. “I felt like I was focused on college as a means to an end,” says Kelsi Morgan, an incoming Middlebury College freshman who spent last year feeding llamas at a North Dakota monastery, interning for a judge in Tulsa, Okla., and teaching English at an orphanage in the Dominican Republic. The hope is that after a year out of the classroom, students will enter college more energized, focused and mature. That can be an advantage for colleges too. Robert Clagett, dean of admissions at Middlebury, did some number-crunching a few years ago and found that a single gap semester was the strongest predictor of academic success at his school.

Most experts recommend securing a spot in college before taking a gap year and warn against using the time off to pad your rÉsumÉ. “Most admissions folks can see right through that,” says Jim Jump, the academic dean of St. Christopher’s School in Richmond, Va. But for students like Lutz, who, after getting rejected from five Ivies, decided to take time off, a gap year can help reprioritize and focus interests. Lutz now plans to apply mostly to non-Ivies that have strong marketing programs. “This experience has really opened my eyes to the opportunities the world has to offer,” she says.

But at least one education expert doesn’t want schools spreading the gap-year message as if it were gospel. In a study that followed 11,000 members of the high school class of 1992 for eight years after graduation, Stefanie DeLuca, a sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University, found that, all things being equal, those who delayed college by a year were 64% less likely to complete a bachelor’s degree than those who enrolled immediately after high school. DeLuca did not pinpoint whether these students voluntarily started college late, but at the very least, her work indicates that taking a gap year doesn’t guarantee success. “I’m not going to say that time off does not have benefits,” says DeLuca. “But I think we should be tempered in our enthusiasm.”

No one’s gap-year enthusiasm was more tempered than Olivia Ragni’s. In the spring of 2009, the high schooler from Arkadelphia, Ark., inadvertently missed the deadline to secure her spot at Rice University that fall and was told she would have to wait a year to enroll. “I was really down,” says Ragni, who still cries when recalling the embarrassment of informing her classmates of the unintended deferment. But through two experiential-learning organizations, she spent the year volunteering in a hospital in India, taking intensive Spanish while hiking volcanoes in Guatemala and working at an elephant camp in Thailand. “I gained confidence and independence,” says Ragni, who has just arrived in Houston to start her first term at Rice. “It was the best experience of my life.” The tears have dried up. Consider it a lucky break.

Tough job-interview questions answered

Tough job-interview questions answered

When telling a prospective employer about yourself, avoid the chronological approach and try this.

For many people, job interviews are the most stressful part of the job-search process. And it’s true that an interview is often a make-or-break moment: If you flub the interview in a big way, you probably won’t make the cut–no matter how good your resum is, or how excellent your qualifications are.

You can combat nerves and increase your chances of success by practicing your answers to difficult interview questions. Here are some of the toughest, with suggested answers:

1. Why do you want to work in this industry?

Bad answer:
“I love to shop. Even as a kid, I spent hours flipping through catalogs.”

Tip:
Don’t just say you like it. Anyone can do that. Focus instead on your history with that particular industry, and if you can, tell a success story.

Good answer:
“I’ve always loved shopping, but my interest in retail marketing really started when I worked at a neighborhood boutique. I knew that our clothes were amazing, but that we weren’t marketing them properly. So I worked with management to come up with a marketing strategy that increased our sales by 25 percent in a year. It was great to be able to contribute positively to an industry I feel so passionate about, and to help promote a product I really believed in.”

2. Tell us about yourself.

Bad answer:
“I graduated four years ago from the University of Michigan, with a bachelor’s in biology–but I decided that wasn’t the right path for me. So I switched gears and got my first job, working in sales for a startup. Then I went on to work in marketing for a law firm. After that, I took a few months off to travel. Finally, I came back and worked in marketing again. And now, here I am, looking for a more challenging marketing role.”

Tip:
Instead of giving a chronological work history, focus on your strengths and how they pertain to the role. If possible, illustrate with examples.

Good answer:
“I’m really energetic, and I’m a great communicator. Working in sales for two years helped me build confidence and taught me the importance of customer loyalty. I’ve also got a track record of success. In my last role, I launched a company newsletter, which helped us build on our existing relationships and create new ones. Because of this, we ended up seeing a revenue increase of 10 percent over two years. I’m also very interested in how companies can use web tools to better market themselves, and would be committed to building on your existing platform.”

