Category: Finding A Job

Plan a career switch this summer

Plan a career switch this summer

Use some free time to take online classes and work toward a new degree.

Thinking of switching careers or adding some skills to your resume? Looking for the right time to go back to school and get your degree? Summertime may be the right time to get started.

Summer classes are quickly becoming a popular option for college students of all kinds, according to Kyle Brown, director of online learning at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Canton.

Summer enrollment at SUNY Canton, for example, has jumped nearly 300 percent over the past four years, says Brown. Much of that growth is due to the fact that 90 percent of its summer classes are available online.

Want to use the summer to get a head start on your education? We’ve spotlighted some of the fastest growing careers through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, and separated them into three different career categories. Using this data, we also included the most common degree or preparation needed in each career. Keep reading to see why summertime may be the right time to start these programs…

Head Start Option 1: Health Care Programs

Looking for a red hot degree program to start this summer? Consider pursuing a degree in health care. With health care reform in full swing, it’s an exciting time to dive into this rewarding profession.

Associate’s in Medical Assisting
Medical Assistant – $29,450

Dental Assisting Certificate
Dental Assistant – $34,000

Associate’s in Nursing
Registered Nurse – $66,530

Did You Know? Ten of the 20 fastest growing jobs in the country through 2018 are in health care, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, and nursing and medical assisting careers are on the list!

Head Start Option 2: Business Programs

Looking to give your career a boost? Start the process this summer and consider studying business. As a whole, the industry is showing positive signs of heating up. In March 2011, small businesses in the U.S. added 50,000 new jobs, according to the Intuit Small Business Employment Index.

Bachelor’s in Accounting
Accountant – $67,430

Bachelor’s in Business
Personal Financial Advisor – $94,180

Master of Business Administration
Marketing Manager – $120,070

Did You Know? Personal financial advisors are enjoying a 30 percent increase in employment opportunities through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Head Start Option 3: Technology Programs

Summer is a perfect time to start gaining the skills one would need to start a career in technology, which is an industry always in search of the next hot thing. What it will be isn’t clear, but it’s safe to say that professionals with a background in technology will be behind it, just like they were for Twitter, iPads, and the like.

Bachelor’s in Information Systems
Computer Support Specialist – $47,360

Bachelor’s in Network Administration
Network Systems Administrator – $70,930

Bachelor’s in Computer Science
Computer Programmer – $74,690

Did You Know? Network systems analysts are enjoying a whopping 53 percent increase in employment opportunities through 2018, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Tags : , , , , ,

Job fields with surprisingly high earnings

Job fields with surprisingly high earnings

You’ll never guess the average incomes in these seven diverse professions.

Career 1 – Public Relations Specialist

Think public relations gigs can’t pay? Think again. Reputation can have a direct impact on profitability, making many companies willing to pay well for PR specialists. In fact, the mean annual wage for this career is $59,370, with the top ten percent earning – on average – $96,630.

Potential career prep: A bachelor’s degree in a subject like communications – plus public relations experience – can provide adequate preparation for careers in this field, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Career 2 – Fashion Designer

Becoming a fashion designer is a good gig. It also has the potential to pay surprisingly well. Fashion designers make about $74,000 annually. Most fashion designer positions are in New York or California, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Potential career prep: Studying fashion design is the first step. You can earn an associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree, which is what employers usually look for, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Career 3 – Art Director

Working as an art director has the potential to pay. Whether you find a position as an art director at a magazine, website, book publisher, or agency, it’s a career that can lead to big bucks. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the average pay for art directors in May 2009 was $91,520.

Potential career prep: To become an art director, you need an extensive, eye-popping portfolio of work, as well as enough experience to prove you’re worthy of the position. Consider studying art and graphic design in school to get started.

Career 4 – Paralegal

Think becoming a lawyer is the only way to make money in the legal field? Think again. Paralegals, who do everything from interviewing potential witnesses to conducting research and assisting lawyers in general office work, have the potential to earn a pretty decent living too. The mean annual wage for paralegals in May 2009 was $50,080, with the top ten percent averaging at $75,700.

Potential career prep: An associate’s or bachelor’s degree in paralegal studies can provide you with career-relevant skills. If you already have a degree, another option is to earn a certificate from a paralegal program.

