Category: Finding A Job

5 Tips to prepare your first job interview

5 Tips to prepare your first job interview

You have completed high school or college and now you’re ready for your first “real” job. You have sent resumes and were called for your first interview. How can you do well in the interview so that you end up being offered the position?

1. Dress professionally. No belly shirts, low cut blouses or flip-flops, because you will work and not the beach. Although it is not necessary to buy a costume, it is particularly important to look professional. If you try to get a job in an office as a conservative accounting firm, do not dress like you’re going to a concert. If you apply for a retail job, you have a little more free. Rather than list and this garment is not acceptable, I would tell you to dress as if you were going to meet one of the most important people in your life because you are!

2. Make sure you are well groomed. Do not look like you just get out of bed and could not bother to take care of basic personal hygiene. Nothing is going to be the HR Manager interview to a close faster than dirty hair, dirty nails and body odor. As an employee, you will be a reflection of society and no customer wants to do business with someone uneducated.

3. Be aware of your body language. A firm handshake at the beginning of the interview shows that you are confident. Maintain eye contact, stay relaxed and pay attention to the interviewer. Ask questions and listen thoughtfully to the answers. Think before you answer the questions the interviewer will walk and keep the conversation on the subject.

4. Be prepared for the interview. Research the company in advance, each company now has a website where you can learn what they do and who their clients. This shows the interviewer that you are interested in the job and took the initiative to find everything I could about the company.

5. Be present in the interview. I interviewed candidates who have acted as if they were waiting for a bus. They do not ask questions but simply listened to me, and I was not really sure if they were attentive. Be enthusiastic, ask questions and participate in the interview. After listing all the functions required for the position, I asked a candidate if this sounds like something she was interested in His answer was easy, “I can do the job.” She did not answer my question, she seemed indifferent and did not get the job. If you can not be excited in the interview, you will not be excited to work either.

First impressions count, and want to let the interviewer that you want the job, are willing to work hard and do your best. You may not necessarily be the most qualified candidate, but still get the job because you were the person most remarkable. Good luck!

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Job-search moves you should avoid

Job-search moves you should avoid

Eager candidates often make these giant blunders without even knowing it.

The phone call desperate post-interview, the proclamation of self-doubt, and means more to deny blundering your chances of winning the job. Despite economic recovery, employers are often slow to display the offers and make hiring decisions. It’s a frustrating situation that can lead to job applicants who wish to act against-productive, timing promising opportunities. Here is our list of 10 real-life job search failures, we hope to serve as cautionary tales job seekers. Do not reproduce these acts against-productive.

Gratuitous infliction interrogation

I was reviewing resumes and found one that stands out in a positive way. I sent an email of the sender and asked if he had one minute to speak by telephone. “I could,” he wrote back. “Where is the company located, what is the starting salary, which is the CEO, and how long have you been in business?” That was the end of the correspondence, our address is on our home page, the salary was included in the job, and the history of the company (including the date of creation and leadership bios) was in the About section of our site. In its haste to ensure its time was not wasted, a reasonable goal, in my opinion, the gentleman asked me to answer four questions that had already been answered if he had done some homework. Lesson: It is to guard against time-sucking job advertisements or even false, but doing so that you do not shoot in the foot.

Forget who you are interviewing with

The Executive Director of a small not for profit sharing that story with me. “I miraculously have enough money of my commission to hire a marketing director last year,” she said. “I was on the moon. I had a job opening to fill valuable. I interviewed five people, three of them from industry and two non-profit world. One of the people in the industry was super intelligent and insightful.

Sadly, she knocked out of the race halfway through the interview. “” How? “I wanted to know.” I asked him to tell me a story that illustrates how it rolls. I told him to think about our agency and five people we need in marketing, and tell me a story of his career that would make it clear that it belongs here. She told me a story about a 24-month project intranet development involving 60 people across functions and six or seven levels of the organization approvals. I was almost asleep when she finished. I think this lady really needs a big company atmosphere. “The history of the job seeker intranet shouted” I do not understand Scrappy non-profit at all. “Lesson: In your job search written communication and especially on an interview, keep your stories and questions relevant to the issues the hiring manager is.

Selling Yourself Short

A friend of an employment agency told me this story. Last summer, she was a candidate on the short list of two finalists for a position in sales management plum. She had just gotten on the phone with the hiring manager, who said: “I have to sleep on it, but I think your guy is Frank get the job tomorrow,” when Frank himself called it. “Do not be angry against me,” says Frank. “Oh, no,” said the officer. “What were you doing, Frank?”