3. What do you think of your previous boss?

Bad answer:
“He was completely incompetent, and a nightmare to work with, which is why I’ve moved on.”

Tip:
Remember that if you get the job, many of the people interviewing you will someday be your previous bosses. The last thing they want is to hire someone they know will badmouth them. Instead of trashing your former employer, stay positive, and focus on what you learned from him (no matter how awful he really was).

Good answer:
“My last boss taught me the importance of time management, didn’t pull any punches, and was extremely deadline-driven. His no-nonsense attitude pushed me to work harder, and to meet deadlines I never even thought were possible.”
Read more “Tough job-interview questions answered”

Five mistakes online job hunters make

Five mistakes online job hunters make

In a tight labor market, building and maintaining an online presence is essential for networking and job search.

Done right, it can be an important tool for the present and the future of networking and value to potential employers try to get an idea of who you are, your talents and experience.

Done wrong, it can easily get out of the race for most positions. Here are five mistakes job seekers make online:

1. Forgetting manners

If you use Twitter or you write a blog, you should assume that hiring managers and recruiters to read your updates and messages. In December 2009 a study by Microsoft Corp. revealed that 79% of hiring managers and recruiters review the information online about candidates before making a hiring decision. Of those, 70 said they% rejected candidates based on information they find online. Key reasons listed? Concerns about lifestyle, inappropriate comments, and inappropriate photos and video.

“Everything is indexed and able to search,” says Miriam Salpeter, a job search, Atlanta-based coach and social media. “Even Facebook, which many people consider a more private network, can easily become a trap for job seekers who post things they would not want a prospective boss to see.”

Do not be lulled into thinking your privacy settings are foolproof. “All it takes is one person sharing the information that you might not want to share, send a message, or breach of trust for the illusion of privacy in a closed network of be eliminated, “says Salpeter, who recommends not post anything illegal (even if it’s a joke), criticism of a boss, colleague or client, information about an investigator or anything sexual or discriminatory. “Suppose that your future boss is reading everything that you share online,” she said.

2. Overkill

Inerting social media networks with half-profiles does nothing except to annoy the people you want to correct that impression: potential employees try to find more information about you.

An online profile is very much more effective than many others do not and incomplete, “said Sree Sreenivasan, dean of students at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He decided early to limit to three social networking sites: Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. “It is simply not enough time” he said. “Pick two or three, then cultivate a presence there.”

Many people make the mistake of joining LinkedIn and other social media sites and then just let their public profiles sit unfinished, says Krista Canfield, a spokesman LinkedIn. “Just signing up for an account is not enough,” she said. “At a minimum, make sure you are connected to at least 35 people and make sure your profile is 100 percent. Members with complete profiles are 40 times more likely to receive offers of LinkedIn. ”

LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter are the three most popular social networking sites for human resources managers to use for recruitment, according to a poll released last month by JobVite, a recruitment software company.

3. Not getting the word out

When the accounting firm Dixon Hughes had recently opened a business development manager, Emily Bennington, company director of marketing and development, posted a link to the occasion on his Facebook page. “I immediately received emails deprived of many people in my network, none of them I knew were on the market for a new job, she said. “I understand there are privacy issues when it comes to job search, but if nobody knows you’re looking for is also a problem.”

Change what may be as simple as updating your status on LinkedIn and other social networking site for people to know that you are open to new positions. If you are currently employed and do not want your boss to find out that you need, you will need to be more subtle. One way is to give potential employers a sense of how you might fit in, “said Dan Schawbel, author of” Me 2.0 “and founder of the millennium mark. “I would recommend a placement, or the personal brand statement which describes who you are, what you do, and what audience you serve, so people an idea of how you can benefit their business.”

4. Quantity over quality

Choose wisely connections, only add those you know or you do business. Whether on LinkedIn, Facebook or other networking site, “it’s much more a game of quality and quantity of a game,” says Canfield. A recruiter may choose to contact one of your connections ask your subject, make sure that person is someone you know and trust.