Career 5 – High School Art, Drama, or Music Teacher

It’s probably not the first teaching title that springs to mind, but the average compensation is surprisingly competitive for high school art, drama, and music teachers, who get to pass along their passion for creativity to a younger generation. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the average annual pay is $68,230.

Potential career prep: A bachelor’s degree is a must for this type of position, as is completion of a teaching education program. To become a public school teacher, you’ll need to get licensed to teach in your home state.

Career 6 – Advertising Sales Agent

It’s not just creative types who can make money in advertising. Companies rely upon advertising sales agents, who make about $53,000 on average, to bring in the revenue they need to turn a profit. The top ten percent of advertising sales agents averaged at $94,100 in May 2009.

Potential career prep: You’ll need a bachelor’s degree to work in sales for most employers, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Studying communications, marketing, or business is recommended.

Career 7 – Police Officer

For police officers, working on behalf of the public has the potential to pay surprisingly well. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this gig pays about $55,000 on average, and $83,550 for the top ten percent of earners. While no part of a community’s budget is sacred these days, law and order remains a priority across the country.

Potential career prep: A high school diploma and some work experience are musts. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, federal agencies expect a college degree.

Tags : , , , , , , , , , ,

Does your resumé make you look old?

Does your resumé make you look old?

You might be wise not to broadcast when you got your university degree.

Been applying for work and have little to show for it? Don’t assume the lousy job market is solely to blame. Your résumé could be working against you as well. Best practices for resume writing have changed in recent years, said Wendy Enelow, a management trainer and author of “Expert Résumés for Baby Boomers.” If you have not held, your document can be a sign that you passed your choice.

1. Exaggerate contacts

Multiple phone numbers to summarize the look, you’re a dinosaur, if you specify a fax!

The solution: Instead, simply enter your mobile number and e-mail – without labeling them as such, “said executive coach Donald Asher, author of” The Night Summary.”

2. Relying on clichés

Some language has become so common in resumes that he is now virtually meaningless.

The solution: Skip these words and phrases that LinkedIn to be the most overused in resumes online: innovative, motivated, broad experience, results-oriented, dynamic, proven team player, fast, problem solving, and entrepreneurship. Instead, use keywords from the job, which will help you go beyond the resume-scanning programs, many businesses use today.

3. Do not describe former employers

A young manager of recruitment may not have the same scope of industry knowledge that you are doing, and will not be able to put your experience in context.

The solution: “Unless it’s a Fortune 500 company, add a line like” private company that manufactures pencils in the world, “says Patricia Lenkov, CEO of Agility Executive Search in New York.

4. Using the format obsolete

For your first resume, you may have learned to put dates on the left, but this is not the way he did more.

The fix: List of years – not months, which are only relevant for recent graduates – on the right after your title and company,” said Asher.

5. The sub-self-employment

Job seekers are often too vague on the timing of self-employment, which makes them look like periods of unemployment, “said Lenkov.

The fix: Be specific about the projects you discussed and the names of some of your customers, if you have permission.

6. Lead with a goal

“It’s all about what you want from the company,” says Enelow executive coach. “What is the management company? Are you the scoop in this market.”

The solution: Start with a profile or career summary focusing on what you can contribute. This person might say 15-plus years of experience “the spearhead of the global campaigns of business development. (Why not 28?” Fifteen-plus communicates well qualified, but not on the hill, “says Enelow. ) You can also leave a bulleted list of expertise, such as “developing new clients” or “make financial projections.”

7. Reveal When you got your degrees

Scary as it is, the hiring manager may not yet born.

The solution: Take off grad dates. “Are we fooling anyone by doing it? No, Enelow says, “but at least we’re not slapping them in the face.”

8. Delving too deeply into the past

Your first work experiences are probably far from the level and type of work you do today.

The solution: In general, return just 15 years unless you have significant achievements before, Enelow said.

9. Showcasing Run-of-the-Mill Skills

Declare your familiarity with MS Word, PowerPoint, Excel, or gives the impression that if you just come on board.

The fix: List as specialized software (such as Quick-Books) or new technologies (platform programming Ruby on Rails, for example), said Garrett Miller, a former hiring manager for Pfizer, which now holds CoTria, a consulting firm in workplace productivity.