Frank had received the fear and called the hiring manager to say, “If you do not want me in the spot sales manager, I will take a sales territory assignment.” The director was hired in the work territory involved and the other finalist for the work of sales management. The lady agency did not say how he would come to Frank paid the increase, more jobs. Lesson: stay the course. You will never show the employer what you are worth, or to persuade them that you need, crawling.

You leave Vanquish minor adversity

“I am so frustrated with my job search,” said one man I met at the library. “I had an interview last week, and when I got to 20 after 5, the door was locked,” he said. “Did you go back?” I asked. “Did you call or text or HR hiring manager?” “No, I went home,” said the gentleman. “When I returned, there was a message telling me the door was locked and I should go there, but I left the house before the message arrived.”

“Did you see?” I asked. “No, I thought the opportunity was lost.” “Call them!” I said. He did, but they had already completed the task. Lesson: the types of recruitment business are no different from someone else, they make mistakes . In an interview back in my 20s, I toured the entire building looking for an open door for an interview for 5:30, and I finally crossed the loading dock for Show your ingenuity to get by rolling with the punches interview.

Sending a thank-generic

I interviewed a brilliant young man for a role of business development. “Look, Barry,” I said. “I assure you that we are on the same page. Over the next two days, send me an e-mail and tell me what you heard today. It need not be long. Just write a couple of paragraphs on what you see as our competitive position and how you approach the assignment as I know we will be in sync.

“Barry gladly accepted. An hour later, I had the generic post-interview thank you e-mail from Barry, saying,” Dear Ms. Ryan, Thank you very much for chatting with me today. I’m excited to work for your business and I know will do a great job. “Today we would call an Epic Fail in the department, showing understanding. Lesson: What the hiring manager asks you or not, make post-interview thank you a summary of the conversation in an intelligent manner, emphasizing that the company faces and how you are equipped to meet these challenges.

Offering a package (double) incorrect information

A reader called me for advice, saying, “I am targeting an opening Product Manager at Company X. I go to a trade show where they are exposed. “We talked about the visit of the company’s booth and chat with employees. A week later, she called again.” I visited the stand but everyone was busy, so I left a package for the sales manager.” “Hmm, the sales manager? “I asked. I thought a likely level of sales director for the interest Job search of an employee not selling packages deposited during a trade show chaotic. What was in the package? “I left him a note to an article I wrote for a newspaper of industry some years ago, ” she said.

“Was the article about Company X?” I asked. “No,” she said, “It was a story about the software documentation.” Unfortunately, the company X is not a software company. Busy working people are inundated with information. Search Job Openings must be specific. My partner could have obtained the name of the hiring manager through a short conversation if she had stuck around this stand as the crew lounge had one minute to discuss. Section n unrelated has not helped his cause and was likely thrown into the recycling bin. Lesson: Your target is the person hiring manager. Other random people in the organization in general are not great unless that led ‘They are your friends. And all the materials you send must be clear what you want and why anyone should care.

Frantically self-doubt

The CEO of a technology start-up called me. “What now?” he said. “I ran an ad, and a lady wrote to me immediately with a large e-mail. I answered saying, “I’d love to talk when you have time. “She wrote to tell me she is not all that technique, and I replied by saying that we need more than just technical people. She wrote again to make sure I knew that ‘It really is not anything technical. At that time, I tried to understand why she responded to the ad at all, but his resume was great, so I said,’ Let’s just get together and go from there.”

Then she wrote again to ask if there would be technical tests at interview. We do not use anything like that, but I lost faith at that point and gave up. Please tell your readers to go with the flow. There is no point in you acing out of employment opportunities because you fear you might get ejected at some point later in the process. “Lesson: Work of the process. At a minimum, you make valuable contacts, learn new things, practice your interview skills, and give you a reason to get dressed.

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How to use Twitter when you search for a job

How to use Twitter when you search for a job

If you’re among the millions of people seeking work, there is more of a social networking site that you may have to join Twitter.

Twitter? For the job search? In the history of Kyle Flaherty. He left a job in marketing at Boston determined to find a job in-house public relations. He tweeted about his decision and included a link to her professional blog, where he described the kind of work he sought. A few days later, his tweet was retweeted. In other words, knowledge was passed – to his current boss.