And there’s really no excuse for sending an automatic, general introduction, Ms. Canfield said. “Take five to 10 seconds to write a couple lines on how you know the other person and why’d you want to connect them can mean the difference between accept or decline your request to connect she said. “It does not hurt to mention that you are more than willing to help them or present them to other people in your network.”

5. Exclusively online

Beginning last year, Washington Tacoma utilities posted a meter reader position of water on his website. The answer? More than 1,600 people have applied for a position $ 17.76 per hour.

With the greatest number of persons currently unemployed (or underemployed), many employers are flooded with large number of applications for the positions they post. To limit the pool of candidates, some have stopped job postings on their Web sites and job boards, “said Tim Schoonover, president of the career consulting firm OI Partners.

Great career choices for trendsetters

Great career choices for trendsetters

If you’re the type that’s usually ahead of the curve, you might be well-suited for these professions.

Marketing Manager

If you have an eye for new trends, a career as a marketing manager is one option to consider. Whether it’s for developing new items or finding innovative ways to advertise existing products, as a marketing manager you could use your trendsetting skills to monitor new fads for promoting your company’s products or services.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, marketing managers usually work with a team of advertising and promotion managers, product development managers, and market research managers. They might play any number of roles in areas like market research, product development – even pricing and advertising.

Fashion Designer

Do you have a passion for fashion? Consider a career in fashion design where you could spot trends and predict the styles, colors, and fabrics that people might be drawn to next season.

By researching trends in the economy and society, fashion designers can create designs that appeal better to the public, says the U.S. Department of Labor. After sketching their designs, they generally work with textile designers and manufacturers to select fabrics, draw sketches, and create prototypes.

Foreign Correspondent

If you hope to explore the world and learn about different cultures, a career as a foreign correspondent might be right up your alley. In this type of career, you could have the opportunity to bring important world issues and trends into the spotlight by gathering information, creating stories, and delivering international news to viewers or readers back home, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Assigned to a country by a publication or station, foreign correspondents usually work under strict deadlines, says the Department of Labor. You might be asked to report the news from the location of a war zone or at the scene of a natural disaster.

Interior Designer

Do you enjoy decorating your home or office? As an interior designer, you could give decorating advice to clients and illustrate the latest interior design trends.

By listening to a client’s needs and wishes, interior designers can create a design that fulfills those requests, says the U.S. Department of Labor. And even though those designs will need to be created with building/safety codes – and budget – in mind, interior designers can still bring their creativity to the table and deliver something that makes the client say, “Wow!”

Chef

Do you love food and enjoy testing new recipes? As a chef, you could put your culinary creativity and trendsetting nature to use, finding new ways to suit the public’s palate by staying in touch with culinary trends, such as healthier alternatives or sustainable food sources.

In addition to overseeing the daily duties of a kitchen staff, chefs might play a role in preparing cost estimates for food and supplies, making work schedules, developing recipes, and planning menus, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

How to avoid stalling your job search

How to avoid stalling your job search

Career experts say applicants sabotage themselves by making these six mistakes.

It’s true that the job market in many professions is extremely tight. Even so, experts say that unemployed people too often make things difficult for themselves by sabotaging their job search. If you want to find a job now, avoid these six common job-hunting mistakes.

1. Being Passive

Some of the worst things a job seeker can do are staying home, avoiding networking or just not following through, according to Susanne Goldstein, career development consultant and author of Carry a Paintbrush: How to Be the Artistic Director of Your Own Career. “When you have a lead, you need to know how to use it well and follow up professionally,” she says. “Complete tasks, send emails with proper grammar [and] make the follow-up calls.”

Jean Baur, senior consultant at recruiting firm Lee Hecht Harrison and author of Eliminated! Now What? Finding Your Way from Job-Loss Crisis to Career Resilience, agrees. “Even if you’re employed, you have to keep your resume-up to-date, keep your network strong and continually growing, and keep updating your skills and learning what’s in demand in the marketplace.”

