Terri Kelly Moyers: I trust myself as an artist

Terri Kelly Moyers: I trust myself as an artist

Terri Kelly Moyers has never wanted to do anything in life but paint. Even as a child growing up in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, she was constantly drawing, mostly horses. She briefly studied at the Alberta College of Art and also the Mount Royal Community College, but the stylistic emphasis in these two institutions was not of the realist, nature-based school that interested Terri.

She continued working independently until she attended a month-long painting workshop taught by the artist, Robert Lougheed, at the Okanagan Game Farm in British Columbia. It was there that she began in earnest painting animals from life as well as rubbing shoulders with and getting advice from artists from all over America. One of those artists receiving instruction from Lougheed was her future husband, John Moyers, of New Mexico.

Another artist who was a valuable influence was the Canadian painter and environmentalist, Clarence Tillenius, who had been a friend and colleague of the painter, Carl Rungius.

Whether painting a portrait or a landscape or a cowgirl riding a horse, Moyer’s subjects are things that are beautiful and that move her. “I want to share what I see with other people and help them have the same pleasure I have. Each artist interprets and edits things in a different way, infusing his or her work with a different quality or emotion.”

Moyer’s favorite subject is the American cowgirl. “I enjoy painting women,” she says. “I feel women had a major role to play in the West, and maybe that hasn’t been recognized as much as it could be.”

Terri Moyers exhibits annually at the Prix de West Show at the Cowboy Hall of Fame, Oklahoma City, and at the Masters of the American West Show at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage, Los Angeles. She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with her husband, artist John Moyers and their son, Josh.

She muses about her art: “I trust myself as an artist…” As she continues to grow as a painter, she says that the mechanics become more automatic. “…Then the creative stuff kicks in…. It’s all a journey.”

Jack Vettriano and Anniversary Waltz

Jack Vettriano and Anniversary Waltz

Born in Fife, Scotland in 1951, Jack Vettriano left school at sixteen to become a mining engineer. For his twenty-first birthday, a girlfriend gave him a set of watercolour paints and, from then on, he spent much of his spare time teaching himself to paint.

In 1989, he submitted two paintings to the Royal Scottish Academy’s annual exhibition; both were accepted and sold on the first day. The following year, an equally enthusiastic reaction greeted the three paintings, which he entered for the prestigious Summer Exhibition at London’s Royal Academy and his new life as an artist began from that point on.

Over the last twenty years, interest in Vettriano’s work has grown consistently. There have been sell-out solo exhibitions in Edinburgh, London, Hong Kong and New York.

2004 was an exceptional year in Vettriano’s career; his best known painting, The Singing Butler was sold at Sotheby’s for close to £750,000; he was awarded an OBE for Services to the Visual Arts and was the subject of a South Bank Show documentary, entitled ‘Jack Vettriano: The People’s Painter’.

From 1994-2007, Vettriano was represented by Portland Gallery in London but the relationship ended in June 2007. Since then, Vettriano has been focusing on a variety of private projects, including the launch of a new book, and painting of a portrait of Zara Phillips as part of a charity fund-raising project for Sport Relief, the experience of which was captured in a documentary broadcast on BBC1 in March 2008. Vettriano divides his time between his homes in Fife, London and Nice.

The Birth of a God and Symbolism in Salvador Dali’s Artworks

The Birth of a God and Symbolism in Salvador Dali's Artworks

Salvador Dalí employed extensive symbolism in his work. For instance, the hallmark “melting watches” that first appear in The Persistence of Memory suggest Einstein’s theory that time is relative and not fixed.[29] The idea for clocks functioning symbolically in this way came to Dalí when he was staring at a runny piece of Camembert cheese on a hot August day.

The elephant is also a recurring image in Dalí’s works. It appeared in his 1944 work Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate a Second Before Awakening. The elephants, inspired by Gian Lorenzo Bernini’s sculpture base in Rome of an elephant carrying an ancient obelisk, are portrayed “with long, multijointed, almost invisible legs of desire” along with obelisks on their backs. Coupled with the image of their brittle legs, these encumbrances, noted for their phallic overtones, create a sense of phantom reality.

“The elephant is a distortion in space”, one analysis explains, “its spindly legs contrasting the idea of weightlessness with structure.” “I am painting pictures which make me die for joy, I am creating with an absolute naturalness, without the slightest aesthetic concern, I am making things that inspire me with a profound emotion and I am trying to paint them honestly.” —Salvador Dalí, in Dawn Ades, Dalí and Surrealism.

The egg is another common Dalíesque image. He connects the egg to the prenatal and intrauterine, thus using it to symbolize hope and love; it appears in The Great Masturbator and The Metamorphosis of Narcissus. The Metamorphosis of Narcissus also symbolized death and petrification.

Various other animals appear throughout his work as well: ants point to death, decay, and immense sexual desire; the snail is connected to the human head (he saw a snail on a bicycle outside Freud’s house when he first met Sigmund Freud); and locusts are a symbol of waste and fear.

Both Dalí and his father enjoyed eating sea urchins, freshly caught in the sea near Cadaqués. The symmetry of the sea urchin fascinated Dalí and adapted its form to many art works and other foods also appear throughout his work.