10. Noting the passive activities

While recreation can create common ground, “said Miller, you do not want to highlight those that make you seem sedentary or without energy.

The fix: Sports such as cycling or running to demonstrate the vibrancy, as well as the activities in which you give – organize a fund-raising, for example. Experts recommended time noting the religious activities such as singing in a church choir, but that has changed and these activities telegraph integrity, a quality that is very important to hiring managers today said Miller.

11. Give little attention to the recent experience

Many older job seekers are hamstrung by outdated rules requiring resume to fit on one page, and so they have their recent crisis – and relevant – the experience until he says nothing.

The solution: Expand your resume to two or three pages is perfectly acceptable for someone in their forties or fifties. Devote half a page to your most recent job, Lenkov said. Ball and action-oriented highlights, making sure to include quantifiable accomplishments such as “Reduced costs by 16% over two years.”

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Smart careers for intelligent people

Smart careers for intelligent people

Put your brainpower to use in one of these great-paying and challenging fields.

Smart people come in all shapes and sizes. So do smart career choices. A bright NFL quarterback, for example, can read a defense and understand its strengths and weaknesses, all in the blink of an eye. It’s called spatial intelligence, and it’s the same skill that graphic designers use to imagine smart visual solutions that their clients want but can’t articulate.

The bottom line: intelligent people – you know who you are! – are well-suited to certain careers.

These six careers, for example, can be smart options for smart people.

1. Accountant
2. Medical Manager
3. FBI Agent
4. Registered Nurse
5. Computer Systems Administrator
6. Teacher

Keep reading to learn about how you can get into one of these jobs. You’ll be smarter for it…

1 – Accountant

Accountants need to have more than just a knack for numbers. They should also have sound reasoning skills, since the simplest answer is often the right one when dealing with even the most complex calculations.

Education: A quick mind isn’t enough to become an accountant. Formal training matters too. Fortunately, there are plenty of accounting and finance programs that can prepare you for a career as an accountant. A bachelor’s degree is the most common entry-point into the profession.

Average Pay: $67,430

2 – Medical Manager

Health care isn’t just big business; it’s also incredibly complex. As a result, medical managers need a sharp mind and keen business sense to keep up in this ever-evolving industry.

Education: Some medical managers have technical backgrounds, while others are experts in areas like finance or team-building. To qualify for most management roles, you’ll need to earn a bachelor’s degree in an area like health care administration, followed by an MBA.

Average Pay: $90,970
Read more

Tags : , , , , , , , , , , ,

The best jobs outside the cubicle

The best jobs outside the cubicle

If you fantasize about working away from an office, one of these jobs might be for you.

The winter blues are starting to settle, leaving more than one inhabitant of the cabin to look longingly beyond the half gray walls that surround three sides, wondering what else is there.

In fact, there is a little freshness and jobs in demand outside of the cell. Some capitalize on the demand for health care as baby boomers age, while others capitalize on trends in technology and social media. Whatever the reason, these jobs are not bound by the rules Dilbert-Oniani.

“I think many people secretly fantasizing about the freedom that working outside the office provides, ” said Jeremy Redleaf, a filmmaker and creator of employment Odd Job Nation. “Employment outside the cab allows the freedom to build the life you want.”

Question answering virtual

The economy may improve, but companies are still trying to cut costs – and one of the ways they do this is to reduce the number of full-time employees physically in the office, and taking advantage thrust to move more business online.

“We have seen a proliferation of e-businesses looking for ‘virtual field agents” to answer basic questions in real time or write articles on simple tasks, “Redleaf said.” Although it is a great way to make money anywhere, it’s not for slow typists or fatigability -. It is a game volume when they pay per response ”

An ad for a virtual answering question on craigslist appeal to the interests of job seekers to get paid for things they already do: “Do you spend your day watching random things online can be paid for it are we? ” looking for people to respond to questions received by the mobile service most popular in the country. We receive thousands of questions each time and people need to put online and find the answers. You must be at least eighteen years of age and especially his ability to use different search engines. Country-by-question, “the announcement read.
Read more

Tags : , , , , , , ,

20-somethings create their own jobs

20-somethings create their own jobs

In today’s economy, you can’t just wait around for someone to hire you, say young entrepreneurs.