2. Jumping to Conclusions

Misinformation and bruised egos can lead job seekers to make assumptions that are not always correct. “When people say, ‘I’m not getting offers because I’m too old, too young, too experienced, too inexperienced, too whatever,’ those are just excuses and not even based in reality most of the time,” Baur says. “You need a coach, a network or just a few wise friends who can give you a clear view of what you’re doing right and wrong.”

3. Holding Out for the Perfect Job

If you’re getting by on unemployment benefits, you may be tempted to hold out for the exact job you want and deserve. You may think taking a lesser job will hinder your career path, but a long stint of unemployment could do even more damage to your resume and bank account, according to Roberta Chinsky Matuson, president of Human Resources Solutions and author of Suddenly in Charge. “Who cares what color your parachute is?” she says. “Take the right-now job, excel at it and keep networking until you find the dream job.”

4. Being Inflexible

Today’s workforce needs to be more mobile than ever. But if you have a mortgage or can’t imagine leaving your great school district, you may overlook some great opportunities that require moving. If you can’t relocate, consider whether you can work from home in a telecommuting job. If you’re young, just coming out of college or in a new town, it’s a good idea to rent so you can keep your options open, Matuson says.

5. Making It All About You

Companies hire people out of need, not out of altruism, Goldstein says. She recommends not going about your job search or interview with a “what’s in it for me?” attitude. “Be an aspirin,” she says. “Learn about the company, find out what the company’s pain is and show them how your skills can be solution to that pain.”

6. Having a Cynical and Negative Attitude

The more companies that pass you over, the more tempting it is to develop a chip on your shoulder. But this creates a vicious circle, Matuson says. “Cynicism and other negative attitudes come across in job interviews — and even in letters — and those attitudes can sink your chances,” she says. Matuson’s advice: Surround yourself with positive people, and, if possible, as many employed (or unemployed-but-positive) people as you can.

Does your resumé make you look old?

Does your resumé make you look old?

You might be wise not to broadcast when you got your university degree.

Been applying for work and have little to show for it? Don’t assume the lousy job market is solely to blame. Your résumé could be working against you as well. Best practices for resume writing have changed in recent years, said Wendy Enelow, a management trainer and author of “Expert Résumés for Baby Boomers.” If you have not held, your document can be a sign that you passed your choice.

1. Exaggerate contacts

Multiple phone numbers to summarize the look, you’re a dinosaur, if you specify a fax!

The solution: Instead, simply enter your mobile number and e-mail – without labeling them as such, “said executive coach Donald Asher, author of” The Night Summary.”

2. Relying on clichés

Some language has become so common in resumes that he is now virtually meaningless.

The solution: Skip these words and phrases that LinkedIn to be the most overused in resumes online: innovative, motivated, broad experience, results-oriented, dynamic, proven team player, fast, problem solving, and entrepreneurship. Instead, use keywords from the job, which will help you go beyond the resume-scanning programs, many businesses use today.

3. Do not describe former employers

A young manager of recruitment may not have the same scope of industry knowledge that you are doing, and will not be able to put your experience in context.

The solution: “Unless it’s a Fortune 500 company, add a line like” private company that manufactures pencils in the world, “says Patricia Lenkov, CEO of Agility Executive Search in New York.

4. Using the format obsolete

For your first resume, you may have learned to put dates on the left, but this is not the way he did more.

The fix: List of years – not months, which are only relevant for recent graduates – on the right after your title and company,” said Asher.

5. The sub-self-employment

Job seekers are often too vague on the timing of self-employment, which makes them look like periods of unemployment, “said Lenkov.

The fix: Be specific about the projects you discussed and the names of some of your customers, if you have permission.

6. Lead with a goal

“It’s all about what you want from the company,” says Enelow executive coach. “What is the management company? Are you the scoop in this market.”

The solution: Start with a profile or career summary focusing on what you can contribute. This person might say 15-plus years of experience “the spearhead of the global campaigns of business development. (Why not 28?” Fifteen-plus communicates well qualified, but not on the hill, “says Enelow. ) You can also leave a bulleted list of expertise, such as “developing new clients” or “make financial projections.”

7. Reveal When you got your degrees

Scary as it is, the hiring manager may not yet born.