“I do not think I got it if not for Twitter,” said Flaherty, who moved from Boston to Austin, Texas, for the new job with a pregnant woman and a two year old son.

Twitter basics

Twitter, as you probably know, is the social networking site that lets you send tweets – the equivalent of text messages or status updates from Facebook, but limited to 140 characters. You must keep them very short and simple. To register, simply fill out an online profile. Then you can send tweets and view on your computer, cell phone or mobile internet device. Unlike Facebook, you can follow (receive tweets from) someone, there is no formal process of requesting and accepting.

When you register to monitor tweets from someone, they see that you’re next. It’s a good thing, because they may decide to reciprocate and follow you, too, which is something you want if you are a professional trying to get noticed.

“Twitter gives you access to people you might not otherwise meet or encounter,” says Miriam Salpeter, Career Coach and founder of Keppie Careers in Atlanta.

Join the conversation

Needless to say, not everyone has a job simply tweeting on their employment status. But Twitter, like LinkedIn, Facebook, and industry conferences, is a way to reach out and reach out to people who know the hiring managers or you can submit them.

Many people use Twitter to share ramblings blind, like “having a hamburger with friends this afternoon.” But the most clever Twitterers use to comment on events in their professions. Tweets they follow industry leaders and even to establish informal relations following one another.

If you have never used Twitter, do not sign up immediately and furnaces people with a message saying that you are unemployed. Instead, create a slow dynamics. Open an account and include something about your profession in your username. Since users can search by subject tweets is a way to make your feed more visible.

“I automatically follow back anyone who has a job or jobs in their title,” says Salpeter, whose name is keppie_careers Twitter.

In the profile section, add a few lines about what you do professionally – which also contributes to your searchable.

Before start tweeting, research leaders in your industry, the companies you want to work, and any other professional contacts. Follow them. Many companies – including marketing, public relations, and technology – using Twitter to post job offers, and many hiring managers tweet, too.

“You can hear about jobs, an idea for a business to determine how to interact with them and see how you fit in,” Flaherty said.

Make an impression

Then, start tweeting. Give your opinion on the news, industry events, and seminars. If someone is following you, especially a leader in the industry, says something controversial or interesting, retweet (before), or send the person a direct answer. This may be an ideal way to get a conversation, but more personal.

If you are a hiring manager in a company you want to work out what he or she writes and then adapt your tweets to comment on such things.

This is what John Johansen did when he decided he wanted to leave Boston for a more affordable. It targets marketing professionals in Raleigh, North Carolina, Portland, Oregon, and Austin – and began following their tweets. When someone in the media said something very interesting, he replied with a message @ – public comment. This helped him develop relationships with marketing professionals in the cities. In turn, introduced him to others on Twitter.

As he found he had wanted to work for companies, Johansen Twitter search to locate their employees. In this way, he found the head of human resources for Bulldog Solutions, a marketing agency in Austin. “I had been following their ballots and had an interest in working there,” he said. “I learned of their human resources director has been on Twitter, so I contacted her.” They met, she asked her resume – and he was hired.

“Much of the use of Twitter is that it allowed me to break the ice,” said Johansen. “For a job seeker, it is a way of saying:” I can show you that I am a real person, I see you are a real person, and we have a connection. From the employer side, they can see what a person is talking about when they are on Twitter and how they operate outside of work. ”

Johansen has laid off five months after it began, because of the economic slowdown. He jumped back on Twitter and was used to find freelance work.

“There is nothing revolutionary about such things,” said Flaherty. “It is evolutionary. Back in the day, we sent letters a few years later e-mails, and a few years later we have updated our blogs. The beauty of Twitter is that it’s as if you’re on a network if all the time, in real time. “

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How to become an FBI agent

How to become an FBI agent

Becoming a special agent can start with five types of jobs many people already have.

Since Jimmy Cagney played an agent in the movie 1935 G-Men, the public’s imagination was captured by the FBI. Since then, the emblematic figures as Clarice Starling in The Silence of the Lambs and Mulder and Scully in The X-Files have only fueled the fires.

You probably think that your chances of becoming an FBI agent are almost as likely to become a professional footballer or an astronaut, right? Well, think again. So how can we really become an agent yourself? If you think everything is about how you take a gun and conducting interrogations intense, you’re wrong.