Five years ago, after graduating from New York University with a film degree and thousands of dollars in student loans, Scott Gerber moved back in with his parents on Staten Island. He then took out more loans to start a new-media and technology company, but he didn’t have a clear market in mind; the company went belly up in 2006.

“It made me feel demoralized and humiliated,” he says. “I wondered if this was really what post-collegiate life was supposed to be like. Did I do something wrong? The answers weren’t apparent to me.”

Still in debt, Mr. Gerber considered his career options. His mother kept encouraging him to get a “real” job, the kind that comes with an office and a boss. But, using the last $700 in his bank account, he decided to start another company instead.

With the new company, called Sizzle It, Mr. Gerber vowed to find a niche, reduce overhead and generally be more frugal. The company, which specializes in short promotional videos, was profitable the first year, he says.

Mr. Gerber, now 27, isn’t a millionaire, but he’s paid off his loans and doesn’t have to live with his parents (he rents an apartment in Hoboken, N.J.). And he thinks his experience can help other young people who face a daunting unemployment rate.

In October, Mr. Gerber started the Young Entrepreneur Council “to create a shift from a résumé-driven society to one where people create their own jobs,” he says. “The jobs are going to come from the entrepreneurial level.”

The council consists of 80-plus business owners across the country, ages 17 to 33. Members include Scott Becker, 23, co-founder of Invite Media, an advertising technology firm recently acquired by a Google unit; Lauren Berger, 26, founder of the Intern Queen, a site that connects college students with internships; Aaron Patzer, the 30-year-old who sold Mint.com to Intuit for $170 million; and Josh Weinstein, 24, who started CollegeOnly.com, a social networking site that is backed by a PayPal founder.

The council, which has applied for nonprofit status, serves as a help desk and mentoring hotline for individual entrepreneurs. People can also submit questions on subjects like marketing, publicity and technology, and each month a group of council members will answer 30 to 40 of them in business publications like The Wall Street Journal and American Express Open Forum, and on dozens of small business Web sites.

Council members assert that young people can start businesses even if they have little or no money or experience. But whether those start-ups last is another matter. Roughly half of all new businesses fail within the first five years, according to federal data. And the entrepreneurial life is notoriously filled with risks, stresses and sacrifices.

But then again, unemployment is 9.8 percent; Mr. Gerber’s in-box is flooded with e-mails from young people who have sent out hundreds of résumés for corporate jobs and come up empty. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, only 24.4 percent of 2010 graduates who applied for a job had one waiting for them after graduation (up from 19.7 percent in 2009). What do some people have to lose?

THE lesson may be that entrepreneurship can be a viable career path, not a renegade choice — especially since the promise of “Go to college, get good grades and then get a job,” isn’t working the way it once did. The new reality has forced a whole generation to redefine what a stable job is.

“I’ve seen all these people go to Wall Street, and those were supposed to be the good jobs. Now they are out of work,” says Windsor Hanger, 22, who turned down a marketing position at Bloomingdale’s to work on HerCampus.com, an online magazine. “It’s not a pure dichotomy anymore that entrepreneurship is risky and other jobs are safe, so why not do what I love?”

Tags : , , , , , ,

Hot careers through 2018 and beyond

Hot careers through 2018 and beyond

These fields are likely to offer good pay and job security in coming years.

Are you ready to learn about some of the hottest careers? Check out these hot job opportunities through 2018 and beyond… then see how you can get started.

Hot Career 1: Accountant / Auditor

Accountants keep finances in order by taking care of things like overseeing cash flow and filing tax paperwork. Auditors analyze finances to ensure everything is being done according to the law.

Hot factors

• There were 1.3 million accountant and auditor jobs in 2008…
• And the Department of Labor projects about 279,400 new positions to be added through 2018.
• Changing financial laws, evolving regulations, and more detailed scrutiny of company finances mean fast job growth for accountants.

Hot Career 2: Medical Assistant

As a medical assistant in the growing health care field, you’ll work to keep a hospital, clinic, or doctor’s office running smoothly by keeping records and/or taking patients’ vital signs.

Hot factors

• Medical assistants held a whopping 483,600 jobs in 2008, and that number is projected to grow…
• In fact, medical assisting is one of the fastest growing jobs out there. The Department of Labor projects a 34 percent growth rate from 2008-2018.
• More health care facilities are employing people who can do administrative as well as clinical work, which means more opportunities for medical assistants with the right training.