The solution: Take off grad dates. “Are we fooling anyone by doing it? No, Enelow says, “but at least we’re not slapping them in the face.”

8. Delving too deeply into the past

Your first work experiences are probably far from the level and type of work you do today.

The solution: In general, return just 15 years unless you have significant achievements before, Enelow said.

9. Showcasing Run-of-the-Mill Skills

Declare your familiarity with MS Word, PowerPoint, Excel, or gives the impression that if you just come on board.

The fix: List as specialized software (such as Quick-Books) or new technologies (platform programming Ruby on Rails, for example), said Garrett Miller, a former hiring manager for Pfizer, which now holds CoTria, a consulting firm in workplace productivity.

10. Noting the passive activities

While recreation can create common ground, “said Miller, you do not want to highlight those that make you seem sedentary or without energy.

The fix: Sports such as cycling or running to demonstrate the vibrancy, as well as the activities in which you give – organize a fund-raising, for example. Experts recommended time noting the religious activities such as singing in a church choir, but that has changed and these activities telegraph integrity, a quality that is very important to hiring managers today said Miller.

11. Give little attention to the recent experience

Many older job seekers are hamstrung by outdated rules requiring resume to fit on one page, and so they have their recent crisis – and relevant – the experience until he says nothing.

The solution: Expand your resume to two or three pages is perfectly acceptable for someone in their forties or fifties. Devote half a page to your most recent job, Lenkov said. Ball and action-oriented highlights, making sure to include quantifiable accomplishments such as “Reduced costs by 16% over two years.”

The best jobs outside the cubicle

The best jobs outside the cubicle

If you fantasize about working away from an office, one of these jobs might be for you.

The winter blues are starting to settle, leaving more than one inhabitant of the cabin to look longingly beyond the half gray walls that surround three sides, wondering what else is there.

In fact, there is a little freshness and jobs in demand outside of the cell. Some capitalize on the demand for health care as baby boomers age, while others capitalize on trends in technology and social media. Whatever the reason, these jobs are not bound by the rules Dilbert-Oniani.

“I think many people secretly fantasizing about the freedom that working outside the office provides, ” said Jeremy Redleaf, a filmmaker and creator of employment Odd Job Nation. “Employment outside the cab allows the freedom to build the life you want.”

Question answering virtual

The economy may improve, but companies are still trying to cut costs – and one of the ways they do this is to reduce the number of full-time employees physically in the office, and taking advantage thrust to move more business online.

“We have seen a proliferation of e-businesses looking for ‘virtual field agents” to answer basic questions in real time or write articles on simple tasks, “Redleaf said.” Although it is a great way to make money anywhere, it’s not for slow typists or fatigability -. It is a game volume when they pay per response ”

An ad for a virtual answering question on craigslist appeal to the interests of job seekers to get paid for things they already do: “Do you spend your day watching random things online can be paid for it are we? ” looking for people to respond to questions received by the mobile service most popular in the country. We receive thousands of questions each time and people need to put online and find the answers. You must be at least eighteen years of age and especially his ability to use different search engines. Country-by-question, “the announcement read.
Read more “The best jobs outside the cubicle”

Degrees that hiring managers want

Degrees that hiring managers want

Choosing the right course of study can lead to secure employment, these HR experts say.

Wondering which degrees can get you hired? Why not ask the people who do the hiring? We polled a half-dozen HR managers and experts throughout the country to see what college degrees they want to see on the resumes hitting their desks.

The HR professionals work with employees in all industries, from private-sector firms and public agencies to non-profits, and the consensus was simple: now more than ever, your degree does matter.

“Get this message out to the guidance counselors of America,” said Coy Renick, a Virginia-based HR professional. “It’s not about getting a degree. It’s about getting the right degree.”

#1 Degree – Health Care & Nursing

In a 2010 poll by the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM), 84 percent of HR specialists in the health care industry said they were currently hiring, leading all other sectors of the economy. Echoing that optimism, the U.S. Department of Labor says that 10 of the 20 fastest growing occupations through 2018 are health-related.