According to the FBI, there are five different entry programs “through which job seekers can be considered for the role of Special Agent. And the surprising news? Some of these trails are anything but rare, special type housing career. In fact, there is a good chance that people of all normal days have what it takes to be a G-Man.

1. Accounting

If you are an accountant, you might not think of you as raw FBI – but the Bureau begs to differ. In fact, if you’re a CPA certified with a bachelor’s degree and at least three years experience in Accounting or equivalent business, the FBI would be very interested in talking with you. That would be an interesting career change, would it not?

2. Information Technology / Information

If you want to inject a bit of intrigue and excitement in your IT career, you might consider working for the FBI. Given that many surveys have changed in the digital world, it is not surprising that the FBI is looking for computer experts. Investigators regularly comb through massive amounts of digital data to find the clue that could solve a seemingly unsolvable crime or prevent a terrorist attack.

The FBI is looking for candidates with a bachelor’s degree in computer science or electrical engineering or any degree with a Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) certification or Internetworking Expert (CCIE) certification.

3. Language

Based on the current needs of the Bureau, the mastery of certain language is absolutely essential. With an honors degree in a discipline – more knowledge of Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, Hebrew, Hindi, and many other languages, you can benefit from this route of entry of the FBI, assuming you can a test of high competence.

So if you’re fluent, you have a chance to put those skills to good use. And you thought the language of your mother made you take were worthless. Find courses and foreign language curriculum now.

4. Law

Another way the FBI is to become a lawyer. You must qualify in obtaining a doctorate from a law school approved. Before attending law school, people tend to earn a bachelor’s degree in a discipline such as English, political science or criminal justice.

5. Diversified

The FBI program enrollment fifth and last may in fact be called “the other” because it covers all fields other than the Board deems appropriate. Are you a psychologist, policeman, scientist or a mathematician? This may be your ticket to become a special agent.

If you are interested in this program, you’ll need an undergraduate degree as a BA or BS plus three years experience of full-time work in your field of expertise. Or for those with a graduate degree, you need two years of professional experience.

So as you can see, today the FBI has come a long way with machine guns and busts bootlegger, and, therefore, is actively seeking a wide range of talent agents and different backgrounds. Chances are, with the right training, you too can join the ranks of the FBI proud.

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Landing a job in the publishing industry

Landing a job in the publishing industry

There is no secret how to find a job in the publishing industry like an editor, copywriter or a writer. The truth is landing a job in the publishing industry is like finding a job in any other industry. Preparation and assertiveness are always key ingredients to succeed. There is never a quick fix to a job search so you have spend time, effort and money before you can actually get the job of your dreams.

In order to help you to succeed in landing your publishing industry job, here are some steps that can help you along the way:

Become qualified for the position you desire;
Learn to demonstrate your qualifications;
Research prospective employers;

Call up employers;
Master the interview process;
Follow up after the interview and when things do not work out;
Start over from step 1.

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Five mistakes online job hunters make

Five mistakes online job hunters make

In a tight labor market, building and maintaining an online presence is essential for networking and job search.

Done right, it can be an important tool for the present and the future of networking and value to potential employers try to get an idea of who you are, your talents and experience.

Done wrong, it can easily get out of the race for most positions. Here are five mistakes job seekers make online:

1. Forgetting manners

If you use Twitter or you write a blog, you should assume that hiring managers and recruiters to read your updates and messages. In December 2009 a study by Microsoft Corp. revealed that 79% of hiring managers and recruiters review the information online about candidates before making a hiring decision. Of those, 70 said they% rejected candidates based on information they find online. Key reasons listed? Concerns about lifestyle, inappropriate comments, and inappropriate photos and video.

“Everything is indexed and able to search,” says Miriam Salpeter, a job search, Atlanta-based coach and social media. “Even Facebook, which many people consider a more private network, can easily become a trap for job seekers who post things they would not want a prospective boss to see.”

Do not be lulled into thinking your privacy settings are foolproof. “All it takes is one person sharing the information that you might not want to share, send a message, or breach of trust for the illusion of privacy in a closed network of be eliminated, “says Salpeter, who recommends not post anything illegal (even if it’s a joke), criticism of a boss, colleague or client, information about an investigator or anything sexual or discriminatory. “Suppose that your future boss is reading everything that you share online,” she said.

2. Overkill

Inerting social media networks with half-profiles does nothing except to annoy the people you want to correct that impression: potential employees try to find more information about you.