Read more

Tags : , , , , , ,

Breakout careers that are coming of age

Breakout careers that are coming of age

These hot professions combine new technology with some tried-and-true skills.

Every generation has its own music, its own fashion and…its own jobs. Case in point: These days there is an exciting fresh crop of careers that are coming of age that combine new uses of technology with some tried and true skills.

Want to get in on the ground floor as these careers grow up? Check out our list of 6 hot new jobs that are coming of age in 2010, and find out what you need to do to jump into one of these exciting jobs…

Hot New Career 1 – Social Media Strategist

Do you love Twitter? Why not get paid to tweet? Seriously! Social media strategists figure out optimal ways to get messages out to the masses using the latest community tools online. This involves blogging, tweeting, and using sites like Foursquare and Facebook to find and communicate with customers.

Average Salaries:
Bloggers: $32,000
PR Writers: $58,740
Social Media Strategists: $61,000

Hot New Career 2 – Homeland Security

If you are looking for a challenging career with high stakes, consider Homeland Security. The Department of Homeland Security, which was formed as a result of the September 11 attacks, is responsible for everything from cyber security to border protection. As just one example of this career’s growth pattern, in August 2010, President Obama signed a $600 million bill that pays for 1,000 new Border Patrol agents.

Average Salaries:
Executive Branch Paralegals: $58,540
Federal Criminal Investigators: $73,170
Customs and Border Protection Agents: $92,558

Read more

Tags : , , , ,

Degrees that hiring managers want

Degrees that hiring managers want

Choosing the right course of study can lead to secure employment, these HR experts say.

Wondering which degrees can get you hired? Why not ask the people who do the hiring? We polled a half-dozen HR managers and experts throughout the country to see what college degrees they want to see on the resumes hitting their desks.

The HR professionals work with employees in all industries, from private-sector firms and public agencies to non-profits, and the consensus was simple: now more than ever, your degree does matter.

“Get this message out to the guidance counselors of America,” said Coy Renick, a Virginia-based HR professional. “It’s not about getting a degree. It’s about getting the right degree.”

#1 Degree – Health Care & Nursing

In a 2010 poll by the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM), 84 percent of HR specialists in the health care industry said they were currently hiring, leading all other sectors of the economy. Echoing that optimism, the U.S. Department of Labor says that 10 of the 20 fastest growing occupations through 2018 are health-related.

Tip #1: “Anything related to the aging population is hot,” said Roberta Matuson of Massachusetts-based Human Resource Solutions. “Whether it’s a nutritionist, nurse, or nursing assistant, many hospitals can’t afford to staff as many doctors, so they are bringing in people who can do a lot of the same things but at a lower cost.”

Tip #2:”Like it or not, outsourcing is a long-term trend so you have to ask yourself: What jobs can be outsourced and what cannot? Many medical jobs cannot,” said Steve Kane, an HR expert and former VP at a Fortune 50 global medical services company.

Degrees in Demand
Medical Assistant
Nursing Assistant
Registered Nurse
Health Care Administration

Careers & Salaries
Home Health Aides: $21,440
Medical Assistants: $28,300
Registered Nurses: $62,450
Health Care Managers: $80,240

#2 Degree – Business

When 100 HR professionals were asked what degree is most likely to get you hired in 2010, a business administration degree finished second, just behind health care, according to a poll by corporate consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Finance and accounting were popular choices too.

Tip #1: “A business degree is always going to have real value,” said Matuson, an HR pro who helps staff nonprofits and small-to large-sized businesses. Her clients include Best Buy and New York Life.

Tip #2: Renick believes specificity is key: “If you have a general business degree, you’re just one of many. But if you specialize in finance, accounting, or HR, it’s easier to find a job.”

Degrees in Demand
Accounting
Business Administration
Finance
Human Resources
MBA

Careers & Salaries
Employment Specialists: $45,470
Accountants: $59,430
Financial Managers: $99,330

#3 Degree – Information Technology (IT)
According to SHRM’s 2010 poll of HR professionals, 75 percent of high-tech companies are hiring. What makes an IT degree so valuable though is that it’s applicable in other industries too.