Tip #1: “Anything related to the aging population is hot,” said Roberta Matuson of Massachusetts-based Human Resource Solutions. “Whether it’s a nutritionist, nurse, or nursing assistant, many hospitals can’t afford to staff as many doctors, so they are bringing in people who can do a lot of the same things but at a lower cost.”

Tip #2:”Like it or not, outsourcing is a long-term trend so you have to ask yourself: What jobs can be outsourced and what cannot? Many medical jobs cannot,” said Steve Kane, an HR expert and former VP at a Fortune 50 global medical services company.

Degrees in Demand
Medical Assistant
Nursing Assistant
Registered Nurse
Health Care Administration

Careers & Salaries
Home Health Aides: $21,440
Medical Assistants: $28,300
Registered Nurses: $62,450
Health Care Managers: $80,240

#2 Degree – Business

When 100 HR professionals were asked what degree is most likely to get you hired in 2010, a business administration degree finished second, just behind health care, according to a poll by corporate consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Finance and accounting were popular choices too.

Tip #1: “A business degree is always going to have real value,” said Matuson, an HR pro who helps staff nonprofits and small-to large-sized businesses. Her clients include Best Buy and New York Life.

Tip #2: Renick believes specificity is key: “If you have a general business degree, you’re just one of many. But if you specialize in finance, accounting, or HR, it’s easier to find a job.”

Degrees in Demand
Accounting
Business Administration
Finance
Human Resources
MBA

Careers & Salaries
Employment Specialists: $45,470
Accountants: $59,430
Financial Managers: $99,330

#3 Degree – Information Technology (IT)
According to SHRM’s 2010 poll of HR professionals, 75 percent of high-tech companies are hiring. What makes an IT degree so valuable though is that it’s applicable in other industries too.

Tip #1: “The hottest industry for me is IT,” said Renick, who helps staff companies in western Virginia. “You can make 50 or 60 grand right out of school with a two-year degree and the right certification. If you have a bachelor’s or master’s, we’re talking six figures.”

Tip #2: “What’s almost always true and is still true today is that computer science majors are still in demand,” said Kane, a San Francisco-based HR pro. “It never seems to end.”

Degrees in Demand
IT and Information Systems
Networking Administration
Computer Science
Database Technology

Careers & Salaries
Network Administrators: $66,310
Database Administrators: $69,740
Computer Scientists: $97,970

#4 Degree – Education & Teaching

While demand for educators isn’t skyrocketing, employment for teachers and administrators is rising at a steady clip now and into the foreseeable future, according to the Department of Labor, which cites mathematics, science and bilingual education as the most promising fields.

Tip #1: Vivian Leonard, director of HR for the city of Boston, oversees 17,000 employees, including the local school department. “I’ll consider your college degree, internships and any prior work experience,” Leonard said. “You must demonstrate knowledge and a true interest.”

Tip #2: When it comes to jobs, Kane stresses location, location, location: “In cushy suburban locations, there is little demand for teachers. In rural areas, there’s an even supply, while in rough, urban locations they are desperate for teachers. Why? Supply and demand.”

Degrees in Demand
K-12 Education
Special Education
Teaching Certificate
Education Leadership

Careers & Salaries
Childcare Administrators: $39,940
Elementary School Teachers: $52,240
Middle School Teachers: $52,570
High School Teachers: $54,390
High school Principals: $97,486

#5 Degree – Culinary & Hospitality

There is a “substantial” demand for new hires in the culinary and hospitality industries that isn’t expected to let up anytime soon, according to the Department of Labor. They cite a predominately young workforce with a high turnover rate as the main reason for optimism.

Tip #1: “There are some real opportunities in hospitality, especially if you have a bright smile and a positive attitude,” Kane said. “You’ll probably start low and your pay will be low, but you can get promoted and move up the chain of command rapidly since turnover is high.”

Tip #2: Job opportunities for meeting and convention planners will grow by 16 percent between 2008 and 2018, reports the Department of Labor.

Degrees in Demand
Culinary Arts
Baking & Pastry
Marketing/Communications
Restaurant Management

Careers & Salaries
Travel Agents: $30,570
Chefs & Head Cooks: $38,770
Meeting & Convention Planners: $44,260
Lodging Managers: $45,800
Food Service Managers: $46,320