An online profile is very much more effective than many others do not and incomplete, “said Sree Sreenivasan, dean of students at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He decided early to limit to three social networking sites: Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. “It is simply not enough time” he said. “Pick two or three, then cultivate a presence there.”

Many people make the mistake of joining LinkedIn and other social media sites and then just let their public profiles sit unfinished, says Krista Canfield, a spokesman LinkedIn. “Just signing up for an account is not enough,” she said. “At a minimum, make sure you are connected to at least 35 people and make sure your profile is 100 percent. Members with complete profiles are 40 times more likely to receive offers of LinkedIn. ”

LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter are the three most popular social networking sites for human resources managers to use for recruitment, according to a poll released last month by JobVite, a recruitment software company.

3. Not getting the word out

When the accounting firm Dixon Hughes had recently opened a business development manager, Emily Bennington, company director of marketing and development, posted a link to the occasion on his Facebook page. “I immediately received emails deprived of many people in my network, none of them I knew were on the market for a new job, she said. “I understand there are privacy issues when it comes to job search, but if nobody knows you’re looking for is also a problem.”

Change what may be as simple as updating your status on LinkedIn and other social networking site for people to know that you are open to new positions. If you are currently employed and do not want your boss to find out that you need, you will need to be more subtle. One way is to give potential employers a sense of how you might fit in, “said Dan Schawbel, author of” Me 2.0 “and founder of the millennium mark. “I would recommend a placement, or the personal brand statement which describes who you are, what you do, and what audience you serve, so people an idea of how you can benefit their business.”

4. Quantity over quality

Choose wisely connections, only add those you know or you do business. Whether on LinkedIn, Facebook or other networking site, “it’s much more a game of quality and quantity of a game,” says Canfield. A recruiter may choose to contact one of your connections ask your subject, make sure that person is someone you know and trust.

And there’s really no excuse for sending an automatic, general introduction, Ms. Canfield said. “Take five to 10 seconds to write a couple lines on how you know the other person and why’d you want to connect them can mean the difference between accept or decline your request to connect she said. “It does not hurt to mention that you are more than willing to help them or present them to other people in your network.”

5. Exclusively online

Beginning last year, Washington Tacoma utilities posted a meter reader position of water on his website. The answer? More than 1,600 people have applied for a position $ 17.76 per hour.

With the greatest number of persons currently unemployed (or underemployed), many employers are flooded with large number of applications for the positions they post. To limit the pool of candidates, some have stopped job postings on their Web sites and job boards, “said Tim Schoonover, president of the career consulting firm OI Partners.

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Five tough jobs with low pay, high stress

Five tough jobs with low pay, high stress

These careers can be compelling and offer important services, but they are far from easy.

What makes a job awful? Lousy growth potential? A micromanaging boss? Unsupportive, lazy colleagues? One website surveyed workers in a variety of industries and discovered that it’s not high stress or low pay that determines career misery — it’s both. The combination of being stressed out and broke trumps all other career-related gripes.

Certainly there are higher-stress jobs out there, but if the pay is good, workers seem willing to bear the anxiety. Likewise, for the totally stress-averse, there are plenty of jobs that won’t ruffle feathers, but also likely won’t pay well.

Unfortunately, as with chemical-dependency counselors or parole officers, many of the workers dealing with high stress and low pay provide essential social services. “We can’t have a society with no probation officers, no social workers,” says Al Lee, director of quantitative analysis at PayScale.com. “We should maybe talk about where we want to spend our money as a society.”

The following is a list of jobs and their annual salaries from PayScale.com that have the double-whammy of high stress and low pay:

1. Supportive Residential Counselor – Median Annual Salary: $26,900

It’s not hard to imagine that running a residential home for the mentally ill or physically disabled would be demanding and stressful at times. But when you add the challenge of maneuvering through the tangled bureaucracies that often accompany any public-service infrastructure, you have all the makings of a stressful job.

Just ask Paula S. Gilbert, a licensed mental health counselor who held a full-time supervisory position in a residential home for mentally ill young adults. The home is overseen by the New York State Office of Mental Health. At the time, Gilbert had more than four years of work experience, and earned around $38,000 per year. She quit after about a year, but not because of the salary.

“The staff was very difficult to manage, and no one was really helping me,” she says. “There was an overall lack of support and training. I pieced things together day by day. It was very high-stress.”