Tip #1: “The hottest industry for me is IT,” said Renick, who helps staff companies in western Virginia. “You can make 50 or 60 grand right out of school with a two-year degree and the right certification. If you have a bachelor’s or master’s, we’re talking six figures.”

Tip #2: “What’s almost always true and is still true today is that computer science majors are still in demand,” said Kane, a San Francisco-based HR pro. “It never seems to end.”

Degrees in Demand
IT and Information Systems
Networking Administration
Computer Science
Database Technology

Careers & Salaries
Network Administrators: $66,310
Database Administrators: $69,740
Computer Scientists: $97,970

#4 Degree – Education & Teaching

While demand for educators isn’t skyrocketing, employment for teachers and administrators is rising at a steady clip now and into the foreseeable future, according to the Department of Labor, which cites mathematics, science and bilingual education as the most promising fields.

Tip #1: Vivian Leonard, director of HR for the city of Boston, oversees 17,000 employees, including the local school department. “I’ll consider your college degree, internships and any prior work experience,” Leonard said. “You must demonstrate knowledge and a true interest.”

Tip #2: When it comes to jobs, Kane stresses location, location, location: “In cushy suburban locations, there is little demand for teachers. In rural areas, there’s an even supply, while in rough, urban locations they are desperate for teachers. Why? Supply and demand.”

Degrees in Demand
K-12 Education
Special Education
Teaching Certificate
Education Leadership

Careers & Salaries
Childcare Administrators: $39,940
Elementary School Teachers: $52,240
Middle School Teachers: $52,570
High School Teachers: $54,390
High school Principals: $97,486

#5 Degree – Culinary & Hospitality

There is a “substantial” demand for new hires in the culinary and hospitality industries that isn’t expected to let up anytime soon, according to the Department of Labor. They cite a predominately young workforce with a high turnover rate as the main reason for optimism.

Tip #1: “There are some real opportunities in hospitality, especially if you have a bright smile and a positive attitude,” Kane said. “You’ll probably start low and your pay will be low, but you can get promoted and move up the chain of command rapidly since turnover is high.”

Tip #2: Job opportunities for meeting and convention planners will grow by 16 percent between 2008 and 2018, reports the Department of Labor.

Degrees in Demand
Culinary Arts
Baking & Pastry
Marketing/Communications
Restaurant Management

Careers & Salaries
Travel Agents: $30,570
Chefs & Head Cooks: $38,770
Meeting & Convention Planners: $44,260
Lodging Managers: $45,800
Food Service Managers: $46,320

Tags : , , , , , , ,

Finding a job on Twitter

Finding a job on Twitter

What if a little bird could help you with your job search? Well, it may not be the bluebird of happiness, but social networking and microblogging site Twitter can be one tweet job search tool.

Say What? As a career-minded woman youre always who embraces the latest technology trends such as Twitter, so you’ll definitely want to spend time at the site with an eye toward how it can lead to employment opportunities.

If you’re new to Twitter, you’ll first want to familiarize yourself with the basics of the site. Twitter, like other social networks, allows you to create a profile. Unlike other social networks, the profile isn’t in-depth.

In fact, that’s the beauty of Twitter: Everything is abbreviated. At Twitter, you’re limited to what you can say. Posts, known as tweets, must be 140 characters or less. You can, however, link to other sites, and many people use the site in this way.

The concept of Twitter is to post short messages, while getting people to follow what you have to say. You gain followers and you follow others. Okay, it all sounds fascinating, but what does any of this have to do with looking for a job? Plenty.

Think of Twitter as a platform, a soapbox, if you will, from which you can broadcast your message. In fact, the image here of a chick on a microphone is a good metaphor. And Twitter really can help you get the word out.

That word might be that you’re an expert in your field. By providing regular commentary about your industry or profession, you can establish yourself as a person in the know, and you will gain interested followers.

Your followers are now contacts, who have other contacts. If you tweet that you’re involved in a job search, particularly once you’ve established yourself as a legitimate professional, your contacts will likely offer assistance in the form of information and/or job leads.

Your tweets about a job search can also include links to your personal website or your LinkedIn profile. This, in turn, will provide people with easy access to your background. With a tweet and link, you can let others know how accomplished you are.

Read more

Tags : , , , , , ,