2. Import / Export Agent – Median Annual Salary: $36,700

Import/export agents are typically found at the center of deals where goods are bought and sold internationally. They act as mediators and sometimes facilitators between the buyer and seller. Agents must abide by a strict set of rules and guidelines on international trade. The job is highly stressful, in part, because it’s commission-based. If you’re not able to get all parties to come to an agreement, your paycheck disappears with their deal.

3. Chemical-Dependency Counselor – Median Annual Salary: $38,900

These counselors deal with addicted individuals who are often in the throes of a calamitous life event. And rather than accepting the help of a counselor voluntarily, many of these people are legally required to take it. While the work can be compelling, substance-abuse counseling ranks as one of the most difficult social work jobs due to its emotional challenges. Watching clients relapse and sometimes become ill or die can take its toll.

4. Probation Officer – Median Annual Salary: $39,900

Probation officers spend the majority of their time working in prisons, courthouses and detention centers. They supervise and follow up with sentenced offenders, often working with social workers and other care providers to ensure that offenders are attempting to live lawfully.

“I don’t remember many happy days of my job,” says Charles Merwin, a retired probation officer in Suffolk County, New York. “The system is challenged. The people are troubled. You had to be a little bit good at everything. You had to remind yourself you were doing good work.”

5. News Reporter – Median Annual Salary: $40,900

Digging up details on the latest news story is hard work. The financial struggles that have plagued the newspaper industry in recent years make this role even more stressful. Still, many news reporters might not want to change to a lower-stress career because the work wouldn’t feel as important.

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Careers with strong growth potential

Careers with strong growth potential

Whether you’re just starting out or switching professions, check out these promising fields.

Looking to rebound from the recession in a new, growing career? Whether you’re on the brink of embarking on your first career, switching careers, or looking for work after a slump, the good news is that there are some careers that aren’t going anywhere. Check out these careers with strong growth factors – then see if any are right for you.

Career 1 – Accountant

If you’re comfortable working with numbers, there’s lots of opportunity out there for helping individuals and companies manage their money as an accountant. To qualify for this role, you’ll need at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related area, says the U.S. Department of Labor.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that between 2008 and 2018, accounting will be one of the fastest-growing occupations in the country with 22 percent growth. The profession is projected to add 279,000 jobs in the ten year time frame.

What Accountants Do: Accountants balance books, prepare tax returns, keep management informed on the company’s financial health, and help the company exercise sound judgment when buying assets of any kind.

Career 2 – Registered Nurse (RN)

Want to pursue opportunities in a growing – and rewarding – industry? Look into earning either an associate’s or bachelor’s in nursing or a nursing diploma.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of Labor says nursing will grow 22 percent from 2008 and 2018. Translated to the number of jobs, that’s 581,500 new RN positions.

What RNs Do: RNs provide patient care and education to those with medical conditions. They might administer medication, perform diagnostic tests, and run blood drives.

Career 3 – Computer Systems Analyst

If you’re looking for a growing career that requires big-picture thinking, computer systems analyst might be the right option for you. Consider earning a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of labor projects 20 percent job growth (108,100 computer systems analyst positions) from 2008-2018.

What Computer Systems Analysts Do: Computer systems analysts help implement and improve existing computer systems, reviewing capabilities, analyzing requirements, and making recommendations for software.

Career 4 – Dental Assistant

If you’re looking for careers with a strong rebound factor, dental assisting takes the cake. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this is one of the fastest growing professions from 2008-2018. The best part: You could potentially qualify to pursue opportunities in this field with a one-year dental assisting program.

Growth Factor: The U.S. Department of Labor expects 36 percent growth (105,600 new jobs) in this field between 2008 and 2018.

What Dental Assistants Do: Dental assistants perform a variety of functions in a dentist’s office, including preparing patients for procedures and updating dental records.

Career 5 – Computer Support Specialist

If there’s one industry that shows no signs of slowing down, it’s computer technology. Prepare for opportunities in one section of this growing field with an associate’s degree in information technology or computer science.

Growth Factor: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this profession is projected to experience 14 percent growth from 2008-2018. That’s 78,000 new jobs.

What Computer Support Specialists Do: Technical support specialists provide support and advice to computer users, writing training manuals, responding to questions, and resolving technical issues.

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Skills that are always in-demand

Skills that are always in-demand

For workers with these skills, switching careers could be an easier proposition.

Are you thinking of switching careers? When making your plans, don’t discount the power of transferrable skills and additional schooling.

“Everyone needs to be open to the idea of updating their skills through classes or getting a degree,” says Andrea Kay, a Cincinnati-based career expert. To help you figure out where to start, we put together a list of transferrable skills and matched them with popular career tracks.

Organizational Skills

Are you able to stay focused while juggling multiple responsibilities at work? Is your cubicle or desk neat and organized, even during the busiest part of your day? If so, you may be more ready than you think to move into a new career that values organizational skills…

Medical Assistant

Organizational skills could come in handy when juggling administrative and clinical tasks as a medical assistant. Often working in a busy hospital or doctor’s office, medical assistants might help with complete paperwork, take a patient’s vital signs, and assist physicians during exams.

Education: Earning a certificate in medical assisting or an associate’s degree in medical assisting is a great step towards pursuing this career and can generally be completed in two years or less, depending on school, program, and course load.

Average Earnings: $29,760

Paralegal

The “ability to organize” is cited by the National Federation of Paralegal Associations on its website as a key skill that paralegals need. As a paralegal you would help lawyers research and prepare documents and legal strategies. Transitioning into this career may make sense for organized-types who can demonstrate that they are detail-oriented and work well under pressure.

Education: An associate’s degree in paralegal studies is a common way to pursue this career, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. For those who already have a degree, earning a certificate in paralegal studies is another option. Certificate and associate’s degrees could be completed in two years or less, depending on school, program, and course load.

Average Earnings: $49,640

People Skills

Do you work well with others and enjoy meeting new people? If you find it easy to strike up a conversation, you might want to consider transitioning to a career that will put your people skills to work.

Human Resources Specialist

The ability to work well with different personalities can be an asset for HR specialists, who help companies recruit and retain the best and brightest workers. Talented people with strong communication skills may find it easier than others to transition into an HR position.

Education: Getting a bachelor’s degree in human resources or business administration is a helpful stepping stone for those interested in a career in HR, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

Average Earnings: $57,830

Sales Representative

People skills are crucial for sales representatives, who need to be able to communicate how their product will benefit potential clients. If you have a winning smile and an engaging personality, you may already possess assets that could help you transition into sales.

Education: There is no specific degree that sales representatives typically have, though communication skills are “essential,” according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Therefore studying communications, marketing, or business might give you the kinds of skills you need to pursue this career track. An associate’s degree, which generally takes two years to complete, depending on school and course load, could help one transition into this field.

Average Earnings: $62,720

Creative Skills

Do you love brainstorming? Are you able to see potential where others see problems? If you are a creative person who is looking for a new career, these exciting options may pique your interest.

Graphic Designer

Coming up with creative ideas on behalf of clients is a part of many graphic design gigs. A sense of style and knowledge of the latest graphic design computer software can offer a boost for anyone looking for a swift transition into this career.

Education: Aspiring graphic designers, take note: a bachelor’s degree in graphic design is usually required for both entry-level and advanced positions, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. If you already have a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated area, consider completing a shorter certificate program that can help bring you up to speed on technical requirements typical of this career track.

Average Earnings: $48,140

Marketing Specialist

Marketing is a career that requires a blend of business and creative skills. As a marketing specialist, you’ll likely be brainstorming ways to market products to the public while also helping set price points and monitoring the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors.

Education: For marketing positions, employers often prefer a bachelor’s degree in business administration or MBA with an emphasis in marketing, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department adds that any sales experience you have can also be useful preparation when transitioning into marketing.

Average Earnings: $66,850

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Beware of your social media history

Beware of your social media history

One firm collects everything you may have said or done online in the past seven years.

Companies have long used the criminal background checks, credit reports and even research on Google and LinkedIn to probe the past lives of potential employees. Now, some companies are requiring job applicants also pass a background check of social media.

A start-up years, social intelligence, scrapes the internet for all potential employees may have said or done online in the last seven years.

He then assembles a dossier with examples of professional awards and charitable work, as well as negative information that meets specific criteria: proof online racist remarks, references to drugs, sexually explicit images, messages text or videos, flagrant displays of weapons or bombs and clearly identifiable violent activity.

“We are not detectives,” said Max Drucker, CEO of the company, based in Santa Barbara, Calif. “All that we climb is what is publicly available on the Internet today.”

The Federal Trade Commission, after initially raising concerns last fall about Social Business Intelligence, the company is determined in accordance with the Act, the Fair Credit Reporting, but the service still alarms privacy advocates who say that invites employers to view information that may not be relevant to job performance.

And what a flattering relevant information has led to job offers being withdrawn or not? Mr. Drucker said that a prospective employee was found using Craigslist to look for OxyContin. A woman posing nude in the pictures she has set up a site for sharing the picture did not get the job she was looking for in a hospital.

Other background reports have been found examples of people who are anti-Semitic comments and racist remarks, he said. Then there was the job seeker who belonged to a Facebook group, “is America. I would not have to press 1 for English.” This raises a question. “Does that mean you do not like people who do not speak English?” Asked Dr. Drucker rhetoric.

Mr. Drucker said that his goal was to conduct pre-employment to help companies meet their obligation to conduct fair hiring practices and consistent while protecting the privacy of job applicants.

For example, he said reports remove references to religion of any person, race, marital status, sexual orientation, disability and other information protected by federal employment, where companies are not supposed to ask about during interviews. In addition, applicants must first consent to background checks, and they are informed of any adverse information found.

It supports research to reduce the risk that employers may confuse the candidate working with someone else or displayed on the Information Society that is not legally admissible or relevant. “Googling someone is ridiculously unfair,” he said. “An employer may discriminate against someone inadvertently. Or worse, they face all kinds of allegations of discrimination.”

Marc S. Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, based in Washington, said that employers have the right to gather information to make a decision on the expertise of job-related, but concerned that “employers should not judge what people do in their private life away from the workplace.”

Less than a third of the surface data firm Mr. Drucker just like the major social platforms like Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. He said most of the negative information about job candidates comes from web searches found deep to comment on blogs and messages on small social sites like Tumblr, the blogging site, as well as Yahoo user groups, e-commerce sites, message boards and even Craigslist.

Then there are the photos and videos that people post – or are tagged in – on Facebook and YouTube and other sharing sites like Flickr, Picasa, Photobucket and Yfrog.

And there are pictures and videos that seem to get most people in need. “Sexually explicit pictures and videos are beyond understanding,” Mr. Drucker said. “We see such blatant displays of weapons. And we see a lot of illegal activities. Many, many pictures of drug use. ”

He recalled a man who had 15 pages of photos to show with different guns, including an assault rifle. Another man included pictures of himself standing in a greenhouse with a large marijuana plants.

Given the complex “conditions of service” agreements on most sites and Web applications, said Rotenberg people do not realize that comments or content that they generate are publicly available.

“People are led to believe that there is more limited communication that there is indeed, in many cases,” he said, noting that frequent changes to Facebook’s privacy settings in recent years may put people at risk to find a job today because of the personal information they may have inadvertently made public.

“What Facebook did was to take personal information from people they have available to family and friends and make this information more widely available to potential employers,” said Mr. Rotenberg, whose organization has several complaints pending at the Federal Trade Commission on the privacy settings of Facebook.

Joe Bontke, outreach manager for the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Houston, said he regularly reminds employers and human resource managers about the risks of violation of federal rules and laws against discrimination in employment using the online search in hiring decisions.

“The things you can not ask in an interview are the same things that you can not research,” he said, which includes the full range of information on the age of a person, sex, religion, disability, national origin and race.

However, he added that 75 percent of recruiters are required by their companies to research candidates online. And 70 percent of recruiters in the report that the United States they have rejected candidates because of information online, he said.

Dave Clark, owner of Advanced Impulse Communications, a telecommunications company in Southern California, began to rely on social intelligence for screening background, because it said the company needed a formal strategy and standards before assembling information online about candidates. “They provided us a standardized arm’s length how to use this additional information to make better hiring decisions,” he said.

About half of all businesses, based on government and private investigations, are now using credit reports as part of the hiring process, except in states that limit or restrict their use. As with background checks of social media, there are concerns about information that appeared. The equal employment agency filed a lawsuit last December against the Company Kaplan Higher Education, accusing it of discrimination against black job seekers in the way we use credit history in its hiring process.

But it is not unusual for senior high-level executives in many companies to submit to background checks even more complete by a private firm to survey.

“We live in a world where you have an incredible amount of information and data on all officers,” said Ann Blinkhorn, an executive recruiter in the converging technologies, media and communications industry. “I think it puts the burden on the recruiter and the hiring manager to be truly reflected on what is important and not important in the hiring decision.”

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